Top PDF Examining the Creative Process; Electronic technology in art and design

Examining the Creative Process; Electronic technology in art and design

Examining the Creative Process; Electronic technology in art and design

Resistant to fully embrace works created on the computer, the fine art world, and public alike, have yet to fully accept the unique qualities of the creative.. process in computer art.[r]

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A DESIGN PROCESS FOR CREATIVE TECHNOLOGY

A DESIGN PROCESS FOR CREATIVE TECHNOLOGY

Prototypes are subsequently discarded, improved or (partially) merged into new prototypes. The evaluation may also lead to a new functional specification, in its turn leading to a new prototype. The large number of prototypes built and evaluated is a major difference from the Engineering Design approach, where typically one prototype is built and improved until the final design is reached. Also the kind of prototypes is different: as the user experience is a driving factor here, prototypes are often reduced to single or few aspects of the overall future product that is responsible for a certain kind of experience. The distinguishing characteristics with respect to Industrial Design is the interplay between technology and user experience. According to the different design material, the prototypes in Creative Technology often contain electronic components, such as microcontrollers, and show some dynamic behaviour.
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LinTronic products. State-of-the-art technology and electronic design

LinTronic products. State-of-the-art technology and electronic design

Our 8-channel relay board is often used to control motors in curtains, blinders, projector, screen lifts, light, lamps, etc.. For example works perfect with a Beosystem to create the per[r]

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Guest Speaker - Art, Nature and the Creative Process

Guest Speaker - Art, Nature and the Creative Process

As a workshop facilitator I create, design and implement workshops taking into consideration the uniqueness of each group and area of interest. Art and Nature workshops have been designed for children, adults, college students and special interest students.

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Technology, Art and Design -Technology Courses

Technology, Art and Design -Technology Courses

TADT 3700 Operations Planning and Control (3 credits) The concepts, tools, techniques, and quantitative methods used to plan for and control operations in the production of goods and services. Topics include, but are not limited to, traditional inventory management, just-in-time inventory, materials- and enterprise-resource planning, facilities location and layout, process strategies, aggregate planning, scheduling, maintenance and reliability, project management, and supply chain management. Prerequisite: Junior status or consent of instructor.

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Technology, Art and Design -Technology Courses

Technology, Art and Design -Technology Courses

TADT 3537 Industrial Design/Innovation (3 credits) Exploration of the history, philosophy and application of industrial design. Includes defining specific customer needs and the research, identification, testing, assessment and implementation of effective solutions to technological problems. Also included is the development of a design proposal, written and graphic documentation, and the ethical, environmental, social and economic impacts of design solutions. Incorporates the role, purpose and relationship of innovation in business and industry with the design process. Prerequisite(s):
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Paradoxes of creativity : examining the creative process through an antenarrative lens

Paradoxes of creativity : examining the creative process through an antenarrative lens

Formative approaches understand the creative process as a search for new ideas by producing them in-between the senses and the mind through acts of encounter (Gherardi & Perrotta, 2014, p. 143). Artisans, for example, often start with a vague and blurred vision of what they want to create and only during the process of production, when they start playing with the “materials, tools, techniques, design, form, and function”, the vision that essentially inspired them becomes more and more clear (Guthrie, 2007, p. 2). In other words, through formation, artisans start to understand their antenarrative bet on the future by playing in an engaging manner (Mainemelis & Ronson, 2006). This is visible in any form of craftsmanship which, far from being mechanical or repetitive, requires imagination, anticipation as well as skill (Glăveanu, in press; Sennett, 2008; Stierand, 2015). Approaches that acknowledge the notion of sudden inspiration argue that ‘having an idea’ is a “manifest sign of long,
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The art of regeneration: the establishment and development of the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology, 1985–2010

The art of regeneration: the establishment and development of the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology, 1985–2010

