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SOCIAL EXCLUSION: IMPACT ON DALITS IN INDIA

SOCIAL EXCLUSION: IMPACT ON DALITS IN INDIA

Social exclusion remains a malaise in all societies. Social exclusion is a process by which individuals or groups are wholly or partially excluded from full participation in the society within which they live. The causes for exclusion can vary from country to country in different times: Reflecting different situation such as geographically, historically and politically but the result will be the same in the form of lack of people development and country. As a result of social exclusion. Its impact on the live hood of the people such as increase in the rate of poverty, health and others. The exclusion is practiced world wide mostly in the identity of gender, caste, religion, ethnicity, color, race, nationality and others. In India unique forms of exclusion are observed where certain group like the dalits, experience systematic exclusion in regard to accruing the benefits of development, and institutional inequality and discrimination have been prevailed in the society. It hampers democracy, development and social integration.
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Social support for schoolchildren at risk of social exclusion

Social support for schoolchildren at risk of social exclusion

continues throughout life, but is most intensive during childhood, adolescence and youth. The institutes of socialization are the family and educational institutions. Western studies recognize the church as the third institute of socialization. Family’s composition, its educational practices and the features of child-to-parent relationships impact the development of a child’s personality. Negative influence of a family situation on children can be vividly traced based on the frequency of runaways from home. Children living with only one parent or with a non-biological parent run away from home more often than those who live with both parents. Children who grow up in two parent families attend school better than those raised by the mother, by the father or than those with no parents. Parents’ involvement in educational process and their interest in child’s achievements have positive effect on school attendance. School also has great influence with regards to the social exclusion. Children rejected by their peers become aggressive in their inter-personal contacts (Wheeler, Stomfay-Stitz, 2004). As young people or adults, former victims of bullying encounter difficulties in establishing close, love based relationships. Peer rejection always causes psychological trauma. The impact of the teacher’s personality is important to academic performance and attendance: more experienced teachers have greater impact on schoolchildren’s personal characteristics.
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Decision makers are resilient in the face of social exclusion

Decision makers are resilient in the face of social exclusion

In Experiment 2, we compared judgments and decisions among those who were excluded and included in the game of Cyberball. Overall, the experience of rejection did not have an impact on participants’ responses. Although classic judgment and decision-making fallacies were common in our sample, they were not more prevalent among the excluded individuals. This is in contrast to our predictions that social exclusion leads to impaired deliberative thinking. In the case of temporal discounting, the results showed a significant difference between the included and excluded participants. Excluded participants showed more patience and less discounting on average, which is inconsistent with the previous research showing that participants in an exclusion condition were less patient than those in the included condition (Twenge et al., 2002a).
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Sexual orientation and social exclusion in Italy

Sexual orientation and social exclusion in Italy

Such an approach has the advantage of recognising both the social and the multidimensional nature of poverty/social exclusion. However, it share all the limitations of the “head-count ratio” family of indicators (Alkire and Foster, 2011). Specifically: (i) it measures the number of “excluded” people in the population, without telling anything concerning the degree or severity of such exclusion; and (ii) it is based on a dichotomous concept of social exclusion: given a poverty line for each variable, every individual exhibiting a value of such variable strictly above the poverty line is considered as totally included in society, and every individual at or below the poverty line is considered as completely excluded from society. Such feature is liable to two sorts of limitations. First, an empirical one, in so far as the results crucially depend on the definition of the poverty line (which in this case has been normatively set by the policy-maker), and they ignore the potential dynamic nature of poverty, i.e. the fact that a substantial number of individuals may cross the poverty line in different directions along a certain time span, getting in and out of poverty. Second a conceptual problem, given the gradual nature of “inclusion” and “exclusion”, with people enjoying different degrees of participation in society, rather than being strictly divided into two separate groups. As a consequence, we employ a fuzzy set approach to the measurement of social exclusion (for recent reviews, see for example Ragin and Pennings, 2005; Berenger and Verdier-Chouchane, 2007; Chiappero-Martinetti, 2008; Chiappero-Martinetti and Roche, 2009). Assuming it is possible to summarise all the several dimensions of inclusion into a straight line, we posit that social inclusion and exclusion should be conceptualised as a continuous variable that may be normalised so as to take on values comprised between 1 (denoting full social inclusion) to 0 (denoting complete exclusion).
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Observatory on national policies to combat social exclusion. Social exclusion in Belgium 1990-1991 Consolidated report

