Top PDF Introducing a Stakeholder Management Methodology into the EU

Introducing a Stakeholder Management Methodology into the EU

Introducing a Stakeholder Management Methodology into the EU

This paper describes the introduction of the Stakeholder Circle® methodology (SHC) and software into the European Union by Tiba Managementberatung GmbH. The methodology was developed in Australia and initially targeted at the North American project management market. A partnership with a German consulting company, Tiba Managementberatung GmbH was formed in 2006 to introduce the methodology into the European market place. This paper describes the results of the training and implementation efforts in Europe and discusses the question: is there is a common ‘EU culture’, or do differences in both PM maturity and national and organisational culture make the concept of an ‘EU marketplace’ for project management processes and tools a dangerous illusion?
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Study on the Eligibility of Introducing Hybrid-Drive Buses into the Public Passenger Transport

Study on the Eligibility of Introducing Hybrid-Drive Buses into the Public Passenger Transport

Research on the use of environmentally friendly buses in Europe [1] shows that approximately 30 % of registered buses meet the Euro I and II standard, slightly more than 30 % of buses meet the Euro III standard and just a little more than 30 % of buses meet the Euro IV and V or energy efficient vehicles (EEV) standard. As defined in the EU Strategies [2] and [3], the objective is to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to be at least 60 % lower than in the year 1990 and be firmly on the path towards zero. The operational program of measures to decrease GHG emissions by 2020 in Slovenia [4] sets as an objective that traffic emissions are to be reduced by 15 % by 2030 compared to 2008. Research in the field of alternative drives in buses shows that there are two different architectures suitable for hybrid vehicles – series and parallel architecture [5]. Research [6] shows the simulation of energy-conversion efficiency of hybrid drives, while research [7] shows the
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European Dialogue  The Magazine for European Integration November/December 1998/6

European Dialogue The Magazine for European Integration November/December 1998/6

Introducing the information handbook for EU delegations in the candidate countries produced by the DGIA information unit, the director-general Gunter Burghardt described the EU 's new po[r]

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Legal and environmental aspects of authorizing edible insects in the European Union

Legal and environmental aspects of authorizing edible insects in the European Union

Nutritional values of different foodstuffs have been examined on a number of occasions (see e.g. Skibniewska 2013; Kocková and Valík 2014; Vrbiková 2014). However, so far, little attention has been paid to the legal aspects of introducing edible insects. The existing studies on legal aspects of food security refer to the old EU legislation on the so-called novel foods, but they do not reflect its updated wording adopted in late 2015 (Belluco 2013; Rumpold 2013; van der Spiegel 2013). Food security has been addressed particularly with respect to developing countries ( Jeníček and Grófová 2015a, b). Nevertheless, in developing countries a manual collection of edible insects in the wild is more likely (Morales-Ramos et al. 2014) than a mass farming of mini-livestock under controlled conditions that may emerge into a growing sector of the agricultural economy. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive over- view of the legal background of authorizing edible insects in the European Union, taking into account the environmental impacts thereof.
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Management of Stakeholder in Infrastructure Projects

Management of Stakeholder in Infrastructure Projects

A stakeholder is either an individual, group or organization who is impacted by the outcome of a project. They have an interest in the success of the project, and can be within or outside the organization that is sponsoring the project. They can have a positive or negative influence on the project. The checklist of stakeholders in a construction project is often large and would include the owners and users of facilities, project managers, designers, shareholders, legal authorities, employees, subcontractors, suppliers, process and service providers, competitors, banks, insurance companies, media, community representatives, neighbours, general public, government establishments, visitors, customers, regional development agencies, the natural environment, the press, pressure groups, civic institutions, etc. The number of stakeholders involved or interested in the project can dramatically increase the complexity and uncertainty of the situation. Each stakeholder usually has different interests and priorities that can place them in conflict or disagreements with the project.
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Prerequisites of Stakeholder Management in an Organization

Prerequisites of Stakeholder Management in an Organization

The paper presents the organization as a collaboration of multiple and diverse constituencies and interests, referred to as stakeholders. Stakeholder approach in the organization integrates stakeholder relationships within a company’s resource base, industry setting, and sociopolitical arena into a single analytical framework. The key relationships for a business go far beyond the relationships with its customers and include the relationships with its employees, as well as those with suppliers and partners, investors and market analysts, and even government regulators, trade associations and other entities that influence the general business climate in which a given business operates. In all cases stakeholders are inseparable part of management strategy. This concept helps people and organizations to agree upon joint goals, participation, boundaries and benefit, i.e. flexibly to plan the activity.
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Development of Stakeholder Relationships by Integrating Their Needs into  Organization’s Goals and Objectives

