missing children

Top PDF missing children:

Social selection, social sorting and education – 2: 'missing' children

Social selection, social sorting and education – 2: 'missing' children

happen. When a child changes school, the ‘old’ school is obliged by law to pass his or her records to the ‘new’ school, and schools are provided with school-to-school (S2S) computing software and a common transfer form to assist in this. However, it may be that pupil records are particularly at risk of being lost when children change schools, and it is clearly important that schools’ use of S2S is kept under regular review and that any improvements needed are made. On the other side of the coin, a child must be recorded on the school roll if the school is to receive funding for the child, and that record includes each pupil’s admission date. Newly admitted pupils can be identified by their admission date, and pupils who had a 2005 LPD record but no matching 2004 record can also be identified. If the issue is one of missing records rather than missing children, then the number of childrenmissing’ after 2004 will be balanced by the number of pupils newly arrived on a school’s roll in 2005 and who had no 2004 record. Figure 5 is based on all records in the 2005 LPD, including records for pupils in the shire counties and unitary authorities around London, and shows the total percentage of pupils who were newly admitted to their current school in the 2004/05 school year. For example of 154,400 11 year olds, 97.1 per cent (N=149,853) were newly admitted, and 19.6 per cent (N=13,062) of the 66,754 pupils aged 16 were newly admitted. This is consistent with what might be expected given the structure of maintained mainstream schooling. With few
Show more

92 Read more

Analysis of Geographical Distribution of Missing Children Based on the Missing Children Mobile GIS Mutual Assistance System of China

Analysis of Geographical Distribution of Missing Children Based on the Missing Children Mobile GIS Mutual Assistance System of China

states in the United States and covers 18 countries worldwide. It uses the US emergency alert system to disseminate alarm messages widely through commer- cial radio stations, satellite radio stations, television stations, and electronic mail, electronic street signs, and text messages. At the same time, the Federal Bureau of Investigation of American law enforcement agencies, set up a “National Cen- ter for missing & exploited children” [7], and opened a variety of language all-weather hotline to rescue the abducted children in the shortest possible time. However, most of the existing missing children search systems belong to the “network search” model [8], and they can’t fully mobilize social resources to participate in the search for missing children at home and abroad. Considering the public participation is low and information dissemination speed is slow in the first time that the parents found the child missing, the Missing Children Mobile GIS Mutual Assistance System of China has emerged as the times re- quirement [9].
Show more

18 Read more

Runaway Youth: Caring for the Nation’s Largest Segment of Missing Children

Runaway Youth: Caring for the Nation’s Largest Segment of Missing Children

The largest segment of missing children in the United States includes runaways, children who run away from home, and thrownaways, children who are told to leave or stay away from home by a household adult. Although estimates vary, as many as 1 in 20 youth run away from home annually. These unaccompanied youth have unique health needs, including high rates of trauma, mental illness, substance use, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections. While away, youth who run away are at high risk for additional trauma, victimization, and violence. Runaway and thrownaway youth have high unmet health care needs and limited access to care. Several populations are at particular high risk for runaway episodes, including victims of abuse and neglect; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth; and youth in protective custody. Pediatricians and other health care professionals have a critical role to play in supporting runaway youth, addressing their unique health needs, fostering positive relationships within their families and with other supportive adults, and connecting them with available community resources. This report provides clinical guidance for pediatricians and other health care professionals regarding (1) the identi fi cation of adolescents who are at risk for running away or being thrown away and (2) the management of the unique medical, mental health, and social needs of these youth. In partnership with national, state, and local resources, pediatricians can signi fi cantly reduce risk and improve long-term outcomes for runaway youth.
Show more

