Immunology and Genetics

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THE ROLE OF THE CLINICAL AND MOLECULAR ASSAYS IN PROSTATE CANCER DETECTION

THE ROLE OF THE CLINICAL AND MOLECULAR ASSAYS IN PROSTATE CANCER DETECTION

Vol 10, Issue 6, 2017 Online 2455 3891 Print 0974 2441 The role of The ClINICAl AND MoleCUlAr ASSAYS IN ProSTATe CANCer DeTeCTIoN fATeMeh MANSoUrI1,2* 1Department of Medical Immunology and Genetics, f[.]

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PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCE BRINGS GENETICS AND IMMUNOLOGY TOGETHER TO EVOLVE A NEW DIMENSION IN TREATING CHILDHOOD CANCER: A REVIEW

PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCE BRINGS GENETICS AND IMMUNOLOGY TOGETHER TO EVOLVE A NEW DIMENSION IN TREATING CHILDHOOD CANCER: A REVIEW

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute lymphocytic leukemia or acute lymphoid leukemia ALL is an acute category of leukemia which is commonly known as the cancer of the white blood cells.[r]

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On the role of cell-mediated cytoxicity in a mouse model of flavivirus encephalitis

On the role of cell-mediated cytoxicity in a mouse model of flavivirus encephalitis

THE JOHN CURTIN SCHOOL OF MEDICAL RESEARCH Division of Immunology and Genetics On the Role of Cell Mediated Cytotoxicity in a Mouse Model of Flavivirus Encephalitis Rosa Maria Licön Luna A thesis subm[.]

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Facing a Shift in Paradigm at the Bedside?

Facing a Shift in Paradigm at the Bedside?

Our entire medical framework is based on the concept of disease, understood as a qualitative departure from normality (health) with a structural substrate (lesion), and usually an identifiable cause (aetiology). This paradigm is loaded with problems, some of which are discussed in the text. Nevertheless, we study, diagnose and treat diseases, and while often painfully conscious of the dysfunctionalities of this scheme, we can hardly imagine how we could practice medicine otherwise. However, most of the recent developments in basic sciences, and most notably in Immunology, Genetics and -omics, are inconsistent with this “health/disease” paradigm. The emerging scenario is that of complex networks, more in the spirit of Systems Biology. In these settings the qualitative difference between health and disease loses its mean- ing, and the whole discourse becomes progressively irreducible to our conventional clinical categories. As clinical re- search stagnates while basic sciences thrive, this gap is widening, and a change in the prevailing paradigm seems un- avoidable. However, all our clinical judgments (including Bayesian reasoning and Evidence Based Medicine) are rooted in the disease/health dichotomy, and one can hardly conceive how they could work without it. The shift in paradigm will not be easy, and certain turmoil is to be expected.
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Mathematics in Modern Immunology

Mathematics in Modern Immunology

Mathematics has a long tradition in biology and medicine, going back at least to Gregor Mendel’s work in genetics and Theodor Boveri’s work on the nature of the chromosomes [1]. However, as the various subfields have become more specialized, and understanding of biological systems more detailed, modelling has often been dismissed or ‘regarded with suspicion, partly because much modelling seems an empty intellectual exercise that fails to deliver biological insight’ [2]. In immunology, the situation is not much different [3]. Some com- monly cited reasons for the separation between experimental immunology and mathematical modelling are (i) the pace of discovery of new agents and new phenomena in the immune system, accompanied by new jargon, (ii) the rapid advance of technology, producing ever more data, and (iii) the contrast in aca- demic environments, culture and terminology. In our view, these issues (at least the first two) are in fact reasons why mathematical modelling will become increasingly important in immunology (and other fields of biology) [4]. It is pre- cisely because intuition is insufficient beyond a certain level of complexity that analysis of the immune system must become more quantitative [5– 7].
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oa Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology - The immunology of mind control (part IV)

oa Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology - The immunology of mind control (part IV)

ver the past 50 years, a few burning questions have been at the forefront of biological science. In textbook sketches, the lymphatic system stopped at the head. All along it felt wrong and there was a feeling that blushes were inevitable. We said things such as, ‘Don’t sneeze too hard – you’re losing brain cells!’ – almost taking every last sip from the cup of our predestined human potential. We were taught that nerves could never regenerate and that you should never bump your head. We had just mastered machines and begun to peer over the edge. We became fascinated with numbers. First it was, ‘How many genes does each one of us possess?’ After discovering that it was half that of the rice plant, we panicked a little, but had to find something to do with all those counting machines. So we counted something else and turned our attention to the microbes in our gut. To our horror, we realised that they made identical neurotransmitters to our own and used the same receptors to listen in on the cross-talk as we do. Genetics, epigenetics and artificial intelligence – the pebble was now skimming across the water. Yet did we ever ask, ‘How do immune cells get into and out of the brain?’
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Evidence against a Simple Tethering Model for Enhancement of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase Processivity by Accessory Protein UL42

