Mind and Cognitive Science

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Transcranial Theory of Mind: A New Revolution of Cognitive Science

Transcranial Theory of Mind: A New Revolution of Cognitive Science

In recent years, many philosophers and cognitive scientists have begun to believe that a new theoretic revolution is occurring in cognitive science. The revolution is the rise of theoretical models of “4E+S” cognition. “4E+S” refers to embodied mind, embedded mind, enacted mind, extended mind, and situated mind. Embodied mind is the idea that not only the brain is responsible for cognition but that our body also has an important role in the formation of cognition. That is, some bodily processes outside the brain may participate in cognitive processes. As Rowlands says in his new book, New Science of Mind, embodied mind means “mental processes…are partly constituted by, partly made up of, wider (i.e., extraneural) bodily structures and processes” [1]. Embedded mind refers to the idea that a cognitive subject is embedded in the environment and cannot be separated from it. It is believed that some environmental processes outside of the body may be constitutive parameters for completing cognitive tasks. Rowlands generalized this idea as follows: “mental
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The cognitive biases of human mind in accepting and transmitting religious and theological beliefs: An analysis based on the cognitive science of religion

The cognitive biases of human mind in accepting and transmitting religious and theological beliefs: An analysis based on the cognitive science of religion

showed that 4-year-old children understand that mental states can be distinct from the physical world. Children understand that intentional agents can hold false beliefs that are different from things in the world (Barrett et al. 2013:1471–2954). In addition, many studies of human beliefs in afterlife have shown that people in different cultures continue to attribute mental states to a person even after his or her physical death. In one of the most famous of these studies, Bering et al. (2005) showed that 5-year-olds, even those who grew up in secular families, have a strong tendency to believe that a dead mouse baby (eaten by a crocodile) can continue to feel the nostalgia and the loss of her mother. Cognitive science of religion researchers conclude from the evidence that the belief that ‘mental states are distinct from the physical body and can survive after the physical death’ has become a ‘natural’ and ‘cognitive bias’ for the human mind. This bias plays an important role in the widespread acceptance of the belief in spirits and the afterlife, and is the natural cause of the widespread transmission of these beliefs in many human cultures.
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Review of The embodied mind : cognitive science and human experience by Varela, Francisco J , Thompson, Evan and Rosch, Eleanor

Review of The embodied mind : cognitive science and human experience by Varela, Francisco J , Thompson, Evan and Rosch, Eleanor

The book proceeds in five parts. Part I explores the two elements of the targeted circular interaction – cognitive science and human experience. Here the authors ally their project with that of Merleau- Ponty, though they contrast the phenomenological school’s method of reflection upon experience with their preferred meditative method of open-ended mindful investigation. Part II argues that although cognitivism has uncovered that there is no unified self, it fails to reconcile this conclusion with our lived experience. They propose that the Buddhist tradition offers a deeper appreciation of the absence of the self through which we can learn to experience ourselves in an ego-less manner. Part III explores the question of how the mind should be understood if not in terms of a unified substantial self. The authors draw both on contemporary ideas in biology and cognitive science regarding self-organisation, emergent properties and connectionist architecture, and on related Buddhist ideas regarding karma and the Wheel of Life. Part IV further develops this new ‘enactive’ approach to cognitive science and clarifies their two key conceptual innovations: embodiment and enaction. They explain that the concept of embodiment is intended to highlight:
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[M506.Ebook] PDF Ebook Mind Introduction To Cognitive Science Author Paul Thagard Published On April 2005 By Paul Thagard.pdf

[M506.Ebook] PDF Ebook Mind Introduction To Cognitive Science Author Paul Thagard Published On April 2005 By Paul Thagard.pdf

Science)] [Author: Paul Thagard] Published On (April, 2005) By Paul Thagard By purchasing the affordable rate as well as get completed downloading and install, you have actually completed to the first stage to get this [(Mind: Introduction To Cognitive Science)] [Author: Paul Thagard] Published On (April, 2005) By Paul Thagard It will certainly be absolutely nothing when having purchased this publication as well as do nothing. Review it and also disclose it! Invest your couple of time to simply read some sheets of web page of this publication [(Mind: Introduction To Cognitive Science)] [Author: Paul Thagard] Published On (April, 2005) By Paul Thagard to read. It is soft file and easy to read any place you are. Appreciate your new behavior.
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Book Review: Vygotsky and Cognitive Science: Language and the Unification of the Social and Computational Mind

Book Review: Vygotsky and Cognitive Science: Language and the Unification of the Social and Computational Mind