14 Read more

Building Helplines and Caring for Missing Children: A Community Project

Building Helplines and Caring for Missing Children: A Community Project

There have been several measures initiated by government of India, being a signatory to the UN Convention for the Rights of the Child, in the areas of education and health. These efforts with regard to basic rights of safety, survival and protection of children have just begun in India. The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) observed that “missing children is a veritable black hole in law enforcement. The police and State/ UT govt. including local administration until now have failed to even acknowledge the problem” (NHRC, 2007 p. 21). Neglect of the problem is reflected in abysmally low budget allocated for child protection. Child budgeting by the MWCD revealed that total expenditure on children (health, education, development and protection) was 3.86 per cent in 2005–2006 and 4.91 per cent in 2006–07 while the share of child protection in the Child Budget remained a mere 0.03 per cent from 2004–05 to 2006–07. Problem of missing children seems to be entirely out of the current agenda of policy and law. It is only recently the definition of ‘missing child’ in India has been written (May 2013) with the Supreme Court of the country coming to the rescue: “a person below eighteen years of age, whose whereabouts are not known to the parents, legal guardians and any other person, who may be legally entrusted with the custody of the child, whatever may be the circumstances/ causes of disappearance. The child will be considered missing and in need of care and protection within the meaning of the later part of the Juvenile Act, until located and/or his/her safety/well being is established”(Bachpan Bachao Andolan, 2013).
Show more

7 Read more

The Pediatrician’s Role in the Prevention of Missing Children

The Pediatrician’s Role in the Prevention of Missing Children

374 000 or 28% of missing children were in this cat- egory. NISMART-1 included a category called “oth- erwise missing” to include those who were missing but did not fit into any of the other categories. There were nearly 440 000 children in this category with one third of the episodes being concerning enough for the parents to have reported them to the police. Children who have wandered off or disappeared in this way are at significant risk even though they have not been abducted or run away. They are vulnerable to abuse and exploitation, may become disoriented, or may be injured unintentionally. One in five suf- fered some type of physical harm, and 1 in 7 was abused or assaulted while missing, which empha- sizes the point that every case in which a child is missing must be taken seriously regardless of the reason or perceived reason the child is gone.
Show more

8 Read more

Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Missing Children in the Coastal Region of Sao Paulo State, Brazil

Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Missing Children in the Coastal Region of Sao Paulo State, Brazil

The material reported in this survey indicates that although it was not possible to establish the real depth of the connection that exists between CSEC and missing children and adolescents, the fact that only 38 (8%) of the names on both sets of registers (police and NGOs) were common is a strong indicator of the deep-seated institutional and organizational problems that exist in Brazilian law enforcement and human service communities. Further, considering that only 28% of the NGO cases of runaways had been registered with the police officially as missing people suggests that the number of missing youth in São Paulo state is many times larger than the number officially reported. Considering the number of cases with police missing reports that were not identified by the professionals working in the NGO (50%) it is possible to infer that this problem is not often perceived as being sufficiently important as to warrant active coordination of the activities of the 2 sectors that impact most directly on the lives of missing and highly vulnerable children. Increased public attention to reporting (and to taking action) is a major challenge confronting both sectors that work so directly with society’s most vulnerable children and youth.
Show more

23 Read more

Caretaker Satisfaction With Law Enforcement Response to Missing Children.

Caretaker Satisfaction With Law Enforcement Response to Missing Children.

were first published in 1994 (Steidel, 2006). Another pos­ sible reason why law enforcement agencies did not dis­ patch officers in response to every report of a potentially missing, abducted, or runaway/thrownaway child may reflect competing priorities for personnel and other resources. If individual agencies do not have enough offi­ cers to handle all incoming reports according to the best practice guidelines, they may be forced to make triage decisions about the children who are most likely to be in immediate danger rather than treating each missing child report as if the child is in immediate danger. It is also possible that well-informed law enforcement personnel and policymakers do not, in spite of official policies, believe that the recommendation for universal dispatch of police in all missing children related reports is warranted or efficacious. If there are indeed such doubts, then research is needed to assess whether a universal dis­ patch policy results in better outcomes than a policy in which dispatch is conditioned on certain risk factors. On the other hand, if there is general consensus about the need for universal dispatch in the law enforcement com­ munity, then more discussion is needed about how to provide the funding and personnel to achieve this goal.
Show more

9 Read more

Missing Children

Missing Children

Although few pediatricians are likely to see runaway children visiting their offices, professional support for health programs for street children can be a valuable com- munity service..[r]

5 Read more

The Business of Missing Children

The Business of Missing Children

at Viet Nam:AAP Sponsored on September 7, 2020. www.aappublications.org/news[r]