Development of Stakeholder Relationships by Integrating Their Needs into Organization’s Goals and Objectives

Collaborative relationships with stakeholders can be a source of opportunity and competitive advantage. Rela- tionships can increase an organization’s stability in a tur- bulent environment, enhance its control over changing circumstances, and expand its capacity rather than dimin- ish it (Svendsen, 1998). There are significant advantages to taking a more integrated, company-wide approach to identifying and building strategically important stake- holder relationships (Limerick, 1998; Beccerra, 1999). In addition to increasing organizational effectiveness and consistency of response, this kind of holistic approach also allows and organization to build on synergies that occur when positive relationships with one stakeholder group, such as local community, start to have a beneficial impact on other stakeholder group, such as customers.
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A stakeholder reporting model for semi autonomous public sector agencies: the case of the workers' compensation agency in Newfoundland, Canada

A stakeholder reporting model for semi autonomous public sector agencies: the case of the workers' compensation agency in Newfoundland, Canada

Title WCB and Government Accountability Ladder of Accountability Stakeholder Salience Ladder of Stakeholder Management and Engagement Additional Public Sector Characteristics Categories [r]

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Benchmarking in the EU: Lessons from the EU Emissions Trading System for the Global Climate Change Agenda. CEPS Task Force Report. 11 June 2010

Benchmarking in the EU: Lessons from the EU Emissions Trading System for the Global Climate Change Agenda. CEPS Task Force Report. 11 June 2010

In parallel with the Swedish presidency, it has been my privilege over the past six months to chair the CEPS Task Force on “Benchmarking for the EU ETS and Beyond” with a view to providing key messages and policy recommendations, first to the European Commission, then to the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers and also to a wider range of international stakeholders. The work has been made possible thanks to the members of the Task Force, including a wide range of business, industry, research and environmental NGOs, who gave their expertise and time, presenting the viewpoints of different interests. The Task Force is particularly indebted to Hubert van den Bergh, who by contributing his practical experience with the Dutch and Flemish energy-efficiency benchmarking covenants, set the scene for the Task Force discussions. I would also like to thank the European Commission, Ecofys, member state officials and industry representatives who generously shared their expertise and reflections, and through their contributions and advice, helped us to remain focused on what soon became a rapidly emerging agenda. Last but not least, we were fortunate enough to be able to rely on CEPS’ support throughout the Task Force.
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Structuring User Experience Design with Affective Concerns

Structuring User Experience Design with Affective Concerns

The 100 recruited users consumed the 30experience design outcomes and pro- vided a score for each (100 marks as the highest and 1 mark as the lowest). The average score for the experience designs under the guidelines of introducing af- fective concerns (Team A) was 86 marks, while the average score for the expe- rience designs not under the guidelines of introducing affective concerns (Team B) was 53 marks. The feedback provided by the users can be highlighted as fol- lows. The users indicated that the human-centered solutions, which were gener- ated under the affective concern guidelines, were much more enjoyable, because the presentations of visual and audio elements were considerably more effective in satisfying their needs. In addition, the field observation on the design process of the design teams revealed that Team A, which adopted the guidelines for in- troducing affective concerns, was much more effective in generating creative experience designs than was Team B (Tables 2-4).
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Project stakeholder management by the contractor: how to achieve satisfying project stakeholder management by the contractor in a SCC context

Project stakeholder management by the contractor: how to achieve satisfying project stakeholder management by the contractor in a SCC context

