Team-Based

Top PDF Team-Based:

Team-based stepped care in integrated delivery settings

Team-based stepped care in integrated delivery settings

The problem of team-based assessment and triage Stepped care can accomplish better coordination, at least in part because stepped care provides a consistent model of intervention for all team members; however, potential pitfalls related to stepped care assessment and triage remain. Team members may disagree regarding patient severity. For exam- ple, in the case of a patient with obesity, a behavioral health consultant (BHC) may suspect depression to be a precipitating factor in weight gain and propose treatment for depression in order to promote weight management. Alternatively, the PCP may conclude that the depression does not reach the threshold necessary for intervention and may propose services from a dietician as the frontline intervention. Second, members of the team may disagree regarding what is the least invasive inter- vention. In the preceding example, the PCP may propose a low-dose anti-depressant as the least intensive intervention, while the BCP may advocate for a treatment group or eHealth intervention. Finally, communication regarding assessment and triage must be resolved. With the PCP acting as the team “quarterback,” do all stepped care treatment decisions need to be cleared with this provider before implementation? Can a BCP implement an intervention and discuss the intervention with the PCP after the visit? Is it important that this commu- nication be in person?
Show more

8 Read more

Team-based comanagement of diabetes in rural primary care

Team-based comanagement of diabetes in rural primary care

The integrated nature of this team resulting from co- location is unusual in both the autonomy given to its nonphysician providers and the opportunity for regular contact and patient updates that occur between physi- cians and other team members. When a physician initi- ates a referral to the team, all members have full access to the patient’s electronic medical record (EMR) and all members are able to complete their charting notes, med- ication adjustments, and updates to the medical sum- mary on the same system. Referrals made to the team are not limited by age, diagnostic, or severity-of-illness barriers, in contrast to other models of team-based pri- mary care in which referrals might only be accepted for
Show more

8 Read more

THE ROLE OF EFFICACY IN TEAM BASED ORGANIZATIONS USING THE HOLISTIC APPROACH: IMPACT AND IMPLICATIONS AND A CALL FOR FURTHER RESEARCH

THE ROLE OF EFFICACY IN TEAM BASED ORGANIZATIONS USING THE HOLISTIC APPROACH: IMPACT AND IMPLICATIONS AND A CALL FOR FURTHER RESEARCH

Additionally, besides overcoming the uncertainties of globalization, this presentation also aims to show how team based organizations and self-management is crucial in changing the attitudes and behaviors of individuals in organizations. The problem with Fordism and bureaucracies was that their management was based on control. Workers that were controlled showed forms of resistance that threaten the goals of the organizations (James; Jones& Roos, 1990: 38). Due to rationalization as we noted, there has been a separation between conception and execution of a task, and the emergence of very specialized and repetitive tasks that do not require much mental or physical input (Sites, 2004: 71-72). Due to this, workers find ways of coping with their monotonous jobs such as daydreaming and reveries. By creating daydreams and reveries, workers create relative satisfaction and an escape from their rather boring jobs (Sites, 2004: 73). When work requires little human intervention, workers find an escape by creating imaginations of places they would like to be, of things they wish to do, create internal speeches and monologues, and so on; that all occupy them through their drowning hours of work (Sites, 2004: 81). People develop and construct an imaginary ‘self’ and as long as the forms of work they engage in are specialized, monotonous and require little skill and human intervention, and when workers know that their contribution is a small part of the entire work process (Sitas, 2004: 86). Hence the background and introduction also emphasizes the need to assess the role of TBO and self management on the attitudes, behavior and mind shifts of workers.
Show more

5 Read more

Implementation of modified team-based learning within a problem based learning medical curriculum: a focus group study

Implementation of modified team-based learning within a problem based learning medical curriculum: a focus group study

Introduced over half a century ago, problem-based learning (PBL) has long been accepted as a cornerstone in many medical education curricula worldwide. How- ever, in re-designing curricula, medical educators need to balance producing graduates with contemporary attributes, where the learning environment is resource challenged, in both the higher education and health sectors. Team-based learning (TBL) has been proposed as a potential instructional method which can retain the educational strengths of PBL, and achieve these in a more efficient way. One of the attractions of TBL is that using fewer tutors solves many resource challenges, in- cluding rising student numbers and limited availability of clinicians to teach [1, 2]. What has not been fully explored, is the learning strategies that students use when taking part in TBL, and how these compare with the strategies students use in PBL. This study addresses the question of the student learning experience within a PBL curricula that was piloting the use of TBL. By understanding students’ learning experiences, future itera- tions of TBL may demonstrate improved outcomes [3].
Show more