Situating Video Positive in Liverpool was always likely to have this impact on its international profile, but it also offered an opportunity to develop a stronger national profile and local influence as a consequence. As stated in Section 2.1.1, the end of the NIVF in 1988 had left an opportunity for a video art festival to be developed, and Video Positive was unrivalled in Britain throughout its duration. Furthermore, an increasing amount of media art entering Britain’s galleries during the 1990s, and a greater level of output by artists, enabled more exposure of the practice and, therefore, more funding opportunities to emerge. Video Positive 1989 included about fifteen new commissions, 386 and by Video Positive 1997 the festival had grown to over forty exhibitions across ten separate venues. 387 Although Video Positive 1997 could perhaps be seen as the zenith of Video Positive, with such a scale of growth transforming the festival almost beyond recognition, 388 the difficulties this growth signalled led to Berg reporting to the FACT Board that Video Positive 1997 was only “a qualified success.” 389 By this, Berg was referring to the financial strain that such a large festival placed on FACT and its resources, especially as it happened at a time of great upheaval for the organisation. 1997 was also the year that the FACT brand was launched, and the financial pressures of this process, alongside the ISEA98 project, exacerbated the problems caused by the enlarged Video Positive 1997, and led to a significantly scaled down version of the festival three years later. That Video Positive 2000 was so significantly reduced in size, exhibiting at only three venues in Liverpool city centre, can be seen as Moviola having reverted to its earlier observation of Video Positive 1989 that “in an effort to make it big we made it too big,” 390 but it may also be evidence of video art’s better integration into the conventional arts institutional framework, thus reducing the need for an event of this nature.
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Bachelor of Creative Design. Game Art. Course Components

Bachelor of Creative Design. Game Art. Course Components

Portfolio Presentation & Critique: GA3C03 GA3C03 focuses on individual investigation and discovery. Utilising student artefacts with an emphasis on marketability, industry expectation, and presentation, the students will present their work in the form of a demo reel and/or web-based portfolio. Students are critiqued by peer groups and industry professionals. Student process and progress will be documented and presented alongside the portfolio. Portfolio pieces are required to show evidence that the student is combining conceptual thinking, critical thinking, creative thinking, strong technical and communication skills, as well as imagination, which is crucial in developing a personal vision.
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SOUNDART SOUND DESIGN FOR ART AND ENTERTAINMENT IN THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

SOUNDART SOUND DESIGN FOR ART AND ENTERTAINMENT IN THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

Training goals Career opportunities The Master Course in Sound Design responds to the growing need of training a highly qualified and technically-cultural interventions in the field of acoustics as well as in the development, promotion and exploitation of music and the arts. The need for greater professionalism with requirements planning and technical acoustics is underlined by the inadequacy of professional expertise available today in view of the complexity of the phenomena. The objective of the course is to reconstruct the strategic significance of artistic design, architecture, performing with the sound and to its environment as a process of a new connection between formal structures, content, utility and functional requirements to enhance the physical and formal resources, socio-cultural and engineering properties of the sound space. The Master consists of an annual cycle of extensive post-graduate studies post lauream, aiming to specialize this professional figure required for the strategic conduct of programs of intervention in relation to new demands for qualified technical performance in terms of controlling and interdisciplinary operational directing.
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Art and Design and Design and Technology: Is there creativity in the designing?

Art and Design and Design and Technology: Is there creativity in the designing?

This paper explores the potential of ‘blurring the boundaries’ between art and design and design and technology with specific reference to ‘improving creativity’ in design and technology, as recommended in an inspection report of secondary and primary schools in England by Ofsted (2008: 7). The paper explores the evolution of the English National Curriculum in art and design and design and technology. It discusses the impact of the 2007 programmes of study for Key Stage 3 (pupils aged 11-14 years) in the context of commonalities across the two subjects with specific reference to designing and creativity. It looks at the increased interest in creativity in the curriculum and presents the findings of a small-scale research project exploring creativity in art and design and design and technology. The development of a three feature model that can be used for analysing creativity in an educational context is described together with a model for helping pupils make design decisions. The paper continues with a brief review of units of work in art and design and design and technology and identifies similarities and differences of approach and outcome. It concludes that designing is a creative activity used by professional designers; however, there are issues of whether pupils, as novice designers, can rely solely on learning the process of ‘designing’ to ensure their creativity potential in the context of a school classroom. As a complex concept creativity, depends on the convergence of a number of features. These include sound domain or subject knowledge and skills, process-relevant features that control the direction and progress of the creative process and social, environmental features that ensure a supportive, conducive environment that enables pupils to be confident, motivated and able to take risk. The role of the teacher in ensuring pupils’ creativity is crucial in that they need to plan interesting open-ended units of work, give pupils opportunities to make design decisions, ‘dwell time’ for reflection and plan the effective use of resources and space. It suggests that collaboration between teachers of art and design and design and technology would be beneficial in the quest for creativity within the context of appreciating the similarities and differences of the subjects.
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A Further Study on the Talent Cultivation of Creative Industries and Design Art