In this paragraph the first and most extensive definition of PSM available in the literature will be outlined. In his Handbook for PSM (Wesselink, 2010), Wesselink describes Project Stakeholder Management as follows: “the combination of stakeholder management and issue management” (p.48) with stakeholder management being: “a process in which the efforts/activities of the organization members are coordinated and controlled towards the achievement of the common goal. (…) An organization developing a relationship with its stakeholders that suits the interests of those stakeholders, the organization and the organizational activities. Based upon mutual respect for each other’s interests and aimed at the achievement of added value for all parties.” And issue management being: “a concept stemming from corporate business. It aims at scanning the business environment for issues they face and to which the company wants to be prepared for. (…) Issues are not isolated and do not just pop up. Issues have grown from a trend or have created this trend. Meijers uses the following definition: “The activation, maintenance and control of relationships between the project and its environment, at the service of the project” (Meijers, 2009, p. 6). Krol describes Project Stakeholder Management as: “The active involvement of project stakeholders to recognize and achieve mutual goals, and to keep control over the implementation of projects” (Krol, 2009, p. 10). Koppenjan, professor of Public Administration at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam speaking about PSM: “By actively involving the project environment in the project and taking the interests of stakeholders into account, support and trust is built, through which the project implementation runs smoother. The contribution of information and ideas enriches the content of the project: in this way, the result can be a common project that realizes a wide range of social and public values” (Kennis in het Groot, 2010a, p. 21)
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The Allies Of Others: How Stakeholders’ Relationships Shape Non-Market Strategy

The Allies Of Others: How Stakeholders’ Relationships Shape Non-Market Strategy

Since the salience of CSP issues is determined by managerial perception of stakeholders (Mitchell et al., 1997) within the corresponding field, our operationalization of these fields must be readily observable by managers. Consistent with this objective, we identify membership based upon the population of stakeholders identified with CSP issues in a country (e.g., environmental, human rights and labor issues) connected by actions or statements reported in the media. Media is an information intermediary that provides stimuli that affect impression formation (Pollock and Rindova, 2003) and “influences decision makers by identifying the topics, issues, activities, and events that are perceived as notable and salient,” (Aharonson and Bort, 2015: 313). Acknowledging sources of bias in media-reported events (e.g. ideological biases, over-reporting of negative events), we do not claim all stakeholder ties will be reported by media. Instead, we suggest an approach that relies on media conforms with stakeholder salience being a 'socially constructed' reality (Mitchell et al., 1997). Organizational researchers have shown what stakeholders know about organizations is largely shaped by what the media reports about them (Deephouse, 2000; Petkova, Rindova, and Gupta, 2013; Pollock and Rindova, 2003). Therefore, while other studies have relied on archival data, such as the financial resources at the disposal of an NGO, to measure stakeholder salience (Eesley and Lenox, 2006), we believe studying media-reported stakeholder fields better reflects the limited perceptual energy managers can devote to understanding their stakeholder environment (Mitchell et al., 1997).
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Introducing risk management into the grid

Introducing risk management into the grid

Service Level Agreements (SLAs) are explicit statements about all expectations and obligations in the business part- nership between customers and providers. They have been introduced in Grid computing to overcome the best effort approach, making the Grid more interesting for commercial applications. However, decisions on negotiation and system management still rely on static approaches, not reflecting the risk linked with decisions. The EC-funded project ”As- sessGrid” aims at introducing risk assessment and manage- ment as a novel decision paradigm into Grid computing. This paper gives a general motivation for risk management and presents the envisaged architecture of a ”risk-aware” Grid middleware and Grid fabric, highlighting its function- ality by means of three showcase scenarios.
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Improved methodology for introducing threatened hatchery reared fish

Improved methodology for introducing threatened hatchery reared fish

Use of tank cells by groups of eight eel-tailed catfish fingerlings before (control only) and after introduction of predator (Murray cod).. Results – eel-tailed catfish[r]

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Assessment of stakeholder views on tourism management in a Venezuelan national park

Assessment of stakeholder views on tourism management in a Venezuelan national park

stage was a 'post-workshop', where INPARQUES drew on the comments made in the workshop about the management plan. This considered comments "which are deemed valid and compatible with the Park's Law, [and] discarded those that raised situations not compatible with the park's original objectives" (Delgado, 1992:151, bold by the author). The final version of the management plan was then passed to the government for approval. As highlighted in Delgado's remarks, the development of the current management plan was not participative, and stakeholder inputs were limited to a fairly tokenistic consultation, particularly so given that interviewees for this present study explained that the 'public consultation workshop' took place over only two days. The initial implementation of this management plan also appears to have been carried out in a fairly authoritarian fashion. This helps explain Degado's remark that immediately after starting to implement the management plan relationships between INPARQUES and other park stakeholders became "immensely eroded due to conflicts between those with political interests and the technical regulations im posed by INPARQUES" (1992:151, bold by the author). More recently it has been asserted that the lack of participation by the local community in decision-making was a serious problem for the park's management (AECI Consultant Group, 1998; Ananda, 1998; Arreaza, 1998; Asoproroque, 1999; Gutic, 1997; Ornat, 1997). The need to create participatory mechanisms has also been highlighted by several commentators, as well as more recently by the park's Central Co-ordinating Authority (CCA) (AUA, 2000; AUA, 2001).
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Introducing Routine External Cephalic Version for the Management of the Malpresenting Fetus Near Term

Introducing Routine External Cephalic Version for the Management of the Malpresenting Fetus Near Term

Introducing Routine External Cephalic Version for the Management of the Malpresenting Fetus Near Term ORIGINAL ARTICLE Introducing Routine External Cephalic Version for the Management of the Malpresen[.]

