Top PDF Teaching bioinformatics: A student-centred and problem based approach

Teaching bioinformatics: A student-centred and problem based approach

Teaching bioinformatics: A student-centred and problem based approach

The third kind of bridge is the hands-on use of major online bioinformatics services, including national and international resources such as ANGIS BioManager (Australia), NCBI (USA), EMBL (Europe), ExPASy (Sweden), and S-Star.org (Multinational) (see Useful Links below). There are hundreds of programs available through BioManager. NCBI was one of the first online bioinformatics resources and is still a world leader. EMBL is a major European bioinformatics resource. ExPASy is the protein sequence analysis expert system, which contains a large number of modular programs. S-Star.org is a pioneering international bioinformatics education initiative, which involves institutions from around the world (Ping et al. 2002). Students are required to use these platforms in their own time, after receiving teacher-guided help in class during tutorial sessions.
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Contextual Factors in the Open Approach Based Mathematics Classroom Affecting Development of Students’ Metacognitive Strategies

Contextual Factors in the Open Approach Based Mathematics Classroom Affecting Development of Students’ Metacognitive Strategies

As for the research methodology, ethnographic research was conducted, and Begle’s conceptual framework (1969), which focused on observing the nature of occurrences, was employed. The researcher had conducted participatory classroom observa- tions from the academic years 2008 to 2010. Data were col- lected in the academic year of 2010 in order to analyze findings. The target groups consisted of one teacher who was a student as a mathematics teaching practitioner at a school from Khon Kaen University and four elementary school students in grade 1 aged 6 to 7 years (1 male and 3 females) from Koo Kham Pit- tayasan School. Data were collected from the following 3 learning units totaling 6 study periods: addition (2), subtraction (2), and addition or subtraction? Qualitative data analysis pro- cedures were based on analyzing videos, protocols, students’ written work, and time units for dealing with activities and narrative description. The analysis on the teacher’s teaching behavior and students’ problem solving behavior was based on the following 4 open approach-based teaching steps (Inprasitha, 2010).
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Eclecticism or Principled Eclecticism

Eclecticism or Principled Eclecticism

The introduction of a new mandatory policy for the teaching of English at the higher education level in China, College English Curriculum Requirements (CECR, published in 2004), had the intention of modernising and improving the quality of English teaching at the tertiary level in China. The policy had a focus on student cen- tred approaches to learning and the use of technology to support this process. This paper reports on a study that investigated the views of teachers, administrators and policy makers about the intended pedagogical shift em- bedded in the policy and the success of the policy in achieving this goal. The paper attempts to clarify how lec- turers in higher education in China have been oriented by the CECR towards pedagogical change. To achieve this purpose, the paper reviews current issues in the context of English teaching at tertiary level in China and at- tempts to frame them in a conceptualisation of eclecticism and principled eclecticism. Then, the paper analyses the responses of teachers, administrators and policy makers, based on an analysis framework developed by Ma- ton (2004) from the work of Bourdieu (1993) and Bernstein (2000), to uncover the relationship between the pol- icy and the reality. The study found that while teachers are eager to make change themselves, in reality, the re- quirement of a student centred approach and new technical teaching in the policy, challenges teachers’ current knowledge in terms of their current training in understanding curriculum and syllabus, their knowledge of prin- cipled eclecticism and computer teaching, and how to deal with textbook teaching and the College English Test. The paper concludes that there is a gap between the policy and reality, and that a gap exists therefore between eclecticism and principled eclecticism in pedagogy in tertiary English teaching in the context of China. Keywords: Eclecticism, Principled Eclecticism, Tertiary English Teaching
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EVALUATING A STUDENT CENTRED APPROACH TO TEACHING AND LEARNING ON A POST GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL MODULE

EVALUATING A STUDENT CENTRED APPROACH TO TEACHING AND LEARNING ON A POST GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL MODULE