Observatory on national policies to combat social exclusion. Social exclusion in Belgium 1990-1991 Consolidated report

We have integrated some elements from the first edition of the "Jaarboek Armoede en Sociale Uitsluiting/Annuaire sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale" (Yearbook on Poverty and Social Exclusion) as well (Vranken, Geldof, 1992). We hope the report gives a fairly representative picture of what is happening in Belgium with respect to social exclusion in all its forms. However, we are well aware of the fact that the Dutch­ speaking part of the country has been covered more extensively and intensively than the French-speaking part. The sole reason for this is the lack of financial means. We expect to improve our coverage of Wallonia and Brussels in the next months. The remarks made by the Belgian government-representative have been very helpful.
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The social exclusion debate : strategies, controversies and dilemmas

The social exclusion debate : strategies, controversies and dilemmas

NDC was established in 39 neighbourhoods during 1999 and 2000, each getting some £50 million over a 10-year period. NDC neighbourhoods fall within the worst 10% in the Index of Local Deprivation (DETR, 1998), compiled around the Government‟s main indicators of social exclusion: jobs, crime, health, education and housing. The goal of NDC is to raise indices in these areas to local citywide averages and to the level of national „floor targets‟ set by government – for example „by 2004 to reduce school truancies by 10% compared to 2002, and sustain the new lower level, and improve overall attendance levels thereafter‟ (www.neighbourhood.gov.uk). The goals of the programme are to create social inclusion in the following ways: building human and social capital, re-developing the local physical and economic infrastructure, improving the delivery of public services and mobilising local residents in the governance of their neighbourhoods. It is therefore a test of New Labour‟s approach to community regeneration and social inclusion at the neighbourhood scale.
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Social capital, poverty and social exclusion in Italy

Social capital, poverty and social exclusion in Italy

economic life. In other words, the analysis will capture the relationship across the region between social capital and the multidimensional sphere of the living standard. In doing so, the first initial problem we face is to operationally separate the concept of poverty from that one of social exclusion. The concept of social exclusion has been recognised in the literature to be complex and rich of dimensions (Townsend 1979, Negri 1995, Bohnke 2001, Capacci and Castagnaro 2003, Burchardt et al 1999). However, whether poverty and social exclusion has to be a single phenomenon or two distinct aspects of a society is still an open and unsolved question (Stranges 2007). This paper is far from solving this dilemma and it does not have even the intention. By completely respecting the different positions taken by the scholars, we will consider these two aspects as determinant for a better living condition. In terms of methodology and measurements, we will distinguish the two concepts with a certain “degree of freedom”. While poverty definitions are essentially based on monetary values either in terms of consumption or in terms of income (Grootaert 2001, Gertler, Levine and Moretti 2006, Pritchett 1997, just to mention some of the numerous empirical works in the poverty literature), social exclusion combines economic, social and human aspects. In other words, this concept is not only limited to the individual sphere but to the society ones (Stranges 2007, Sen 1997). Therefore we consider poverty and social exclusion as a continuum process of the same socio-economic “degrade”.
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Disability and Social Exclusion Dynamics in Italian Households