5 Read more

China's Missing Children: Political Barriers to Citizenship through the Household Registration System

China's Missing Children: Political Barriers to Citizenship through the Household Registration System

Below the provincial level, officials’ job effectiveness was measured, at least in part, through their ability to maintain fertility rates around prescribed targets. 24 For local officials, meeting fertility targets weighed the same as key economic targets on officials’ Target Responsibility System evaluation, the system by which local leaders are evaluated annually for potential promotion. 25 The tightening of family planning enforcement created significant incentives to hide out-of-plan births through under-reporting or denying formal registration status, not only for families facing financial sanctions, but also officials whose performance evaluation was at least in part defined by reaching fertility goals. 26 Because of this framework of legal personhood based on legitimate and illegitimate births in the eyes of the government, local governments, through their ability to control citizenship rights through the hukou system, denied out-of-plan births access to citizenship, both by requiring family planning certificates for hukou registration and by outright denying hukou registration for out-of-plan children. 27 In the 1991 China Health and Nutrition Survey, 71.9 per cent of rural communities and 66 per cent of urban communities reported required delays in registration of out-of-plan births. 28
Show more

23 Read more

Computers: The Link to Missing Children, 7 Computer L.J. 73 (1986)

Computers: The Link to Missing Children, 7 Computer L.J. 73 (1986)

It is certainly evident the priorities of this great country are in some disorder. A country that can launch a space shuttle that can return to the earth and take [r]

17 Read more

Lost or Missing Children Policy. September 2015

Lost or Missing Children Policy. September 2015

3.6. Particular care will be taken to register all children in each and every club or out-of/after school activity. A register will be taken of each child at every club or out of school activity. As a minimum, any unexplained absences will be reported immediately to the school office and to the Headteacher by the responsible teacher so that swift and immediate action will be taken. In the absence of the Headteacher from the premises at the time, the designated member of the Senior Leadership team will always assume such responsibility. In the case of Learning Beyond the Classroom (school trips and visits) the Group Leader will assume such responsibility, as agreed with the Educational Visits Coordinator on behalf of the Headteacher.
Show more

9 Read more

National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children

National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children

The number of U.S. youth estimated to have had a runaway/thrownaway episode in 1999 is 1,682,900 (see table 1). Of these, an estimated 628,900, or 37 per- cent, were “caretaker missing” youth. Only an estimated 357,600 youth, or 21 percent of all runaways/thrown- aways, were reported missing to police or to a missing children’s agency for purposes of locating them. (See diagram on page 3.) Based on 17 indicators of harm or potential risk, 1,190,900 of the runaway/thrownaway youth (71 percent) were estimated to be endangered. The NIS–3 data were used to get a sense of the number of permanently abandoned children, who probably were not well counted in the NISMART–2 surveys. An esti- mated 56,900 children were permanently abandoned in 1993, the last year that the NIS was conducted. These children are not included in subsequent tables and dis- cussions in this Bulletin. Had the analyses included these children, the study findings would not have been substantively altered, since abandoned children would have comprised an extremely small portion (3 percent) of all runaways/thrownaways. 6
Show more

13 Read more

National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children

National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children

An analogy from the medical domain offers context for under- standing the implications at both levels. The symptom of chest pain can arise from many different sources—some relatively minor (indigestion, muscle sprain), some potentially very serious (heart attack, gall bladder attack). Only with a differential diagnosis is it possible to know which special- ist to consult and how to address the problem. Similarly, a missing child can indicate a relatively innocuous situation (such as a misunderstanding about where the child should be) or something quite serious (a stereotypical kid- napping). Caretakers and others who are attempting to find an individual missing child need to know why the child is missing—the type of episode—in order to resolve the crisis. Policymakers who are attempting to address the broader problem of missing children need information about the relative frequency of the different types of episodes in order to develop effective strategies for reducing the problem and design appropriately scaled interventions. Other Bulletins in this series contribute to the policymaking effort by providing details from NISMART–2 about children who experienced each type of episode.
Show more

13 Read more

Broadening notions of 'missing persons' to increase social inclusion, public empathy and healing: considering the case of children missing through adoption

Broadening notions of 'missing persons' to increase social inclusion, public empathy and healing: considering the case of children missing through adoption