Responses from LMDP students were consistent with research, in that audio feedback was valued for being ‘primarily rooted in detail, clarity and affected influence’ (Blackburn, Stroud and Taylor, 2014, p.266). Tutors, who additionally valued its advantages of speed and relative ease of interpretation, were therefore encouraged to continue with the process. Although a small minority of students preferred written feedback to audio or wanted both, given time and other resource constraints it is likely that the tutors will take a utilitarian perspective and persist with the current approach. Responses to the paper-based module evaluation survey suggest that students are more than satisfied with content, teaching and organisation for the module and other factors within the control of the tutor. One hundred per cent of respondents strongly agreed or agreed that they were satisfied with their experience of the module. Although the research instrument is crude in that allows for only rudimentary quantitative analysis, the results are undoubtedly encouraging.
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How lecturers experience student centred teaching

How lecturers experience student centred teaching

Researcher: ‘Why do you want them to have a variety of perspectives, a balanced perspective?’ ‘…I think they come in sometimes and they see things black and white, you know, em…they think that all the problems in the clinical area can be solved (Approach C). And first of all it’s like recognising an ethical problem, whether it’s ethical, you know, is it an ethical problem? But, ‘We should just do this and we should just do that’ (Approaches A & B). And then you begin to say, ‘Well, what if?’ you know, ‘It’s not always that black and white. There are other things happening here,’ you know and you have to try and get them to explore other options. And it’s all about, in ethics we say there’s no right and wrong, there are some rights and wrongs, but say generally there’s none. You can justify either side, so you need to be able to look at it from a broad view, and you need to be able to take the client’s perspective into account. Just because you think something’s right, it doesn’t mean to say a client’s going to say it’s right. And as a nurse em you’ve got a certain amount of power over a client and you have no right to force your views onto clients. That type of thing that you have to try and understand both views (Approach D). You might have your own view (Approach C), but I suppose it’s about exploring different views with them rather than, you know, this em, what is it that one of them put in their evaluation form? ‘What has ethics got to do with nursing?’ you know, it’s that type of thing (laughs) you’re sometimes fighting against. And a lot of them, you’re not, well, I would say that maybe about 25% of them put on the form, especially about responsibility and accountability and, and the ethics, that it makes more sense and that they can relate it to their practice. Whereas before they just didn’t really know what this module had to do with nursing. So, it’s all about getting them to explore their own understandings of things and trying to think about their position. Because, you know, a lot of them don’t realise how powerful they are. Even at the early stage you know in their career in relation to the patients and it’s getting them to think about that.’ (Approach D) (AN9, F)
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Assessable case based activities: towards student centred teaching in information systems

Assessable case based activities: towards student centred teaching in information systems

Case study problems were broken into a series of stages, consistent with the system development life cycle, which students would work through culminating in formulation of a DSS for a realistic problem. The key feature of a problem based learning approach, group mediation of learning, could be incorporated after individual work on each stage. Group mediation is interpreted as students actively participating in tasks which uncover misunderstandings and exploring alternative conceptions by interacting with fellow learners. The problems would provide a clear link between assessment items and learning objectives. Using this approach would integrate the teaching and learning activities with assignments emphasising learning the process of modelling. Potentially constructively aligning student activities, assessment and desired learning outcomes.
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Teaching Online: A Theory-based Approach to Student Success

Teaching Online: A Theory-based Approach to Student Success

Concerns about a lack of face-to-face contact with students, a focus on grading rather than teaching, and limited expertise with technology or needed pedagogical strategies, may contribute to instructor reluctance to teach online. The interaction between the instructor and learner and among learners affects the quality and success of online learning, and the learner’s ability to master the outcomes associated with the targeted content or skill area as well as the broad outcomes of higher education such as critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication (Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2015). Success in distance courses is associated with the learners’ ability to take responsibility for controlling the factors that affect learning (Andrade, 2012; Andrade & Bunker, 2011). This paper presents a framework for instructor training for online teaching, and outlines specific strategies for community building and instructor response aimed at developing learner autonomy. The approach is based on the theories of transactional distance—structure, dialogue, and autonomy (Moore, 2013), self-regulated learning—forethought, performance, self-reflection (Zimmerman, 2002), and collaborative control—peer and instructor collaboration to control factors that affect learning (White, 2003). The theories provide a foundation for training and guide instructors in establishing a quality online teaching and learning experience. The approach is illustrated with a teacher training for online English language instructors.
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Activity Based Learning System in Higher Education: A Student Centred Approach