Disability and Social Exclusion Dynamics in Italian Households

Most recently the literature on the economics of disability has been enriched by studies focusing on the dynamics of poverty. This includes Meyer and Mok (2006) that study the dynamics of individual income, consumption and earnings after a disability shock in the US, and Shahtamaseb et al. (2011) who find that households with disabled children in UK are not exposed to a different dynamic into and out of poverty with respect to other households. Moreover, both Parodi and Sciulli (2012) for Italian households and Davila-Quintana and Malo (2012) for Spanish individuals find that disability determines a higher risk of income poverty, and explain it more in terms of persistence (initial conditions and structural characteristics) than state dependence. It follows that this paper adds to the existing literature introducing a multidimensional perspective to analyzing the well-being dynamics of households with and without disabled people. The study of persistence in social exclusion is important for its policy implications. If social exclusion is explained by true state dependence this could suggest that short-term policies may be effective for reducing the risk of social exclusion in the future, while if social exclusion mainly depends on unobserved (and observable) heterogeneity, long- term policies affecting structural variables would be effective.
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The multi dimensional analysis of social exclusion

The multi dimensional analysis of social exclusion

This definition does not address the structural issues of inequality, polarisation, social mobility and social closure noted above. A definition is a purposive construction, and this is designed to facilitate the exploration of the experience or effects of exclusion at the individual and/or household level. In the context of the present study, structural characteristics are best seen as drivers of social exclusion, rather than constitutive of it. A review of the literature on the drivers of social exclusion conducted for the SEU in 2004 identified three areas of macro- drivers. “Poverty, inequality and social exclusion”, it argues, “are driven upwards and downwards by three major contextual factors: demographic, labour market and social policy” (Bradshaw et al, 2004, p 9). The demographic factors operating in the past to increase levels of social exclusion have been “large youth cohorts, ageing and increased dependency ratios, and family change, particularly the increase in lone parent families”. The impact of these is currently less, but there are additional trends of inward migration, single living and cohabitation that may possibly lead to increased levels of social exclusion. Labour market factors have included unemployment, ‘flexibility’ and greater insecurity in the labour market, the dispersion of earnings and the concentration of work. Social policy changes in the 1980s and 1990s also, they argue, led to increased levels of social exclusion: uprating benefits in line with prices rather than earnings; abolition and cuts to some benefits; a shift from direct to indirect taxation and a consequently more regressive system; cuts in service expenditure, especially on housing, or increases that were insufficient to meet increased need. However, they point out that if social policy can be a macro-driver of social exclusion, it is also capable of reducing it (Bradshaw et al, 2004, pp 13, 100).
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Schools, Education and Social Exclusion

Schools, Education and Social Exclusion

Whilst the concept of social exclusion is not new, its widespread use in British social policy discourse is. Despite the increasing use of the term, there is no single definition of social exclusion and the term is used with a variety of definitions in mind. For some, social exclusion is merely a new way to refer to existing concepts such as poverty or unemployment (Levitas, 1997; Paugam, 1993). However, a number of commentators have adopted a broader definition centred on a notion of ‘integration’, rather than a sole concern with the distribution of resources. From this perspective social exclusion is a process of long term non-participation in the economic, civic, and social norms that integrate and govern the society in which an individual resides (Burchardt et al., 1998). It is conceptually differentiated from poverty and deprivation, primarily by having a focus on the process of disengagement. Indeed, tracing this process from source to outcome emerges as a key issue (Room, 1995), and as a result social exclusion perspectives recognise the dynamism of individuals’ trajectories over time. In addition the term moves the unit of analysis from the individual, to socially structured disadvantage. Maintaining this focus helps to ensure that social exclusion theories and policies do not fall solely back on deficit theories focused on the pathology of individuals or groups of individuals (Leney, 1999).
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Aid, peasants and social exclusion

