Immersive Virtual Learning Environment

Top PDF Immersive Virtual Learning Environment:

The Role of Immersive Virtual Reality in Individual Learning

The Role of Immersive Virtual Reality in Individual Learning

Virtual reality has gained popularity through Oculus Rift (development kit) which came to the market in 2016. Nowadays, there are a couple of virtual reality head-mounted displays (HMD), such as HTC Vive or Playstation VR. A characteristic of such glasses, i.e. immersion, arises from the head-mounted display and a restriction of what a user can see [3]. Immersion is an individual’s total engagement to a particular interaction or task while all other attentional demands are ignored [1]. Within an immersive VR, a user is completely surrounded by an enclosing virtual space [24] whereby this user is beamed to the virtual environment in which they can interact or perform certain tasks with their entire body. In comparison to non-immersive VR, immersive VR offers the opportunity of creating a learning environment, in which a learner is not distracted or disturbed from outside attentional demands [23]. Another advantage of the emerging VR-HMDs is the provided controllers to interact within the virtual space. These controllers allow to interact, to create, or to manipulate objects. As a consequence, the use of VR-HMD and provided controllers make it possible to be more active and in a deeper fashion. These characteristics of immersive VR enhance the opportunities of learning by not only focusing on declarative knowledge, i.e. theoretical knowledge, but to impart skills of how to do something [23]. For instance, a study of non-immersive VR has examined effects of high and low VR conditions and its effects on consumer learning [38].
Show more

10 Read more

Haptic Virtual Reality and Immersive Learning for Enhanced Organic Chemistry Instruction

Haptic Virtual Reality and Immersive Learning for Enhanced Organic Chemistry Instruction

Immersiveness, is described as ‘seeming to surround the audience, player…so that they feel completely involved in something’ (Cambridge Dictionary, 2017) or ‘providing, involving, or characterized by deep absorption or immersion in something (such as an activity or a real or artificial environment)’ (Merriam Webster Dictionary, 2017). Immersion describes the experience of ‘presence’ or feelings of ‘being there’ usually associated with games (Sanders & Cairns, 2010) and VR (Mestre & Vercher, 2011; Tuveri, Macis, Sorrentino, Spano, & Scateni, 2016). It implies a heightened sense of enjoyment (Sanders & Cairns, 2010), that promotes engagement and the ‘flow’ experience (Nakamura & Csikszentmihalyi, 2009; Whitson & Consoli, 2009). Within VR environments, the user is completely removed from all other forms of visual engagement, and the focus on the virtual environment is almost total. The main theme of immersion is reality or its simulation of it, in manners that gets the user completely involved or absorbed. The significance for learning, in terms of learner engagement cannot be overemphasized. Immersion is therefore a major aim of instructional design and facilitation and should also be a key focus in pedagogy or educational technology selection. Though VR systems are increasingly available across various fields, the systems mostly focus on games and entertainment rather than as subject-focused educational technologies. The time is therefore ripe for more developmental efforts to focus on haptic VR systems that are dedicated to the teaching of various subjects.
Show more

17 Read more

USING IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL REALITY FOR ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION TRAINING

USING IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL REALITY FOR ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION TRAINING

Adopting a VR environment for education and training can be very attractive for several reasons. First, as it does not involve security risks that may exist in the real world, users can freely explore the environment without harming themselves, their colleagues or even damaging the environment. Second, users can try to perform tasks and solve the proposed problems how many times they require, without the pressure of a classroom full of colleagues (Patel et al, 2006) or even a formal evaluation. Thus, this kind of environment encourages the user to conduct his/her learning at his/her own pace, with no risks (Mikropoulos et al, 1997). Given these characteristics, VR environments have been developed for different trainings (Grabowski and Jankowski, 2015; Sacks et al, 2013; Ausburn and Ausburn, 2004).
Show more

5 Read more

TEACHING RN-BSN STUDENTS COMMUNITY HEALTH USING AN IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT

TEACHING RN-BSN STUDENTS COMMUNITY HEALTH USING AN IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT

Virtual environments can be used in a variety of programs outside of nursing and can be a valuable immersive learning experience  for students in many different practice disciplines with [r]