Vygotsky and Cognitive Science: Language and the Unification of the Social and Computational Mind.. William Frawley University of Delaware.[r]

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Language, Mind, and Cognitive Science: Remarks on Theories of the Language-Cognition Relationships in Human Minds

Language, Mind, and Cognitive Science: Remarks on Theories of the Language-Cognition Relationships in Human Minds

Building on this early work, Carruthers (2012) presents a new analysis of the literature where he argues more clearly for a point mentioned in his book with Botterill. He suggests that the views vary from one extreme to another where, on the one hand, language is seen as having no role in cognition and, on the other hand, it is seen as wholly determining cognition. The position according to which thought is completely independent from language might not be defended by anyone—if only because we interact with other people using language and this can influence one’s thoughts. The other extreme, that thought is “conceptually dependent upon language” (Carruthers, 2012, p. 383) is not discussed here, or by Carruthers, mostly because—in both cases—we believe it to be discredited from the point of view of cognitive science (but see Andrews (2002) for a critique of Davidson from this point of view 10 ). The other positions, including the ones discussed above, are thus different positions to be placed between these two extreme positions. Although I agree, as I discuss in 2.3.1, that the perspective offered by Whorf and the perspective offered by Vygotsky are different in terms of degrees, I believe that the two other positions are of a different kind. I will say more on this topic in 2.3.2 and in 2.3.3. My account will differ from Carruthers’ (2012) in two ways: first, I keep Dennett’s view as one of the interesting options while he dismisses it (cf. discussion in 2.2.4); second, I think the idea of an axis with these two extremes applies well to compare Whorf’s and Vygotsky’s views, but I do not think it works well to situate Carruthers’ own view and Dennett’s.
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Review Essay: Species of Mind - The Philosophy and Biology of Cognitive Ethology

Review Essay: Species of Mind - The Philosophy and Biology of Cognitive Ethology

and the authors’ presentation of a clear and cogent case for cognitive ethology against this chaotic background is in general one of the real achievements of this book. As they point out, at its beginning ethology was already ‘cognitive’ with the work of Darwin and his follower George Romanes. As such, however, it was limited to a somewhat anecdotal and uncritical ascription of mentality to animals, and came to be regarded as unscientific with the onset of behaviourism in this century. With the later decline of behaviourism, the issue of animal mentality returned to the scene most forcefully, perhaps, with the work of Donald Griffin. But while sympathetic to the broad goals of Griffin’s work, Allen and Bekoff agree with his critics who argue that his attribution to non-human animals of intentionality and consciousness remains uncritical and anecdotal. Allen and Bekoff see their goal as that of using advances in recent philosophy of mind and cognitive science to suggest ways in which mentalistic approaches to animal behaviour might be tested, and this results in an approach that is admirably open and non-dogmatic. Anyone interested in the issue of animal mindedness will, I'm sure, find the book interesting and enlightening. Moreover, by bringing conceptual and empirical issues together in making their case, the authors fruitfully open up the issues of human consciousness and intentionality to new ways of thinking as well, and so the relevance of the book goes beyond the brief the authors have set for themselves.
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Free Will and Advances in Cognitive Science

Free Will and Advances in Cognitive Science

During recent decades much became known about neural mechanisms of the mind-brain, especially about mechanisms of perception at the lower levels of the mental hierarchy (Gross- berg, 1988). This foundation makes it possible to verify the vagueness of initial states of mental representations. It is known that visual imagination is created by top-down signals. If one closes one’s eyes, and imagines an object, seen just a second ago, this imagination gives an idea of properties of mental rep- resentations of the object. The imagined object is vague com- pared with the object perceived with opened eyes. If we open our eyes, it seems that we immediately perceive the object crisply and consciously. However, it is known that it takes ap- proximately 160 ms to perceive the object crisply and con- sciously; therefore the neural mechanisms acting during these 160 ms are unconscious. This crude experimental verification of dynamic logic predictions was confirmed in detailed neuro- imaging experiments (Bar et al., 2006; Perlovsky, 2009c). Men- tal representations in memory are vague and less conscious with closed eyes; with opened eyes they are not conscious. Opened eyes mask vagueness of initial mental states from our consciousness. Dynamic logic mathematically models a psy- chological theory of Perceptual Symbol System (Barsalou, 1999; Perlovsky & Ilin, 2010b). In this theory symbols in the brain are processes simulating experiences, and they are mathe- matically modeled by dynamic logic processes.
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Frank Schumann. Embodied cognitive science: is it part of cognitive science? Analysis within a philosophy of science background PICS