A Further Study on the Talent Cultivation of Creative Industries and Design Art

With the needs of creative industries, design art talent must integrate creation, research and development and design together. Harry Potter, the $6 billion industrial chain, a popular cultural and commercial band, is the specific practice of design art. China's cultural and creative strategy and enhancing the cultural industry is in need for such impact and thinking. A kind of cultural industry, penetrating into the field of publishing, film, game and derivative products, has not stopped. It will enter the lower areas, such as toys, clothing, stationery, food, etc, which is in line with the needs of the high-end design artistic effect of creative industries. More creative thinking training content should be added in the talent cultivation process, encourage the pursuit of attractive novel ideas. The creative industries which attract people and produce greater economic benefits often are design art products with shot cycle but much creative content, such as animation, newspaper, theatrical performances and other original category of cultural industries.
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Concept Blending and Dissimilarity: Factors for Creative Design Process: A Comparison between the Linguistic Interpretation Process and Design Process

Concept Blending and Dissimilarity: Factors for Creative Design Process: A Comparison between the Linguistic Interpretation Process and Design Process

Toshiharu Taura DRS Fellow. Professor of Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Japan. He received B.S. , M.S. and Dr.Eng. degrees from the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1977, 1979, and 1991, respectively. In 1992 he appointed Associate Professor at the University of Tokyo and joined Kobe University in 1998. He has been engaged in Visiting Professor of Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology since 2005. He is currently working on several research issues that focus on the creative thought process of both engineering and industrial design, including interdisciplinary aspects of design science. His research aim is to identify standard characteristics of design, i, e, answering the question
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Art and Design Technology Technician JOB DESCRIPTION

Art and Design Technology Technician JOB DESCRIPTION

There is a first rate library with a full time professional librarian and there are regular visits by authors and poets. The school also has strong traditions in sport, drama and music. The move to co-education, which began in 2007, has resulted in exciting times for the School. Pupil numbers have risen from 170 to over 270, and outstanding classroom and creative arts facilities have been opened. In addition, the Music School has been extended to include a music technology suite. There has also been considerable development of sport and play areas including an Astro Turf.
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Panel presentation at international symposium for electronic art 'Waves of technology'

Panel presentation at international symposium for electronic art 'Waves of technology'

Then we’ll move to an idea proposed by Dr Leon Gurevitch Deputy Head of School and Senior Lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Design: “Cognitive Labour, Technology and Waves of Migration in the Global VFX Industry” – the implication within his presentation is that not only do we innovate technology and physically change ourselves but the imperatives of changing technologies actually produces human migrations – and this in itself produces a second reason besides climate change to now begin to produce movements of humanity over the millennia – think of planetary colonization in the future. The centre piece of Leon’s talk will be the demonstration of a crowd-sourced, big-data based, migration visualisation that details the routes 13,000 professionals have taken across the world in search of work in the last 25 years.
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The art of technology: a case study approach to linking art, design and technology at key stage 4

The art of technology: a case study approach to linking art, design and technology at key stage 4

Towards mid January the pupils began to carry out the research phase of the project. A critical studies approach using the work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh was a vital part of this phase. Students visited the area to be re-designed and recorded their responses as notes and sketch drawings. They were also shown ways to discuss the brief in groups and ways of organising a design task. Slide and video presentations were used as teaching and learning aids where appropriate. Pupils made notes on how the design process had been used by others and discussed which of the issues raised were important to their own approach. At this point two professionals in the field of design made presentations to the pupils in order to underline the links between the Managing Director of a Construction Company which designs and builds commercial and domestic properties in the North West of England, the other was an Art Specialist with knowledge and expertise in the area of commissioning and developing public art works. Considerable time was spent ensuring that pupils used the research phase to get a thorough grasp of design principles and the constraints put on the design and make process 4. By mid February pupils were beginning to generate their own designs. The Art and Design classes used first hand stimuli based on observation work from natural forms. Their attention was drawn to line, shape, colour and
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An Interactive Model of Creative Design Behavior with 3D Optical Technology