Activity Based Learning System in Higher Education: A Student Centred Approach

Constructivist approach corresponds to learning by doing assuming that the more repeatedly one does something, the more efficient they become at it. It consists on different forms and activities including cooperative learning, experiential learning, problem-based learning and inquiry learning (Hussain & Sultan, 2010). However, it is based on active involvement of learners and their interactions for creation of new knowledge. Critical thinking, problem solving approach and analytical skills are assumed to be the essential constructs of higher education graduates. Equipped with such faculties and skills they construct new knowledge based on their previous experiences and involvement in learning process (Li, 2001).
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Student centred Teaching in Initial Teacher Education

Student centred Teaching in Initial Teacher Education

Educational Psychology were chosen in advance by students based on their perceived needs as novice teachers. In a similar approach to Rogers’ use of the question ‘what would you like to learn about today?’, this choice was initially facilitated through in-class brainstorming on the theme of ‘times I wished I had a psychologist beside me in a school setting to support me’. This initial discussion yielded too many potential areas of study to be covered within the lectures available to the class, so a poll was set up on the class on-line learning system ‘Moodle’, and all students could vote on which topics they felt would be most important to study. This democratic approach to curriculum development yielded a list of concerns very relevant to the practice of student and newly qualified teachers, including bereavement, trauma, motivation, bullying, positive psychology, giftedness, parental alcoholism, and the impact of technology and social media on children’s learning. In contrast to Rogers’ approach, it also allowed both the lecturer and students time to prepare for lectures, and limited the time spent deciding on a direction to one session, rather than having to allocate time to such discussion at the beginning of each lecture. The on-line element also ensured that decisions were not made only by those students with the strongest voices.
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Volume 9 | Issue 2 - 2019

Volume 9 | Issue 2 - 2019

Problem-based learning has gained great popularity among the world's top educational institutions since it is contributed to the development of students' professional skills. This article aimed to study the application of problem-based learning in pharmaceutical education and conduct a comparative analysis of its advantages as perceived by university students of the first and last years. In 2018, the authors conducted a study using mixed methods of a sociological survey (focus group discussions and anonymous questioning) among 423 students. As a result, they revealed the main advantages of problem-based learning associated with the use of real-life situations, which ensured the reliability of the material under the study, contributed to a better understanding of the topic and enabled the application of the knowledge acquired before. The authors also proved that students of the first and last years perceived the above- mentioned benefits in a different way. The study results can help to realize new educational approaches based on the student's needs. Keywords: problem-based learning, pharmaceutical education, active teaching methods, educational technologies, student-centered approach
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Problem based learning : adapting model of monitoring ans assessment towards changing to student centred learning

Problem based learning : adapting model of monitoring ans assessment towards changing to student centred learning

SCL can be implemented in many forms and approaches. One of the approaches that newly introduced in technical field in engineering is Problem Based Learning (PBL). Based on the local literatures, PBL presumes entering the second phase in universities’ delivery system after several pilot projects were conducted since 2004 (Ahmad and Jabar, 2007; Yusof et al., 2004; Yusof et al., 2005). But this approach is yet to be seen and piloted in the school delivery system. Since it was introduced as a new way of teaching physician in one of the medical schools in Canada (Rosenørn, 2006), its rapid growth and adapted variedly into various field of learning disciplines in the universities programs. Moreover, at international level, this approach has been implemented in K12 setting (Torp and Sage, 1998). But in our school delivery system, the teaching and learning is dominated by the traditional approaches. Thus, there is a clearly needs to revamp the current practice in school in line with global educational changes. Adapting PBL into current practice is not an easy task. Several elements of curriculum need to be scrutinized before it could be adapted into existing curriculum. The elements such as student profiles, curriculum requirements, institutional needs and even local industrial needs must involve a careful consideration in the curriculum development (Brodie and Borch, 2004; Kolmos et al., 2007). Likewise the method of teaching and learning must adapted according to the curriculum itself (Savin-Baden, 2004). It is within this context, as one of the curriculum elements, the proposed model of monitoring and assessment also according to several steps of development and this paper intended to describe in details in the following sections, before it suggested to be implemented in integrated living skills subject in lower secondary school level.
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The effectiveness of problem based learning: literature review