Aid, peasants and social exclusion

Using unique village census data collected in 2003 and 2008 in Senegal, we assess the impact of a major World Bank-funded Community Driven Development (CDD) program on membership and assortative matching in community-based organizations (CBOs). We implement both standard discrete choice and dyadic regression techniques. We find that channeling development aid through CBOs makes these organizations more inclusive in the sense that a number of tradition- bound assortative matching patterns are partly broken. Ceteris paribus, this leads to more heterogeneous CBOs. On the other hand, the likelihood of CBO membership is reduced in treated villages, with significant differences between men and women. Our results suggest that grassroots level development projects which target CBOs must be carefully designed and executed if they are not to result, paradoxically, in a greater degree of social exclusion, with differentiation by gender playing a crucial role.
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The oldest old and the risk of social exclusion

The oldest old and the risk of social exclusion

The second dimension of social exclusion to be explored concerns social relations. For this, there are two variables in the dataset that we treat as outcomes in our multivariate modelling. Firstly, Understanding Society asks if each respondent ‘visits family when needs to’ (variable name: c_visfam). This is a categorical variable with responses given on a scale from one (very difficult) to five (very easy). There is also a sixth category, for respondents who spontaneously reply that they have no family. For the purpose of our analysis, we recode this variable by combining ‘very difficult’ and ‘difficult’ into one category, to represent difficulty visiting family as an indicator of exclusion from social relations. We then create a second category from all other valid responses, for individuals who do not have difficulty in visiting family. Respondents with no family are excluded from this analysis. We then treat this new dichotomous variable as an outcome in a logistic regression model, again including all of the predictors listed above, to determine the effect of age on the likelihood of experiencing this dimension of social exclusion.
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Social Exclusion Unit Report – Summary

Social Exclusion Unit Report – Summary

36. It may be the severity and specificity of the multiple needs each very disadvantaged person faces that makes it difficult for some current public services to help them. However, unless policy is able to address the needs of disadvantaged groups, the overall risk of social exclusion may be reduced, but people in most need will be left further behind. We need to improve service design and delivery to extend the reach of what works to those who need it most.

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Poverty, Social Exclusion and Disadvantage in Australia

Poverty, Social Exclusion and Disadvantage in Australia

Poverty as measured in this section is based on a relatively simple income measure. The latter section on child social exclusion provides a more complex perspective on disadvantage faced by Australian children. Income, however, remains a very important driver of the opportunities afforded to children. Research suggests that there is a strong correlation between low income families and the future wellbeing of children. For example, children who live in poverty are less likely to complete high school and have poor nutrition. These studies also show that these impacts are particularly problematic in the earliest years of a child’s life and that the persistence of poverty compounds these problems (Brooks-Gunn 1997).
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Social Exclusion and Jobs Reservation in India

Social Exclusion and Jobs Reservation in India

This paper argues that social exclusion robs people of their "confidence" and this loss adversely affects their capacity to function effectively. We may not be able to define confidence precisely but we know it when we have it and also when we lack it. In a “just” society, no group should unfairly suffer from a “confidence deficit” or enjoy a “confidence surplus”. However, affirmative action policies to boost a deprived group's employment rate suffer from several defects. In particular, they may have only a small effect (as with Dalits in India) when the group's educational base is low. Consequently, another prong of policy could, indeed should, focus on improving the educational standards of Dalits. The root of the problem of poor Dalit achievement lies in the many dysfunctional primary and secondary schools in the villages and towns of India. Admittedly, tackling the problem at its roots will only yield results after a long delay. Nor does the emphasis on effective learning at school carry the glamour associated with being a putative graduate of the Indian Institute of
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Football's Ability to Combat Social Exclusion

Football's Ability to Combat Social Exclusion

Because the desired outcomes from sports participation are “only a possibility” (Svoboda, 1994) there is a need to consider sufficient conditions (those under which the potential outcomes are achieved). In looking forwards, football needs to address this question of what conditions are necessary if it is to make a substantial impact in combating social exclusion. Carefully applying logic models to the various elements of Table 2 should help to clarify that. Whatever the current state of play, football’s institutions need to be made open to all, even those who may currently be viewed as ‘outsiders’. People need to feel they can play a part in running the game, since true inclusion is conditional upon the chance to share in the decision-making process.
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Child social exclusion