12 Read more

Community building and virtual teamwork in an online learning environment

Community building and virtual teamwork in an online learning environment

In the world of OTIS, an online Internet School for occupational therapists, students from four European countries were encouraged to work collaboratively through problem based learning by interacting with each other in a virtual semi-immersive environment. This paper aims to explore the issues that (1) there was little interaction between students from different tutorial groups and (2) virtual teamwork developed in each of the cross cultural tutorial groups. Synchronous data from European students was captured during tutorial sessions and peer booked meetings and evidence suggests that communities of interest were established. It is possible to conclude that collaborative systems can be designed, which encourage students to build trust and teamwork in a cross cultural online learning environment.
Show more

26 Read more

Learning and Long-Term Retention of a Complex Sensorimotor Task Within an Immersive Virtual Reality Environment in a Non-Injured Population

Learning and Long-Term Retention of a Complex Sensorimotor Task Within an Immersive Virtual Reality Environment in a Non-Injured Population

The task on the CAREN involved a virtual boat navigation course in which subjects stood on the motion platform facing forward and navigated through a slalom course of 50 buoys. An upper body harness was worn for safety, and was adjusted so that the subject could move reely, but not fall off the platform. Subjects were instructed to use body movement to control the direction and speed of the virtual boat by shifting their body forward, backward, and side-to- side. Reflective markers were placed on the subjects’ shoulders and captured, using an optical motion capture system (Motion Analysis Corporation, Santa Rosa, CA), for interaction with the IVRE and navigation of the virtual boat through the course (Figure 1). Platform motion mimicked the movement of the boat through the course and over the waves. Subjects participated in the training twice a week for 6 weeks, for a total of 12 visits. The initial training session occurred at visit 1, and the final training session occurred at visit 12. Follow-up tests were also conducted up to 1 year later at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following the 12th training visit, for a total of 16 testing sessions.
Show more

9 Read more

The Design of Immersive English Learning Environment Using Augmented Reality

The Design of Immersive English Learning Environment Using Augmented Reality

In 1949, ENIAC – the first digital computer was born. In 1978, the first personal computer came to earth. Hence, at the beginning stage, digital learning has been defined as “any instructional practice that effectively uses technology to strengthen a student’s learning experience.” (The Alliance for Excellent Education and Center for Digital Learning and Policy) In 1993, here comes the World Wide Web! Once the Internet became more and more popular and applicable for the general public, most people started to consider digital learning should not only be focused on the use of computers but also on the “Internet.” To be more concise, Digital Learning Now! and Florida’s Virtual School define digital learning as "learning facilitated by technology that gives students some elements of control over time, place, path and/or pace." Therefore, the possibility of learning without the limitation of time and space has become the most prominent characteristic of digital learning [10].
Show more

8 Read more

Towards an Explanatory Design Theory for Context-Dependent Learning in Immersive Virtual Reality

Towards an Explanatory Design Theory for Context-Dependent Learning in Immersive Virtual Reality

Hardware and Software. The entire virtual environment is designed with the game engine Unity and the use of a 360° camera as well as the use of 3D laser scanning for the two rooms in which the learning takes place. The use of the 3D laser scanning makes sure that the participants can walk freely in the room and sit on a chair and at a table that are modeled in accordance with the real ones in both contexts. The chair is tracked with a HTC Vive Tracker to allow participants to sit down without falling. All participants wear a head-mounted display (HTC Vive) for viewing the IVR in the learning phase. In front of the HTC Vive, the Leap Motion technology (similar to Schwind et al. 2017) is mounted for all participants, even though it displays the tracked hands into the virtual scene in real-time only for participants in the high sensory immersion condition. Additionally, we let the participants in all conditions wear three HTC Vive trackers (two on each foot and one on the hip) for full-body tracking with Ikinema Orion which are also only functional for participants in the high immersion condition 1 .
Show more