A contrasting scenario regarding public empathy for missing children appears to be thosefamilies whose children are physically missing and their absence is deeply grieved, but their whereabouts may have a legal explanation, for example, in the case of closed and forced adoptions. Adopted children normally are not conceptualised as ‘missing’ even though they are absent from the lives of their biological parents. Similarly, the Stolen Generation, British child migrants and Forgotten Australians commonly were not perceived as missing persons, except perhaps by their families, even when their families described their children as being ‘taken’, or ‘stolen’ (Ekermann, et al., 2008, p. 76; Hancox, 2011). Mounting literature in Australia, the United Kingdom and elsewhere provides evidence that the subsequent unresolved, ambiguous loss resulted in ongoing, episodic grief, trauma and serious mental health issues, including suicide (Askren & Bloom, 1999; Carabas & Harter, 2005; Edwards & Read, 1989; Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, 1997; Cole, 2008; 1 st Author, 2008; Higgins, 2010; Humphreys, 1995; McNiece, 2006). Despite parents’ suffering, such stories remained comparatively unspoken, excluded and hidden from view.
Show more

20 Read more

National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children

National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children

The period between 1988 and 1999 saw significant mobi­ lization on behalf of missing children. Law enforcement officers received special training, and public awareness grew as a result of media coverage and educational pro­ grams disseminated to schools and families. Have these efforts made a difference? What else should be done? The kinds of data collected thus far are of limited use in answering these questions. Data gathered more fre­ quently and more locally could provide a tool for public policy analysis that might lead to even greater effective­ ness in combating the problem of missing children.
Show more

9 Read more

National Estimates of Children Missing Involuntarily or for Benign Reasons.

National Estimates of Children Missing Involuntarily or for Benign Reasons.

Policymakers should recognize that children who become missing involuntarily because they are lost, injured, or stranded are a significant part of the overall missing children problem. MILI cases call for collabora­ tion between law enforcement and a variety of other agencies, including the medical and public health com­ munity, forest rangers and game wardens, and other civil authorities. Agencies that respond to missing children cases should be prepared to respond in MILI cases, and responders should receive training in how to differentiate MILI episodes from other kinds of missing children episodes. MBE episodes are equivalent to mistakenly triggered burglar or fire alarms. Minimizing the amount of time and effort these situations demand from law enforcement should be an important policy goal. Public education on ways to avoid such mishaps and miscom­ munications and using successful search strategies for resolving such episodes may be helpful.
Show more

13 Read more

Dealing with missing phase and missing data in phylogeny based analysis

Dealing with missing phase and missing data in phylogeny based analysis

The analysis of the GAW15 simulated data allowed us to confirm the power of phylogeny-based tests to identify several DS sites located in the same region. We have shown that the method is particularly powerful to identify locus DR as a susceptibility site. This may be explained by the very high risks attributed to individuals carrying the DR4 allele. The method also allowed us to detect locus C, generally as the second best site and with a lower power than DR (Figure 3 shows more errors on the second best site than on the best site). However, this locus only increases the risk in women, and our analysis has been performed regardless of the sex of the individuals. Our results show that the use of a multiple imputation method to reconstruct haplotypes allows a better detec- tion of the DS sites in the presence of missing data than the use of the best haplotypic configuration. In particular, it is more accurate (the DS sites are often the only one
Show more

5 Read more

Missing Amplification Effect: Focusing Missing Leads to Low Happiness Experience

Missing Amplification Effect: Focusing Missing Leads to Low Happiness Experience

The “missing amplification effect” is the conclusion that people give higher weights at the center events, which has important practical value. The reason that focusing missing leads low well-being is “missing amplifi- cation effect”. After finding the root cause, people can guide them to do cognitive reappraisal to their missing, and control missing psychological perception in a reasonable range. Not too much attention to missing part, and appropriate to focus on other positive events. Reducing the missing degree of amplification, the happy expe- rience will be rising.
Show more

7 Read more

Keynes’s missing axioms

Keynes’s missing axioms

Let us suppose somebody looks at the Allais-Identity 32, which states that retained profit for the economy as a whole is equal to the difference of the business sector’s investment expen[r]

33 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...