Evidence against a Simple Tethering Model for Enhancement of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase Processivity by Accessory Protein UL42

Parris* Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 Received 2 November 2001/Accepted 15 J[r]

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Immunology of dental caries: a review

Immunology of dental caries: a review

Molecular genetics approaches now offer one of the most exciting means of delivering a "subunit" vaccine which would be cost effective. The problem with subunit vaccines has been the inability to maintain sufficiently high levels of antigen in the gut to stimulate antibody production in a cost-effective manner. Recently, candidate antigen genes have been introduced into "harmless" enteric bacteria. These bacteria proliferate for some time and exhibit considerable greater staying power in the gut than simple gelatin capsules filled with antigen. This method of immunization is currently under investigation. But think about it, no microbe which can colonize a human should be considered totally"harmless." Also, some of the plasmid vectors used are marked with genes encoding antibiotic resistance 15 .
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Next-generation sequencing identifies contribution of both class I and II HLA genes on susceptibility of multiple sclerosis in Japanese

Next-generation sequencing identifies contribution of both class I and II HLA genes on susceptibility of multiple sclerosis in Japanese

Department of Statistical Genetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871, Japan.. 9 Laboratory of Statistical Immunology, Immunology Frontier Resea[r]

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Characterization of the antigenic structure of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein C through DNA sequence analysis of monoclonal antibody-resistant mutants.

Characterization of the antigenic structure of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein C through DNA sequence analysis of monoclonal antibody-resistant mutants.

GLORIOSO2,3t* Department of Human Genetics,' Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine,2 and Department of Microbiology and Immunology,3 The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, M[r]

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Antigenic variation (mar mutations) in herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B can induce temperature-dependent alterations in gB processing and virus production.

Antigenic variation (mar mutations) in herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B can induce temperature-dependent alterations in gB processing and virus production.

GLORIOSO2* The Graduate Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology,' Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine,2 and Department of Human Genetics,3[r]

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Palindromy and the location of deletion endpoints in Escherichia coli.

Palindromy and the location of deletion endpoints in Escherichia coli.

Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and of Genetics, Washington University Medical School, St. There is an additional direct repeat composed of 4 bp within the inse[r]

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Positionally independent and exchangeable late budding functions of the Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins.

Positionally independent and exchangeable late budding functions of the Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins.

WILLS1* Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033,1 and Department of Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry,[r]

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Targeted Transduction via CD4 by a Lentiviral Vector Uses a Clathrin-Mediated Entry Pathway

Targeted Transduction via CD4 by a Lentiviral Vector Uses a Clathrin-Mediated Entry Pathway

Chen1,2,3* Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, California1; University of California—Los Angeles AIDS Institute, David G[r]

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An introduction to immunology and immunopathology

An introduction to immunology and immunopathology

Over the past decade, there have been numerous advances in our current understanding of the immune system and how it functions to protect the body from infection. Given the complex nature of this subject, it is beyond the scope of this article to provide an in-depth review of all aspects of immunology. Rather, the purpose of this article is to provide medical students, medical residents, primary-care practitioners and other health- care professionals with a basic introduction to the main components and function of the immune system and its role in both health and disease. This article will also serve as a backgrounder to the immunopathological dis- orders discussed in the remainder of this supplement. The topics covered in this introductory article include: innate and acquired immunity, passive and active immu- nization and immunopathologies, such as hypersensitiv- ity reactions, autoimmunity and immunodeficiency.
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CLINICAL AND VACCINE IMMUNOLOGY

CLINICAL AND VACCINE IMMUNOLOGY

The References section must include all jour- nal articles (both print and online), books and book chapters (both print and online), patents, theses and dissertations, published conferen[r]

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STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

STUDIES OF THE IMMUNOLOGY OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

The complement activity of 9 of 11 sera from premature infants fell within the range found in normal adult sera. Experiments[r]

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CLINICAL AND VACCINE IMMUNOLOGY

CLINICAL AND VACCINE IMMUNOLOGY

The References section must include all jour- nal articles (both print and online), books and book chapters (both print and online), patents, theses and dissertations, published conferen[r]

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CLINICAL AND VACCINE IMMUNOLOGY

CLINICAL AND VACCINE IMMUNOLOGY

The References section must include all jour- nal articles (both print and online), books and book chapters (both print and online), patents, theses and dissertations, published conferen[r]

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Immunology and Disease of the Kidney

Immunology and Disease of the Kidney

It is now evident that a molecular moiety of several members of the penicillin family may act as a hapten, combine with an endogenous protein to make a complete antigen, stim[r]

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