9 Read more

Spatial Navigation in Immersive Virtual Environments

Spatial Navigation in Immersive Virtual Environments

uation where this may not be valid is where direc- tional information is critical. For orientation tasks the simulation proved to be a less than satisfactory learning environment. However, this might not be true in an immersive world where the act of looking around is performed by a physical turning of the head or often of the whole body. Such physical body movements may help to orient a person in a virtual environment in a manner similar to the real world. After this early paper, the remaining authors con- duct their research in truly virtual environments. The first of these is (Witmer, Bailey et al. 1996), who examine how route knowledge gained in a sim- ulation of a complex office building can be seen to aid navigation in the real building. They compare the performance of three groups; one group learns the route in the real building, the second in a virtual simulation of the building and finally one group learns the route solely from colour photographs. The subjects’ spatial knowledge acquisition was measured initially by performing distance and orien- tation estimates. Their wayfinding ability (and hence route knowledge) was measured by recording the total time and distance travelled (using a pedometer) by each person and calculating their number of wrong turns (incorrect choices at an intersection, entering of wrong rooms and back- tracking). The traversal time was almost equal for both the real and virtually trained groups, with the virtual group making slightly more wrong turns than the real group. Witmer et al. also estimate that configurational knowledge was unaffected by the method of training, and go on to conclude that “These results suggest that VEs that adequately rep- resent real world complexity can be effective train- ing media for learning complex routes in buildings.”
Show more

250 Read more

LIVE : the human role in learning in immersive virtual environments

LIVE : the human role in learning in immersive virtual environments

With no prior examples of lessons delivered in immersive VR, the design of ours was informed by the theory of “Experiential Learning” [22] and addresses the three learning stages introduced by Fowler: conceptualisation, construction, and dialogue [15]. Each scenario presents a set of key concepts and interaction techniques. The techniques are then demonstrated either by the instructor who directly interacts with the environment (Two-User version), or by means of an in-world animation that replicates the actions the instructor would have taken (Single-User version). The demonstra- tion discusses and highlights the algorithmic underpinning of the interaction technique. Students can then construe meaning via ex- perimentation through interactive prompts where they can apply the interaction technique to solve various tasks, which we refer to as “interaction prompts”. Subsequently students are encouraged to reflect on what they have seen and experimented with, before moving to the next scenario. Participants advance by satisfying the minimum requirements and then either communicating their intent to the instructor or by pressing an advance button (Single-User).
Show more

11 Read more

Towards a Model of User Experience in Immersive Virtual Environments

Towards a Model of User Experience in Immersive Virtual Environments

Copyright © 2018 Katy Tcha-Tokey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. There are increasing new advances in virtual reality technologies as well as a rise in learning virtual environments for which several studies highlighted the pedagogical value, knowledge transfer, and learners’ engaged-behaviors. Moreover, the notion of user experience is now abundant in the scientific literature without the fact that there are specific models for immersive environments. This paper aims at proposing and validating a model of User eXperience in Immersive Virtual Environment, including virtual learning environments. The model is composed of 10 components extracted from existing models (i.e., presence, engagement, immersion, flow, usability, skill, emotion, experience consequence, judgement, and technology adoption). It was validated in a user study involving 152 participants who were asked to use the edutainment application Think and Shoot and to complete an immersive virtual environment questionnaire. The findings lead us to a modified user experience model questioning new paths between user experience components (e.g., the influence of experience consequence on flow).
Show more

12 Read more

Virtual worlds: a new environment for constructionist learning

Virtual worlds: a new environment for constructionist learning

atego Pu li (4.2.3) . This was you in the same space online. And that distinction of online disappeared. There is somebody here. They are walking up, they are walking in, they are flying, you see them flying over and you know who they are because something has popped up where you just know who they are. So, it did feel rude not to engage in some form of conversation. (2b1 interview). Although all participants had taken part in short activities in Second Life earlier in the course, some described their interaction with SLurtles as resulting in their first experience of immersion in which te h olog e a e i isi le : the Second Life Saturday and the avatar and sitting on benches and the lecture and the voice that was my first immersive experience of the whole thing. And the oddness of it was very distracting. And what was interesting about the SLurtles and engaging with your own scripting control of something was, you're suddenly focused on something inside the environment, where the environment now becomes, goes into your peripheral sort of consciousness. … , that was the moment, where the experience of acting in an avatar's virtual presence I sort of, I got the real deal . (1a2 interview).
Show more

40 Read more

New applications, new global audiences: educators repurposing and reusing 3D virtual and immersive learning resources