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Stakeholder participation and stakeholder protest: On the planned revision of the EU Organic regulation

Stakeholder participation and stakeholder protest: On the planned revision of the EU Organic regulation

One potentially far-reaching change in the cooperation between the EU Commission and the sector is certainly the downgrading of the existing Annexes to the EU Organic Regulation into implementation provisions. These Annexes regulate the numerous details which quite practically define what actually makes organic agriculture organic. According to the draft of the new regulation, these detailed descriptions of organic agriculture should be placed in provisions on implementation which in the future can be determined by the Commission using the Management Committee procedure. Compared to the current Legislation Committee procedure, the position of the Commission will be strengthened. This reduces the sector’s potential influence on their specific contents. It is no mere administrative simplification, because it shifts the responsibility of determining what makes organic agriculture distinctively organic towards the EU Commission. Some actors in the sector have commented on these changes in drastic terms, feeling that the sector is being disenfranchised, “having its child taken away”. In other words, from the perspective of many stakeholders, by shutting out the private sector the ground is being prepared for subordination to state control.
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Introducing Autonomous Car Methodology in WSN

Introducing Autonomous Car Methodology in WSN

of Computer Science and Engineering, Gurunanak Institute of Technology, WBUT 1 157/F, Nilgunj Road, Sodepur, Panihati, Kolkata - 700114, West Bengal, India2. Student, Dept.[r]

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Identification of stakeholder perspectives on future flood management in the Rhine basin using Q methodology

Identification of stakeholder perspectives on future flood management in the Rhine basin using Q methodology

expected to exceed 16 500 m 3 /s under future climate change. The warrants in a policy context contain goals that are wor- thy to be promoted, which in turn depend on general values or worldviews and on specific, local interests (cf. Fischer, 1995; Sabatier, 1998). The latter were elicited indirectly since they are usually implied in the arguments and actions of the stakeholders concerned rather than applied consciously, and asking directly for values may result in unreliable artifi- cial answers. Instead, the shared perspectives were analyzed in order to find underlying values that could explain them. In all perspectives, safety seems to be a central value that should be protected now and in the future. Moreover, all factors aim for more active involvement of NGOs and the public, but it is unclear whether public participation is seen as a means for empowerment and direct democracy, or as a means to ed- ucate the public and obtain support for management, which would be compatible with a government and science centered worldview (cf. Mostert, 2005; Webler and Tuler, 2006).
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The ECOUTER methodology for stakeholder engagement in translational research

The ECOUTER methodology for stakeholder engagement in translational research

E2, the ‘Shopping Centre ECOUTER’ tested ECOU- TER as a tool for public engagement at the local level. The topic was the use of personal health records for re- search, following the then recently abandoned initial rollout of the care (dot) data initiative in the English NHS. On a single day in November 2014, a booth was set up in a large urban shopping centre in the UK offer- ing members of the public tablet computers and a large screen monitor with which to consider the question, Your medical records: handover or hands off? Seven fa- cilitators initiated micro-discussions with over 100 members of the public, as a result of which 83 contri- butions were made to the mind map. Shopping Centre ECOUTER demonstrated the efficacy of the ECOUTER methodology when conducted face-to-face and on a topic involving experiential expertise. Given their close proximity timewise and their similarities of topic, the results of the Shopping Centre and P 3 G ECOUTERs were analysed jointly, revealing a high degree of con- ceptual overlap. Despite differences in the two originat- ing questions, multiple intersecting themes emerged yielding a conceptual schema comprising four areas: definitions and boundaries; oversight mechanisms; threats; and new knowledge. Nonetheless, it was signifi- cant that some issues were emphasised more by the public Shopping Centre ECOUTER participants: con- cern about confidentiality and anonymity; concern about exploitation for profit; and, support for data used for research. ECOUTER enabled engagement and facili- tated the surfacing of diverse points of view from stake- holder communities of differing ‘status’.
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