Frank Schumann. Embodied cognitive science: is it part of cognitive science? Analysis within a philosophy of science background PICS

Such principle reasons to abandon systemic boundaries might be given by considerations  on  circular  causation  emphasised  for  instance  by  Thompson  and  Varela  (2001)  and  Varela,  Thompson  and Rosch  (1991).  In what  Clark  calls  ‘continuous  reciprocal causation’ (1998,  p.  514) Varela et al. present a form of circular causation in which “no discrete temporal staging  interrupts the coupled dynamics of linked systems” (ibid), because the relations between the  systems  are  analogue  and  not  digital.  In  such  systems  we  perhaps  still  can  identify  single  components of the systems,  but  we  can not  explain the individual behaviour of the compo‐ nents  by  isolating  them.  Clark  thinks  that  “given  the  continuous  nature  of  the  mutually  modulatory  influences,  the  usual  analytic  strategy  of  divide  and  conquer  yields  scant  re‐ wards”  (ibid, p. 514). This  means that looking at  individual units can  not even give us their  own  behaviours,  because  they  are  not  the  sufficient  objects  of  study  even  in  terms  of  their  own  behaviour.  Rather,  the  necessary  object  of  study  then  would  be  the  larger  system  the  elements  are  part  of,  even  if  we  are  only  interested  in  the  behaviour  of  individual  compo‐ nents. Clark concludes that if the causal relations between mind, body and world are indeed  continuous  and  reciprocal,  “we may  indeed confront  behavioural unfoldings  that resist  ex‐ planation  in  terms  of  inputs  to  and  output  from  some  supposedly  insulated  cognitive  en‐ gine”  (1998,  p.  515).  That  is  to  say  that  separating  the  individual  system  from  the  global  system would not be possible.  
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Cognitive Science and Psychology

Cognitive Science and Psychology

The protocol algorithm abstracted from a human cognizer's own narrative in the course of doing a cognitive task is an explanation of the corresponding mental activity in Pylyshyn's (1984) virtual machine model of mind. Strong equivalence between an analytic algorithm and the protocol algorithm is an index of validity of the explanatory model. Cognitive psychologists may not find the index strong equivalence useful as a means to ensure that a theory is not circular because (a) research data are also used as foundation data, (b) there is no justification for the relationship between a to-be-validated theory and its criterion of validity, and (c) foundation data, validation criterion and to-be-validated theory are not independent in cognitive science. There is also the difficulty with not knowing what psychological primitives are.
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Social Constructionism as Cognitive Science

Social Constructionism as Cognitive Science

Lurking within the linguistic turn is a potential for relativism, a complete denial of objective reality outside of language, for how can we determine when something is more than a mere cultural idea other than through the use of more linguistic behaviour? Much has been written about the nature of the ontological commitments of social constructionism focusing upon the degrees of realism that are acceptable in psychology (Parker, 1999; Potter, Edwards & Ashmore, 1999; McLennan, 2001; Still, 2001). Some theorists (for example, Gergen, 2001) directly criticize what they see as misguided realism in disciplines that have not taken the linguistic turn, such as cognitive science. In so doing, such theorists seek to undermine the fabric of that discipline. As a cognitive scientist I have read such arguments in a mood of some disquiet, not because I distrust my own particular views on realism, but because I recognize that the emphasis upon human cultural behaviour and its effects upon psychology is a research agenda for my discipline too (see Harré, 2002a). I have therefore been perplexed by the move from recognition of the social construction of cultural artefacts (by which I mean anything from technologies through to concepts) to a deep scepticism about the psychological dispositions that allow this to happen. What is more, as Harré (2002a) makes clear, it is crucial for cognitive science to understand humans as symbol users, for example at the linguistic level, and this means that any knowledge of the machinery that underlies human symbolic behaviour must pay heed to the normative “rules” of symbol use. An integrated science of mind and socially embedded action is required. To this end, I have wanted to outline the common interests of both social constructionism and cognitive science, in abstract theoretical terms, in order to facilitate future research and also to slice through the debates about ontology without simply making a position statement from the realist bench. The key to achieving this, I think, is in realizing that both groups are dealing with information systems and this paper aims to explicate this and its consequences.
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An Approach to Philosophy of Cognitive Science