The effectiveness of problem based learning: literature review

PBL has been shown to have many positive learning outcomes. It fosters crucial skills for graduated nurses to provide the optimal nursing care. These skills include critical thinking, clinical reasoning, group collaboration, problem solving, professional knowledge construction,self-directed learning, and student motivation to learn. However, in order for PBL to work as intended, critical components of this approach should be ensured. For instance, thorough preparation for the faculty members, strong support for the administration that includes facilitating library access, equipped computer labs, and supporting faculty during the transition phases from NPBL to PBL curricula. The group size should be within the recommended number since large student samples makes it difficult for a PBL class to succeed. Embracing PBL without sufficient preparation could harm the learning process since both teacher and students struggle to cope with teaching approach. PBL showed positive learning outcomes in many countries worldwide, which shows this teaching method can be applicable in different setting if the curriculum reform was well planned and implemented. This literature review examined the impact of PBL on the learning process to show the applicability of this approach in different settings.
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Readiness in Implementing Student centred Learning (SCL): An Insight to Developing a Problem based Learning (PBL) Module

Readiness in Implementing Student centred Learning (SCL): An Insight to Developing a Problem based Learning (PBL) Module

SCL stands on the premise of (i) the reliance on active rather than passive learning, (ii) emphasis on deep learning and understanding, (iii) increased responsibility and accountability on the part of the student, (iv) increased sense of autonomy in the student, (v) interdependence between teacher and learner, (vi) mutual respect within the learner-teacher relationship, and (vii) a reflexive approach to the teaching and learning process on the part of both the teacher and the student. The shift from the emphasis on teaching to the emphasis on learning has accelerated the notion of SCL, implying thus that students should be actively constructing their own learning and be empowered to arrive at their learning goals. Most educators would agree that developing and implementing SCL has become more of a necessity and norm rather that an innovative approach in teaching and learning. The traditional classroom where student sit quietly while the teacher pour vast amount of knowledge is no longer relevant.
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Beyond binary thinking, knowing and teaching mathematics

Beyond binary thinking, knowing and teaching mathematics

In terms of the proficiency strands, the approach tends to immerse children in authentic projects without sufficiently scaffolding, or at least complementing, the immersion with conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, or de-cluttered representations. The primary criticism of this oppositional approach is not that it may not work and be beneficial for some students; rather, it is that it unnecessarily excludes other positions from a pedagogical repertoire that may ultimately be used to engage more students over a longer period of time, and can potentially limit students’ preparation to engage with higher mathematics learning in later years.
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Developing a student centred learning package using knowledge elicitation techniques

Developing a student centred learning package using knowledge elicitation techniques

Knowledge elicitation, although resource intensive, proved to be a useful methodology in collating and organising material for this web based package. The web site proved to be a useful learning tool because the content was well structured and the web designers were fully briefed about the design, format and navigation requirements. Students who were familiar with the use of the web and internet technologies were most enthusiastic about the package and were very positive about the use of web-based activities within this module. However, a small group of students did experience some difficulties with this mode of delivery and it is important that provision is made to ensure that they are encouraged to develop the skills required to use web-based activities to their full potential. The nature of the subject also has an important impact on the modes of delivery through this module. In several instances the strengths of the web were identified as the weaknesses of traditional lectures and vice versa. It is clear from the feedback received from this cohort that the best delivery mechanism was a careful balance between formal lectures and use of the web. More widespread use of web- based delivery is inevitable, but it is essential that the University carefully considers the needs of staff and students to ensure that web based delivery enriches the student experience. REFERENCES
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Five teacher profiles in student-centred curricula based on their conceptions of learning and teaching

Five teacher profiles in student-centred curricula based on their conceptions of learning and teaching

