Top PDF Thinking, Doing, Talking Science

Thinking, Doing, Talking Science

Thinking, Doing, Talking Science

The central approach of TDTS is summarised in a conceptual graphic (Figure 1). This graphic acted as a point of reference when training trainers and teachers on the programme. It illustrates the ‘talking’ and ‘doing’ strategies that are intended to support higher order thinking. ‘Practical Prompts for Thinking’ are short, accessible teacher demonstrations that are designed to intrigue pupils and also act as discussion starters within science lessons. ‘Bright Ideas Time’ are slots of ten minutes or less dedicated to discussion of a prompt which is often a question with no correct answer that allows pupils to think deeply and creatively. An important aspect of TDTS is that when pupils conduct practical work (in the ‘Practical Investigations’ and ‘Practical Problem Solving’) they do not record everything about the activity but only what is necessary to demonstrate their progress towards the particular objective of the activity which might be ‘to present the results in an appropriate manner’, ‘to plan a fair test’, or ‘to make a prediction with a scientific reason’.
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Thinking/Doing the ‘F’ Word: On Power in Feminist Methodologies

Thinking/Doing the ‘F’ Word: On Power in Feminist Methodologies

In listening to all the papers in Belfast, and in reviewing the published versions of those that follow, it became apparent to us that interest primarily lay with the second set of questions we had set, that is, those more explicitly focused on grounded research. Given the fact that our own interest in thinking/doing the ‘F’ word was driven and shaped by our particular research contexts, this focus is perhaps none too surprising: we might well expect other feminist geographers to ground and reground conceptual issues through their fieldwork. And yet, these papers do speak implicitly to the first set of questions by virtue of the fact that there simply is no anxiety apparent as to what constitutes a “distinct” feminist, critical edge to research. Instead, there is a sense of empowerment here in the way that these researchers draw upon a body of work labelled “feminist” that is diverse, at times contradictory and certainly overlaps on occasion with other bodies of work. The result is a collection of papers that attempt to use that work in a productive manner by pushing further feminist debates on a variety of materially-grounded concepts.
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Un thinking the West: The spirit of doing Black Theology of Liberation in decolonial times

Un thinking the West: The spirit of doing Black Theology of Liberation in decolonial times

De Gruchy said this while reflecting on Tutu’s proposal for wealth tax and reminisces about ‘the reaction of angry whites using ill-informed arguments and giving us those gut-feelings, to more reasoned discussion about the issues Tutu has raised’ (2011:2 of 4). Weak thought indeed. These idols, which have continued to hamper our reconciliation, include race, the land, money and the state. Some or many white people have such an ingrained passion for the land they took from black people and made ‘the white man’s land’ out of that they are willing to die for it. The centralised goal in much of their actions during the apartheid and colonial periods was often financial. White people took to using black people as cheap labour, refusing to spend state resources on black people, oppressing black people in every way including financially, to make money. This love for money is one that was seemingly more important than humanity and sacrificed their relationships with other human beings. The abandonment of such idols and ways of thinking is a ‘turning away’ – a conversion according to Kritzinger. Such a conversion is paramount for ‘rehumanisation’, i.e. dignification of both black and white people. Unfortunately the structures that entrench these idols remain intact in South Africa post- 1994. The structural idols of whiteness persist in South Africa and the world today, the global system of apartheid. After all, what is racism without these idols?
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Learning, Thinking and Living Tokyo. Doing urban research in cultures radically different to that of our own

Learning, Thinking and Living Tokyo. Doing urban research in cultures radically different to that of our own

As such, the project has explicitly not celebrated efficiency. That made us able to find allies in the depths of thinking such as those of Hélène Cixous, whose ways of reading (which can be translated into the ways of reading that immoderate urban text of ours) deliberately focus “not on a strategically selected detail but on the text in its entirety” (Andermatt Conley, 1992). Such an unorthodox approach to urban research, in which we openly argued for inclusion of the summarily proscribed subjectivity of the researcher, has also found strong support in the latest developments in life sciences. As Sandra Mitchell eloquently explains, in order “to begin to understand many aspects of our complex world … we need to expand our conceptual frameworks to accommodate contingency, dynamic robustness, and deep uncertainty” (Mitchell, 2012). Complex realities, “simply”, need an intellectual apparatus of matching complexity.
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Thinking, doing, feeling: capabilities in relation to decision making and transitions beyond school in the UK

Thinking, doing, feeling: capabilities in relation to decision making and transitions beyond school in the UK