An Approach to Philosophy of Cognitive Science

From 1956 and through the 1960s, discussion in analytic philosophy of mind concerned competing theses about the metaphysics of mind – Gilbert Ryle’s behaviourism, the materialism of U.T. Place, Jack Smart, and David Armstrong, Hilary Putnam’s machine functionalism, and the rather different version of functionalism developed by David Lewis. 1 The 1960s also saw the publication of books by three of the most major figures in the philosophy of cognitive science. Chomsky’s Aspects of the Theory of Syntax was published in 1965, with its striking claim about cognitive states that are inaccessible to consciousness, states of tacit knowledge of syntactic rules (1965, p. 8): ‘Obviously, every speaker of a language has mastered and internalized a generative grammar that expresses his knowledge of his language. This is not to say that he is aware of the rules of the grammar or even that he can become aware of them.’ In 1968, Jerry Fodor published his first book, Psychological Explanation: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Psychology, along with an important paper, ‘The appeal to tacit knowledge in psychological explanations’. And Daniel Dennett’s Content and Consciousness, with its distinction between personal and subpersonal levels of description, appeared in 1969.
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Introduction of Disaster Cognitive Psychological Science

Introduction of Disaster Cognitive Psychological Science

For several reasons, we add disaster cognitive psychological science as a new research school in disaster sciences. First, traditional disaster sciences did not specifically examine human-behavior-related disasters. They mainly emphasized the study of hazards and the impacts of disasters on societies and environments. Second, both psychology and cognitive science are interdisciplinary scientific studies of the mind and its processes. Therefore, psychology and cognitive science are human-centered approaches and specifically examine human behaviors. Third, psychology and cognitive science are hub sciences. Psychology is one hub science among academic fields [15]. Many sub-research fields are associated with psychology, such as clinical, educational, so- cial, cognitive, and animal psychology. Cognitive science is a key research concept when we study human minds. Cognitive science connects artificial intelligence, linguistics, anthropology, psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, and education [16].
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Bayesian Cognitive Science, Unification, and Explanation

Bayesian Cognitive Science, Unification, and Explanation

An assumption often implicit in this literature is that unification obviously bears on explanation. Griffiths et al. ([2010], p. 360), for example, claim that ‘probabilistic models provide a unifying framework for explaining the inferences that people make in different settings.’ Clark ([2013], p. 201) writes that ‘one way to think about the primary ‘added value’ of these [kinds of Bayesian] models is that they bring perception, action, and attention into a single unifying framework. They thus constitute the perfect explanatory partner… for recent approaches that stress the embodied, environmentally embedded, dimensions of mind and reason’ (emphasis added). Even more explicit is Friston ([2009], [2010]). He suggests that the unification afforded to cognitive science by the Bayesian framework might be driven by a specific hypothesis, which he calls the “free-energy principle,” concerning how different phenomena are brought about by a single type of mechanism. Friston writes: ‘If one looks at the brain as implementing this scheme (minimising a variational bound on disorder), nearly every aspect of its anatomy and physiology starts to make sense’ (Friston [2009], p. 293); ‘a recently proposed free-energy principle for adaptive systems tries to provide a unified account of action, perception and learning... the principle [can] account for many aspects of brain structure and function and lends it the potential to unify different perspectives on how the brain works’ (Friston [2010], p. 127). Along the same lines, Hohwy ([2013], p. 1)
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Heuristics, Concepts, and Cognitive Architecture: Toward Understanding How The Mind Works

Heuristics, Concepts, and Cognitive Architecture: Toward Understanding How The Mind Works

Heuristics are often invoked in the philosophical, psychological, and cognitive science liter- atures to describe or explain methodological techniques or “shortcut” mental operations that help in inference, decision-making, and problem-solving. Yet there has been surprisingly little philosophical work done on the nature of heuristics and heuristic reasoning, and a close inspec- tion of the way(s) in which “heuristic” is used throughout the literature reveals a vagueness and uncertainty with respect to what heuristics are and their role in cognition. This dissertation seeks to remedy this situation by motivating philosophical inquiry into heuristics and heuristic reasoning, and then advancing a theory of how heuristics operate in cognition. I develop a positive working characterization of heuristics that is coherent and robust enough to account for a broad range of phenomena in reasoning and inference, and makes sense of empirical data in a systematic way. I then illustrate the work this characterization does by considering the sorts of problems that many philosophers believe heuristics solve, namely those resulting from the so-called frame problem. Considering the frame problem motivates the need to gain a better understanding of how heuristics work and the cognitive structures over which they oper- ate. I develop a general theory of cognition which I argue underwrites the heuristic operations that concern this dissertation. I argue that heuristics operate over highly organized systems of knowledge, and I o ff er a cognitive architecture to accommodate this view. I then provide an account of the systems of knowledge that heuristics are supposed to operate over, in which I suggest that such systems of knowledge are concepts. The upshot, then, is that heuristics oper- ate over concepts. I argue, however, that heuristics do not operate over conceptual content, but over metainformational relations between activated and primed concepts and their contents. Fi- nally, to show that my thesis is empirically adequate, I consider empirical evidence on heuristic reasoning and argue that my account of heuristics explains the data.
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Cognitive science and epistemic openness