New applications, new global audiences: educators repurposing and reusing 3D virtual and immersive learning resources

Much research has been undertaken in 3D immersive environments and here we provide just some examples of what members of the VWWG have used them for. One research study relates to the use of virtual environments by young people who have Autism Spectrum Disorder, particularly in terms of developing their socialisation skills. The Virtual Lab is premised on developing both social skills and personal interests in technology, so the platforms used vary considerably. The most common 3D immersive environment used is Minecraft, especially by the younger groups, with older groups using Unity 3D, Unreal or other 3D game engines, as well as specialist game creation tools such as Sploder, Game Maker and RPG maker. Lab mentors (who are programmers and designers) help participants create their own games and develop both social and coding skills. 3D virtual worlds are used as learning tools for improving socialisation and IT skills rather than for their own sake as teaching environments. Some of the software being used, such as iSee, does not provide sharable objects with the exception of maps, which can be shared. This is the concept of combining entrenched technology (e.g. webcam conferencing) with more recent technology (e.g. 3D virtual environments). This allows users to obtain a greater sensory experience by feeling more engaged with other participants (Safaei et al., 2014). Research in the area of intercultural competence and study abroad suggests that students benefit more if they have prior experiential learning to raise awareness of their world-views and identities. Second Life is proving to be a very useful tool for this as it challenges assumptions and stereotypes, highlighting ways of communicating and developing resilience, critical reflection and deep learning. Research is the backbone of the NMC report (Johnson et al., 2015) and the VWWG community continue researching to ensure that they have the evidence to support their findings.
Show more

13 Read more

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF VIRTUAL AND TRADITIONAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT IN PAKISTAN

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF VIRTUAL AND TRADITIONAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT IN PAKISTAN

The data collected through administration of survey from organizations in the educational sectors of Pakistan. Stratified sampling method used for conduct of survey. Two strata were made. Each strata consist of two universities. In strata one the universities having Virtual learning system (AIOU and VU) were included while in second strata the universities having Traditional learning system (IIUI and MUST) were included. Two hundred questionnaires distributed in these universities. An Online questionnaire was also launched on website www.itzmeaamir.com/vle/index.php and got filled by the students‟ of AIOU whereas from other universities the researchers personally collected filled questionnaires. Students had fully freedom to reply as per their desire. There was no any pressure on them. The questionnaire consist of three sections: (a) Learning Environment (VLE and TLE); (b) Satisfaction of students; and (c) Performance of the students. The questionnaires were filled by the students during their class sessions. As already mentioned, sample size consist of 200 respondents. These two hundred respondents were selected on simple random based and a sample of 100 each was taken from both stratas. The students, specially those who were enrolled in BBA, MBA, BS(CS) programmes were taken into account. Analytical tools such as mean, median mode, standard deviation and chi- square were applied to test the hypotheses using statistical software SPSS version 16.0
Show more

11 Read more

Learning online, supporting online: developing tutorials for the virtual learning environment

Learning online, supporting online: developing tutorials for the virtual learning environment

Although IT skills and confidence levels have increased for the majority in recent years, there are still a number of university members who would be uncomfortable accessing support if it were provided online, and others whose limited IT access off campus would prevent them accessing electronic support away from university. The benefits of providing support online outweigh these potential pitfalls. As Blackboard is the virtual learning environment and the university, supported by strategic documents such as its Learning Technologies Implementation Plan 2005- 08, encourages online learning activities, the most appropriate medium for Blackboard support would seem to be online (Bains & Jones 2003, 242).
Show more

13 Read more

Successful learning or failing premise? A situated evaluation of a virtual learning environment

Successful learning or failing premise? A situated evaluation of a virtual learning environment

It was anticipated the scope of the evaluation would became problematic in the context of a scientific response to a hypothesis, and this resulted in sourcing a methodology which would take into account variables which would account for the socially situated context of Virtual Learning Environments. I found an acceptable methodology in the guidelines offered by Gunn (1997). This qualitative approach was more suitable for my purposes, as the basis of the research, a case study, contained variables which would be difficult to replicate elsewhere. It also became problematical to clearly relate the contribution of a VLE to improvements in retention and achievement, because of the small scale nature of the case study. Nevertheless this aspect is important, and worth pursuing, with a view establishing a basis for further research. I was grateful for the important contribution that the research undertaken by Penny Noel on behalf of the Post Compulsory Education and Training Consortium (CPCET) provided to my research, (Noel 2004) and I will refer to her work in my discussions on retention and achievement.
Show more