Child social exclusion

This framework was used empirically in a series of studies for the UK Cabinet Office exploring multi-dimensional social exclusion across the life course including families with children (Oroyemi, Damioli, Barnes, & Crosier, 2009) and young people (Cusworth, Bradshaw, Coles, Keung, & Chzhen, 2009). Main and Bradshaw (2015) also analysed the social exclusion of families with children in the UK Poverty and Social Exclusion survey 2015. However, all these studies were based on household surveys and adult respondents. The first and only person to have attempted to operationalise social exclusion using a survey of children is Gross-Manos (2015) following Middleton and Adelman (2003) and using the Israel data on 12 year olds from the first pilot phase of the Children’s Worlds survey. Starting with twenty two items related to social exclusion, then using factor analysis, she reduced these to three domains relating to school, area and services, and participation in social
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Transport, social exclusion and the internet: Could virtual mobility help to alleviate social exclusion?

Transport, social exclusion and the internet: Could virtual mobility help to alleviate social exclusion?

Much consideration to date regarding the various forms of ICT has concerned the resulting consequences for transport, notably whether or not travel demand is reduced or increased. This paper has traced recent developments in research and government policy and highlighted that a third dimension must be added to consideration of transport and ICTs - namely social participation (and the consequences for quality of life). Preliminary observations from the exploratory qualitative research undertaken suggest that virtual mobility may (already) be performing a role in improving people's quality of life by enabling them to enrich their lives through participation in new on-line activities without a requirement for increased physical mobility. At the same time, evidence of virtual mobility substituting for and thereby reducing existing levels of physical mobility is scant. These observations highlight an important point. In terms of addressing the problem of social exclusion it is not a discrete choice between enhanced physical access or enhanced virtual access. This research highlights that the two can work together to improve social participation. However, the research has also pointed to the concern that differences in the level of virtual access between individuals can reinforce or augment exclusion caused through differences (deficits) in real-world access.
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SOCIAL EXCLUSION AND YOUTHS IN GLOBAL ERA: AN OVERVIEW

SOCIAL EXCLUSION AND YOUTHS IN GLOBAL ERA: AN OVERVIEW

The determinants of and possible solutions to youth social exclusion allows for three main concluding remarks - Young people are at risk of social exclusion. Across the different dimensions investigated, a significant proportion of the youth population is living in marginalized and deprived conditions, which hinder them from exercising their fundamental rights and threaten their long-term future; the main determinants of social exclusion are rooted in social inequalities, such as obstacles to accessing quality education and training, securing adequate employment, suffering from discriminatory practices and attitudes, as well as being subject to exclusionary processes based on residence and/or citizenship; finally the discrimination, and in particular gender based discrimination, appears to affect significantly the health and emotional wellbeing of young people. Feeling discriminated against one's own religion, colour, and sexual identity also poses serious obstacles to youth participation.
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The Subtleties of Social Exclusion: Race, Social Class, and the Exclusion of Blacks in a Racially Mixed Neighborhood

The Subtleties of Social Exclusion: Race, Social Class, and the Exclusion of Blacks in a Racially Mixed Neighborhood

There are many cases of minority groups being socially ex- cluded, based on such characteristics as race, ethnicity, caste, gender, or sexual orientation (DFID, 2005; Freiler, 2001; Islam & Sharmin, 2011), resulting in a lack of equal access to politi- cal, social, and economic resources. Many of these cases are explicit, with the exclusion codified in law or deep cultural practices. And there have been attempts at all levels of gov- ernment and civil society to counteract these by promoting social inclusion (Edwards, 1999; Kay, 2005; Vargas, 2001). This study adds to the development literature by examining a case in which social exclusion based on race is subtle (see Curry et al., 2011 for another example), as those with power in a neighborhood association justify their actions based on wanting to increase the “livability” and social class composition of their neighborhood. Though they never mention race, they engage in activities that disproportionately exclude black residents.
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