Cognitive science and epistemic openness

passive faculties, the former using concepts to “interpret” what “the world” imposes on the latter. . . . But as soon as we have this picture in mind it occurs to us, as it did to Hegel, that those all important a priori concepts, those which determine what our experience or our morals will be, might have been different. . . . The possibility of different conceptual schemes highlights the fact that a Kantian unsynthesized intuition can exert no influence on how it is to be synthesized—or, at best, can exert an influence we shall have to describe in a way . . . relative to a chosen conceptual scheme. . . . Insofar as a Kantian intuition is effable it is just a perceptual judgment, and thus not merely “intuitive.” Insofar as it is ineffable, it is incapable of having an explanatory function. This dilemma . . . casts doubt on the notion of a faculty of “receptivity.” There seems no need to postulate an intermediary between the physical thrust of the stimulus upon the organ and the full-fledged conscious judgment that the properly programmed organism forms in consequence.” (Rorty 1979 p.3-4)
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Networks in cognitive science

Networks in cognitive science

or  language  competition,  (e.g.  [131])  under  the  same  theoretical  umbrella.  Many   new  questions  arise  concerning  how  far  network  properties  at  the  neural  level   translate   into   network   properties   at   higher   levels   and   vice   versa   (see   Outstanding  Questions).  Network  theory  also  may  help  bridge  the  gap  between   the   brain   and   the   mind,   shedding   new   light   on   how   knowledge   is   stored   and   exploited,   as   well   as   reduce   the   gulf   that   separates   the   study   of   individual   and   collective   behavior.   Moreover,   understanding   the   origin   of   the   observed   properties   of   networks   through   the   tools   of   Network   Science   may   help   unify   research   on   the   development   of   cognition   during   childhood   with   the   study   of   processing   in   the   adult   state   and   its   decay   during   aging   or   illness.   Network   science  is  a  young  discipline  (Box  V),  but  it  promises  to  be  a  valuable  integrative   framework  for  understanding  and  relating  the  analysis  of  mind  and  behavior  at  a   wide   range   of   scales,   from   brain   processes,   to   patterns   of   social   and   cultural   interaction.   Overall,   network   theory   can   help   cognitive   science   become   more   internally  coherent  and  more  interconnected  with  the  many  other  fields  where   network  theory  has  proved  fruitful.    
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Teaching Cognitive Science as Classics

Teaching Cognitive Science as Classics

The cognitive science specialties could be likened to the various branches of physics, or of ge- ography, which are regarded as part of an encompassing physics or geography discipline. Just as physics is the study of the physical universe, and geography is the study of the surface of our planet, so cognitive science is the study of cognition. Just as physics and geography employ a variety of techniques, and evaluate their data from a variety of viewpoints, so does cognitive sci- ence. If cognitive science is multidisciplinary, then so are physics and geography. In that case, just as basic physics and geography are taught in schools as important, if not essential, areas of knowledge, so should a basic cognitive science be taught in schools. Indeed, the importance of understanding the human mind and its working suggests that the study of cognitive science in schools should be regarded as essential rather than merely important.
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PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACH IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE

PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACH IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE

As we discuss that mind is consider both as a monist and as a dualist its depend on us which view point we are taking to understand the mind the different types such as the idealist tells that mind and body both are same entity those thinking are consider s a metaphor that is mind as as a clay or mind is a entity which is control by god. As a dualist it believe that mind and body both are different entity the classis dualist tells that the mind controls the body where the parallelism tells that mind and body are both different entities. While the euiphenalism believe that body control the mind and the interactionism tells that the mind and the body both control each other.
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Putting the Philosophy of Science into Mind: Knowing Minds By Models

Putting the Philosophy of Science into Mind: Knowing Minds By Models

The difficulty in fully stating the laws of the theory may be avoided by noting that either there are no laws in the traditional folk psychological sense, in which case not being able to set them out is no problem, or the laws are merely descriptions of different models. In the latter case, it may not be surprising to find that we cannot fully articulate those principles, but rather we have a sense of familiarity with using the models. Perhaps articulating the appropriate descriptions of our cognitive models is a research agenda of cognitive science, but adopting the model-based view of theories makes it clear that we do not need to possess such descriptions in order to use the models. Similarly, the notion of unconscious models may strike some as less mysterious than unconscious sentences.
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