15 Read more

Cognitive Presence and Effect of Immersion in Virtual Learning Environment

Cognitive Presence and Effect of Immersion in Virtual Learning Environment

One of the reasons why people strain after gaining a different experience is usually described as follows: they seek to feel, experience something new that is different from their everyday activities and routine. Learners get a chance to experiment with their own identity, to play a different role [1]. People need advancement and diversification of their life through immersion in various meaningful activities and through gaining various experiences that stimulate (positive) emotions. Educators are aware of the fact that emotions have the power to open or close access to effective learning, memory, and the ability to make connections [2]. Besides, according to social constructivist approach, theoretical foundation of which were laid by such thinkers as Dewey, Vygotsky, Piaget, and Bruner, understanding or constructing a meaning is an active and continuous process based on learner’s previous experience, which depends on learners taking responsibility to learn, and fits eLearning as ‘learning among learners’ [3], or collaborative learning. Recently, an updated theory of e-social constructivism has been proposed [4], taking into account the milieu of e-communications in general and eLearning in particular.
Show more

6 Read more

A Framework for Immersive Virtual Environments (FIVE): Speculations on the Role of Presence in Virtual Environments

A Framework for Immersive Virtual Environments (FIVE): Speculations on the Role of Presence in Virtual Environments

We take issue, however, with Ellis’ remarks concerning the possible dis-utility of presence in task performance, since there is an association of the notion of “presence” with “realism”. Two examples are given where it is clear that a realistic visual representation of information (air traffic display, and orbital trajectories in the vicinity of a space station) could lead to deficiency in task performance compared to a distorted representation. However, first, both environments are external, seen through a “window”. Our notion of presence is that it is related to the environment in which the (virtual) body of the participant is acting. It is the relation to the interior of the aircraft cockpit that is relevant for presence, not the environment that can be seen through the window of the cockpit. Secondly, presence does not imply realism. Here is where the conceptual distinction between immersion and presence is useful. The question to ask is: what display characteristics (relevant to a certain application domain) maximise presence? It may be the case that a non-realistic display enhances presence, or that the characteristics that enhance presence are not the same as those that enhance a particular type of task performance. The separation between immersion and presence allows both to be investigated, and even if it turns out that they are correlated in a particular application, this may not be due to causal connection.
Show more

20 Read more

Building a Virtual Constructivist Learning Environment for Learning Computing Security and Forensics

Building a Virtual Constructivist Learning Environment for Learning Computing Security and Forensics

preinstalled. We have also configured and developed scripts for real-world scenarios and experiment execution. 2) A lab module instruction document which allows students to complete the lab based on the instruction. Our learning platform can be easily configured on a single machine or a networked environment as shown in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows a virtual environment within BLOSSOM that has been created on a lab machine and Figure 3 shows an example of the steps carried out when conducting the network forensics lab.

13 Read more

The Effect of Retroactive Interference on Anatomical Learning
using a Virtual Learning Environment

The Effect of Retroactive Interference on Anatomical Learning using a Virtual Learning Environment

The present study attempts to determine whether retroactive interference effects could occur in virtual anatomical learning. Contrary to anatomical atlases in which students can determine their own pace and order in which they learn different anatomical parts, computerized learning environments may lack this kind of individual adaptations. It is therefore important to study if and when RI effects occur in VR learning environments too, in order to optimize the use of virtual learning environments. The possible influence of visuospatial ability was also taken into account when studying RI effects. Visuospatial ability is important for medical students who are learning anatomy (Garg, Norman & Sperotable, 2001). It is also related to competency and quality of results in complex surgery (Wanzel et al., 2002). If there would be an effect of visuospatial ability, adjustments can be made to the study program to make it suitable for the needs and capacities of the individual user. Taken together, the goal of this study is to provide recommendations for development of virtual learning environments for teaching human anatomy.
Show more

26 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...