Rita (white female, Riverdale, EMA recipient) explained that she was not ready to apply for university on leaving college. She wanted to enjoy life and travel around the country. She said it was important for her to have time to ‘play’ but that she may consider going to university at a future point in time. Rita’s comments struck a poignant chord as she emphasised the relative lack of ‘play’ in many young people’s lives. This point of transition between school and college and between youth and adulthood is constructed around decision-making and an expectation of knowing about the future. Play is not seriously considered within education policy for post- school transitions and, for example, enjoying a university social life is incidental to the government’s role for education in their socio-economic agenda. On the other hand, as seen in the statistics presented earlier, enjoyment and socialising are integral to the way many young people think about their futures. Rita’s comments served as an important reminder of the many different ways of being and doing that are of value to members of society of all ages. Indeed, Nussbaum identifies ‘play’ as one of the ten central human capabilities defining it as, ‘Being able to laugh, to play, to enjoy recreational activities’ (Nussbaum, 2005:44).
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Thinking the unthinkable doing away with the library catalogue

Thinking the unthinkable doing away with the library catalogue

Meanwhile, more and more users had been finding their way to our licensed journals through larger and stronger search engines like Google Scholar: freely available on the internet and containing massive amounts of scientific material. And our users also switched to databases we paid for, such as Web of Science and Scopus. Our statistics showed that the use of our library catalogue and Omega remained stable, whereas the use of our licensed journals was growing, indicating that our users increasingly approached articles through other ways than our Library discovery tools. Figure 2 shows the search behaviour of Utrecht users over the years, relative to the situation in 2006. The number of searches in our catalogue and Omega (the two bottom lines, light brown and red) stays more or
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Soil Science Lesson Plan for the Cal Poly Learn By Doing Lab

Soil Science Lesson Plan for the Cal Poly Learn By Doing Lab

16 thinking outside the box were necessities. In 2008, the “Dig It! The Secrets of Soil” exhibit opened at the Smithsonian NMNH. After two successful years at the museum, the exhibit was closed and reopened as a traveling exhibit until 2014. In preparation for the future of soil science and the SSSA, six goals were created to maintain and increase interest in the field. The goals were to embrace the public, strong branding of the SSSA with soil science, expand the political presence of soil science, branch out to related disciplines and scientific associations, rethink delivery of soils information, and develop a leading think tank on soil (Drohan et. al., 2010).
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Introduction: Reading and writing; talking and thinking

Introduction: Reading and writing; talking and thinking

We begin, not with reading, writing or reasoning, but with talk, which is a more complicated business than most people realize. Of course, being unaware of the full complexity of talk will not stop you communicating effectively in writing. However, it means that you will not be able to take account of the differences between communicating in speech and doing so in writing. As a result you may be less good at conveying your meanings in writing than you might be other- wise. Indeed, some of the most common problems that students have in writing arise because they have failed to think about these distinctions.
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Teaching science doing science: analysis of secondary students’ perception of science teaching

Teaching science doing science: analysis of secondary students’ perception of science teaching

Nevertheless, 57.5% of the students reported enjoyed the way their science classes were taught. In the first categorization of responses, the primary findings reveal that investigative activities were seen as tools to help assimilate knowledge and that these activities gave rise to problem situations, organization of thoughts, and making and sharing arguments (communication), as expressed by student A regarding the importance of the investigative methodology to consolidate knowledge: "Perfect and always useful, helps to consolidate teaching.It’s a way of sharing knowledge”. However, for knowledge to be consolidated, teachers must stimulate their students to explore and express their opinions.In doing so, teachers stimulate them to want knowledge and pursueit. According to Moreira (1999), with this teaching attitude students assume the role of receivers of knowledge, that is, agents of their own learning, thereby developing autonomy. This learning autonomy was observed in student B’s statement: “Very interesting, students feel responsible and important as they conduct research and discover the world around them”. This shows that the teaching methodology means more than changing one set of theories for another; first and foremost, it means clearly determining what the theories consist of. In this respect, Driver et al., (1999) stated the following: Teaching science involves introducing children and adolescents to a different way of thinking about the natural world and explaining it; it means becomingfamiliar to a greater or lesser extent with the practices of the scientific community, its specific goals, way of seeing the world and how it supports the assertions of knowledge.Before this can occur, however, they must be engaged in a personal process of construction and attribution of meanings.Thus, learning science involves both personal and social processes. In the social context, it consists of being introduced to the concepts, symbols and conventions of the scientific community (DRIVER, 1999, p. 36).
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In Pursuit of Resistance: Pragmatic Recommendations for Doing Science within One’s Means