An Interactive Model of Creative Design Behavior with 3D Optical Technology

4 An Interactive Model in Design with 3D Optical Technology Researcher creates an interactive model integrated four factors which are cognitive, creative, collaborative and pedagogical. This model proposed to improve user behavior and creative skill that enable better understanding of students and their intents through a theoretical framework (Fig. 5). Cognitive skills are the mental mechanisms that are used in the process of acquiring knowledge; these skills include reasoning, perception, and intuition. Reading and writing rely on a speci fic set of cognitive skills, such as attention, memory, symbolic thinking, and self-regulation. For example, when children learn to read and write, they continue to improve these skills, making them more purposeful and deliberate. Deliberate attention is required to differentiate between letters, even if they look alike, and to isolate speci fic portions of a word for encoding to decode it. Children must remember the previous words as they decode the subsequent words in a sentence. A teenager ’s cognitive skill set is made up of several mental skills, including auditory and visual processing, short- and long-term memory, comprehen- sion, logic and reasoning, and attention skills. Most college prep courses focus on academic materials and study habits. Meta-cognition allows teens to think about how they feel and what they are thinking. It involves being able to think about how one is perceived by others. It can also be used to develop strategies, also known as mnemonic devices, for improving learning.
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Exploring the mobile technology deployment process in a creative B2B service industry

Exploring the mobile technology deployment process in a creative B2B service industry

Despite the fact that differences across the cases appear to be critical for comparative analysis, all three cases have similarities worthy of mention. B2B creative companies demonstrate correspondence within the MTD routines. Particularly, planning the MTD is embedded within the MTD process in all three firms. Moreover, planning involves market intelligence generation, assessment of resources available to firms as well as diagnostics of organisational capabilities. Importantly, benchmarking capabilities to follow and learn from best practices of the MTD across industries exist in all selected firms. According to Day (1994), planning performed in the illustrated cases in conjunction with competition tracking forms a market-sensing capability. As a result, it is evident that the MTD process requires initial market-driven strategic orientation. However, Case I sees MT more as an operation-enabling tool. “You have to plan the application of mobile technologies at an operational level” (Case I). This approach is consistent with Leahmann and Fernandez (2007) tool view of IT where organisations consider MT as a single aspect of the varied enterprise functions. On the other hand, cases II and III re-design and re- define organisational routines around the MT resulting in remote cross-functional communication and decision-making. Lu and Ramamurthy (2011) emphasised that fixed networked and stationary character of IT infrastructure poses an obstacle for a firm to develop organisational agility. Cases II and III demonstrate that an ‘ensemble’ view of MTD that connects technical, people and data facets of the process facilitates development of organisational, particularly operational, adjustment agility (Lu and Ramamurthy, 2011) that allows creative firms to physically manage rapid changes in the market and demand structures through internal flexibility of business processes.
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Masters module on Art, Design and Technology in the Arab States

Masters module on Art, Design and Technology in the Arab States

The project aims at bridging the gap between university spheres of computer science and that of creative practice. Taking into consideration, that opportunities for learning across multiple disciplines are less common in the Arab region, as most universities and educational institutions mainly focus on established disciplines such as art, design, computer sciences, etc., the master module will contribute to the establishment of teaching material combining creative practices, design and computing. In the long run, it will help building an academic structure in order to formalise the development of the emerging alliance of ICT with culture and design and assist new creative expressions reflecting and preserving the cultural diversity of the region.
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A Computational Model of Creative Design as a Sociocultural Process Involving the Evolution of Language

A Computational Model of Creative Design as a Sociocultural Process Involving the Evolution of Language

The experiments described in this thesis are implemented in multi-agent simulations to simulate the communication between speaker-agents (initiators) and listener-agents (recipients) in guessing games and that between client-agents and designer-agents in gen- eration games to evolve artificial languages for conceptual designing. In the evolution of artificial languages, weighted associations between utterances and meanings, Holo- graphic Reduced Representations and Weighted Context Free Grammar are utilised to represent topics, designs and association rules. To evolve communication from random selection to specific selection of players, short term memory is used to store and update the newest successful or failed communications among agents. To categorise continuous input samples or generated works during simulation, long term memory is adopted to store categories, prototypes, association rules and instances and update them based on several machine learning algorithms including Self-Organising Map (SOM), the network based on Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) and Growing Neural Gas (GNG). Inter- estingness is evaluated using hedonic functions based on the Wundt Curve and its sine curve variation with the measurement of difference between prototype and designs using cosine similarity and the Euclidean distance.
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