A limitation of our study is that we investigated two institutes with student-centred curricula in the Netherlands. Consequently, our findings cannot readily be generalized to other institutes and other countries. Secondly, the response rate on our electronic questionnaire was low, as 319 of 646 teachers (49.4%) filled in the questionnaire. However, re- sponders and non-responders were comparable on gender and discipline, both for the whole group and for the two medical institutes separately. Thirdly, the validation of the cluster-analysis was somewhat disappointing, although the five-cluster solution was appropriate with respect to mean- ing and distribution. Presumably, a larger scale sample from more medical schools is needed to validate the five-cluster solution. Another explanation might be that the cluster- analysis technique is inappropriate to discriminate properly between the teacher profiles. This might imply that qualitative research methods are better equipped to capture reality.
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The Relationship among Teaching Beliefs, Student Centred Teaching Concept and the Instructional Innovation

The Relationship among Teaching Beliefs, Student Centred Teaching Concept and the Instructional Innovation

Bruce [15] suggested that instructional innovation means to “learn” the interactive relationship between the “learners” and the “learning environment”, and adopt information technology in teaching by using proper stra- tegic skills, in the hope of generating better teaching efficacy. Wu [16] also suggested that instructional innova- tion meant teachers adopted diversified and lively teaching methods/contents in the teaching process, expecting to arouse students’ interest in learning, cultivating their proactive learning attitude, and improving their learning abilities. Lin [17] proposed that instructional innovation indicated teachers must be open-minded and have the ability of introspection. Also, they should have the ability of reflection, questioning, deconstruction, and recon- struction, using these abilities to guide students on the right learning path and cultivating students’ judgment and creativity.
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Augmenting Student Learning And Soft Skills Acquisition In Nursing: Effectiveness Of A Teaching Innovation In Anatomy And Physiology

Augmenting Student Learning And Soft Skills Acquisition In Nursing: Effectiveness Of A Teaching Innovation In Anatomy And Physiology

provides nearly 1,640,000 results in 0.49 seconds about the incredible edible cell project but none of these results discusses the genius behind its invention. An interesting point however is attributed to its use as an effective teaching strategy in basic education particularly in the K to 12 when teaching plant or animal biology. Most effective teaching strategies, on the other hand, can be viewed as effective once adequately and accurately implemented, and meticulously evaluated. In this study, the researcher employed the IECP to teach his Anatomy and Physiology class about the human cell. To make it more authentic experiential learning for students, the researcher also explored on the soft skills acquired by the first year nursing students from the said project. To make the study even more meaningful, the researcher also explored on the issues, concerns and problems encountered by the first year nursing students when the IECP was employed.
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Investigating the learner-centred approach in language teaching in Lesotho

Investigating the learner-centred approach in language teaching in Lesotho

To provide suitable opportunities for a variety of practical and creative activities aimed at personal development and in particular, the growth of positive attitudes to work (Ministry of Education 1992). Building on these goals stated in the various policies, the MOET developed a policy on the localisation of O’ level education so that curriculum and assessment would be locally developed instead of coming from University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES). The National Curriculum Development Centre (NCDC), which has a key responsibility for developing the national curriculum according to these goals and ensuring the availability of relevant instructional materials to meet the needs of the country, embarked on a curriculum review. This resulted in a new syllabus and recommendations. One of the recommendations was that the approach to teaching in all subjects should be learner-centred rather than teacher-centred. The subjects include the official languages of English and Sesotho (including language and literature) which this study focuses on. After the 1995 seminar, NCDC translated the educational aims into curriculum aims. This was done at a workshop where the stakeholders had to indicate what needs the curriculum was to address. At this time the learner-centred approach was included as part of the design (Ministry of Education 2002, p.21). In the language syllabi (both Sesotho and English) Ministry of Education (2002, p.7) the following aims are addressed. Students are expected to:
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Using a student centred approach to explore issues affecting student transition

Using a student centred approach to explore issues affecting student transition

In addition, orientation strategies were implemented in week 1 laboratories to facilitate student transition. There were 18 first year labs run by a teaching staff of six. The tutors were both full time staff and post-graduate students. Each lab class consisted of approximately 20 students. In the first week lab students were asked to form small discussion groups, in which they discussed and recorded their initial impressions of university and transition issues. The aim of the activity was to allow students the opportunity to share their experiences, feelings and the challenges they faced in their first week at university. Some groups gave themselves a name and this helped foster a sense of connectedness between group members. They were also asked to note down group members’ names as the groups were to be reformed in week 4 classes.
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