In Pursuit of Resistance: Pragmatic Recommendations for Doing Science within One’s Means

has corrective mechanisms built-in – it is sensitive to empirical and practical considerations. This method will not succumb in the same degree to the vagaries of individual opinion; the reason for this is science’s aim at external reality. The fundamental hypothesis of science, as Peirce construes it, is that “[t]here are Real things, whose characters are entirely independent of our opinions about them” (5.384). Thus, the beliefs settled by the scientific method are supposed to be determined (at least in part) “by some external permanency – by something upon which our thinking has no effect” (5.384). So, while the scientific method does not necessarily result in permanently fixed belief, that is, belief that would never be subject to doubt, it does include safeguards against the inevitability of doubt’s resurgence. The very nature of the method results in beliefs that are least susceptible to future doubt.
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Parents talking everyday science with young children

Parents talking everyday science with young children

In the course of these four „stay and play‟ sessions parents, children, the Cass team members and Centre staff together explored how „scaffolding‟ –using the concept developed by Vygotsky (1978) – of the children‟s scientific thinking can be achieved through sensitive intervention and „sustained shared thinking,‟ a process first theorised and promoted by Jerome Bruner (Bruner, 1977).The Cass team had reflected beforehand on any scientific terms to be used and explained during the sessions and had prepared specific prompts and questions suited to the youngest children, aged one, two and three, and to the older ones, aged three to five.Cass project team members met together at UEL after each session to discuss the experience and learning from each session and to adjust the planning for the following session where necessary.
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Talking ‘bout poor folks (thinking ‘bout my folks): Perspectives on comparative poverty in working class households

Talking ‘bout poor folks (thinking ‘bout my folks): Perspectives on comparative poverty in working class households

In Status Anxiety, Alain de Botton (2004: 12) stated that ‘those without status remain unseen, they are treated brusquely, their complexities are trampled upon and their identities ignored’. Our argument is that this ignorance of identities and dismissal of complexities may also be applied to some academic and many policy accounts of lower income groups’ experiences of relative poverty. This critique of social science is not new: research programmes on cyclical deprivation in the 1970s and 1980s were regularly criticised for their failure to take account of how individuals felt about themselves and their lives and to investigate how households actually experienced problems of low income (Welshman, 2012: 164-165).
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Talking about men: conversations about masculinities in recent 'gender-bending' science fiction

Talking about men: conversations about masculinities in recent 'gender-bending' science fiction

In contrast, Marge Piercy’s He, She and It reflects the optimism of Donna Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto.” In this Tiptree Award-shortlisted novel, Piercy intertwines the story of Yod, a mid twenty-first-century “cyborg,” with the tale of Joseph, the sixteenth-century golem of Prague, to again emphasise men’s ongoing commitment to creating life free from women’s influence. Where Roszak fails to consider alternative masculinities, Piercy reiterates the hope of both Shelley and Haraway that “made men” will rebel against the gender ideal imposed by their creators. He, She and It further avoids Memoirs’ good woman/bad man dichotomy by acknowledging that women too may seek to create an artificial man in line with their own ideal of masculinity. Finally, Piercy earns the praise that Joan Gordon offers to feminist cyberpunk writers who move away from feminist nostalgia for the organic feminine (“Yin and Yang” 197). He, She and It instead presents the self-constructed female cyborg and a technologically-based feminist science as most capable of meeting the challenges of the twenty-first century.
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Talking Matters

Talking Matters

conversations it was clear that we talk to partners, family members, colleagues (although more frequently it seems ex- colleagues) and peers (as student teachers) about our work. There was a strong sense that these people provided reassurance, perspective and advice, challenged our thinking and sometimes enabled us to change our decision-making regarding our work. It was also interesting to discover how relatively infrequently our current colleagues were identified as the people we talked to about our work. Maybe this was simply because the participants in the discussion thought that was not the answer I wanted, or maybe it tells us that the time, license and structures to talk to our colleagues about our work is in short supply.
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Talking about men: conversations about masculinities in recent 'gender-bending' science fiction

Talking about men: conversations about masculinities in recent 'gender-bending' science fiction

Science fiction is often called the literature/genre of ideas, while SF writers and readers are also seen to function as a highly engaged and conversant community. Within this community, ideas can generate an ongoing conversation between science fiction texts and authors, as well as among readers, convention attendees, academics and, of late, web communities. Often the conversation concerns gender or, more specifically, how science fiction texts represent gender, including masculinities. Yet critical discussion of fictional constructions of masculinities in science fiction has been limited. This thesis addresses this gap through in-depth literary analysis of ten science fiction short stories and novels which participate in an ongoing conversation about ideas of masculinity. The selected texts have either won or been shortlisted for the James Tiptree, Jr. Award. One primary reason for choosing these texts is that, since 1991, the Tiptree Award has been presented annually to a science fiction or fantasy short story or novel that, “expands or explores our understanding of gender” (Tiptree). This thesis applies both feminist and masculinities theory to the chosen texts, as well as some postcolonial and queer perspectives, to show that although science fiction has been at the cutting edge of fictional explorations of gender as concerning women, it currently lags behind contemporary theorists in its exploration of masculinities.
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Mathematics, chemistry and science connection as a basis of scientific thinking

Mathematics, chemistry and science connection as a basis of scientific thinking

5 ]^#Z)RM''!%R1_2“Nowadays, since the importance scientific activities and knowledge are increasing, enhancing students’ scientific process skills and epistemological beliefs are more important than before. In this view, science curriculums have been revised to enhance students’ scientific process skills, views about nature of science and scientific knowledge in several countries.” # `%' j'k) 1q25 “Recently, the graphical communication has been essential part of all information surrounding us every day. It is necessary to consider whether the graphical information and visualisation (not only in science) is really providing simplification for understanding of messages. Not all of the people are able to comprehend the meaning of visual information without former experience. When we consider the chronology of learning through images, the older experience with graphical information is always stronger than the new one. This is the reason why even the first visualisations of the phenomenon must be factually correct.”
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Assessing and Teaching Critical Thinking in Communication Science and Disorders

Assessing and Teaching Critical Thinking in Communication Science and Disorders

Given the ongoing nature of the pedagogical task, the repeated opportunity to engage critical thinking skills requires more than a one-semester critical thinking course. Once students learn foundational critical thinking skills and knowledge, they need sufficient repetitions across the curriculum so that they develop the propensity to use the abilities when they process information and make decisions in daily life (Green, 2015). This progression of student thinking will require a coordinated effort among CSD faculty members to ensure that students receive ample practice for the development of critical thinking skills and dispositions. Green (2015) stated that critical thinking works against energy efficient thought operations. Thus, students need to achieve mastering of thinking skills so that they perceive the purpose of advanced development of these skills. This disposition will help students recognize that better critical thinking skills are tools for better life decisions and problem solving. In addition, CSD students need to recognize that these same skills will help them make better clinical decisions (Apel, 2011; Finn, 2011; Kamhi, 2011). When students recognize the connections between their critical thinking skills and client improvement, it seems logical that they would have more internal motivation to develop the aptitude and disposition for critical thinking
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D Theory: Talking about Talking about Trees

D Theory: Talking about Talking about Trees

NP, so there is no conflict here, Each dominates a different noun, but several constituents of the same type can be dominated by the same node if they are in a coordinate structure given[r]

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Alternative Careers for Graduates of Library Science Programs: Are Library Schools Doing Enough?

Alternative Careers for Graduates of Library Science Programs: Are Library Schools Doing Enough?

Given the results of their data analysis, Genoni et al. concluded that "respondents continue to report that both their qualification and their skills are relevant to their current employment" (p. 257). The researchers do not breakdown their data sets according to the type of work selected—librarianship, records management, archives, computing and information science, other information work, non-information work (p. 249)—so it is impossible to determine the attitudes of the individuals who classified their work as "other" or "non-information." Despite this limitation, the very inclusion of these categories on the survey suggests that LS researchers recognize the trend toward alternative careers for graduates.
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Talking Points

Talking Points

The aim of the Talking-Points system is to enhance the users' experience while walking around. To tell them interesting things about their location or recommend other interesting locations. It is not a wayfinding system or similar used to find particular locations. Thus, precision would be a much more important factor in evaluating the system's recommendations than recall. Recommendations don't have to be complete, but they have to be good and interesting. There is not necessarily a penalty for missing any particular good recommendation, as long as all the other recommendations given are not uninteresting. Because of that it might be useful to change the algorithm to give priority to recommendations that are based on richer data (e.g. the user liked many items with that tag instead of just one). This would increase the probability of recommendations being good, but it also might affect the diversity and serendipity of the recommendations.
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