7 Read more

Development of a customised software module within the Moodle LMS for team-based PBL courses

Development of a customised software module within the Moodle LMS for team-based PBL courses

The examiner‟s role is to directly interact with the application. He or she can check that the teams are created correctly; make modifications if needed, and respond to student drop/add requests during the semester. While all of the team organising will be done by the program, late changes must still be made manually by the examiner. For the assessment manager, each staff will have access to each of the assessments as well as the sections that they have been delegated to mark. When the staff members are finished marking, their contributions will be collated with the assessment results for other sections of the assessment. This team based result will then be filtered through a peer assessment formula, and automatically produce an individual result.
Show more

8 Read more

How professional capital and team heterogeneity affect the demands of online team-based medical service

How professional capital and team heterogeneity affect the demands of online team-based medical service

Although this study makes significant contributions to theory and practice, it also has several limitations. First, the study uses cross-sectional data, instead of scientific panel data, which is taken from one OHC in China at the early stage of development when resources owned by MTs are in shortage, and there exists “New Entry De- fects”, so continuous study is required, and future exten- sions could focus on comparative or comprehensive studies of one-on-one visits and MTs. In addition, we have not examined the cooperation mechanism for each team in our study. Further, there is medical information that cannot be integrated into the model. Patients with different symptoms and diseases typically ask for help from multiple departments, so the receivers of services would vary dependent on the specialties, symptoms, and diseases; in addition, this related information is difficult to obtain and measure. The final limitation relates to team heterogeneity. Although two aspects above could represent team heterogeneity well, according to related researches, there is a clear need for more work into the effect of different types of heterogeneity. The heterogen- eity of background, department, hospital, and region could be taken into account to study the delivery of team-based services, just as Espinosa et al. [68] con- tended that the different types of team heterogeneity among virtual team members can have different effects on team process and outcome. Therefore, further longi- tudinal research is needed to explore these aspects to fa- cilitate the improvement of service delivery.
Show more

15 Read more

Team based learning for first year engineering students

Team based learning for first year engineering students

Another pedagogical approach, Team-Based Learning (TBL) was firstly introduced in the literature in 1982 as a way to promote the benefits of small-group teaching in a large group setting, considerably enhancing students’ engagement and their knowledge retention (Michaelsen et al., 1982). TBL is promoted as a special pedagogical approach comprising four elements for implementation (Michaelsen et al., 2004): i) strategically forming permanent teams of 5-7 members (to guarantee sufficient intellectual resources), ii) Readiness Assurance Process (pre-class individual assignment, e.g. readings, followed by in- class Individual Readiness Assurance Test, iRAT, and Team Readiness Assurance Test, tRAT), 3) developing students’ critical thinking skills by using carefully-designed, in-class activities and assignments; and, 4) creating and administering a peer assessment and feedback system.
Show more

35 Read more

Promoting Collaboration Using Team Based Classroom Design

Promoting Collaboration Using Team Based Classroom Design

In this study, we investigated the impact of classroom layouts on modes of teaching and student engagement using evidence-based design. We compared the same course taught by the same instructor in two different classrooms: a traditional classroom and an innovative classroom. We hypothesized that the innovative learning environment, called Team Based Classroom (TBC), enabled active, team-based learning and fostered collabora- tion. The purpose of our research was two-fold: to show the impact of TBC design on student engagement and teaching methodology, and to provide a broadly applicable method of studying student engagement within the classroom.
Show more

6 Read more

Implementation of team-based learning in year 1 of a PBL based medical program: a pilot study

Implementation of team-based learning in year 1 of a PBL based medical program: a pilot study

A traditional and effective form of teaching within medical education has been Problem Based Learning (PBL). However, this method of teaching is resource intensive, normally requiring one tutor for every ten students. Team-based learning (TBL) has gained re- cent popularity in medical education [4]. TBL offers “an active learning and small group instructional strategy that provides students with opportunities to apply conceptual knowledge through a sequence of activities that includes individual work, team-work and immediate feedback” [5]. In its traditional format, TBL remains highly structured, with core design ele- ments, and specific steps [5]. TBL has the potential
Show more

7 Read more

Team-based assessment of professional behavior in medical students

Team-based assessment of professional behavior in medical students

Previously, a physician might have solicited the opinion of these members informally before completing a student’s assessment; now these members of the team can comment directly on aspects of student performance that they observe. Other authors have shown that non-physicians are able to evaluate the communication skills and humanism of physicians in training and practice (21, 22). We believe that using a team-based method of assessment also encourages students to interact more with members of the healthcare team and pay attention to how their behavior is perceived by their peers, coming much closer to a true 360-degree assessment of medical students than other studies which have claimed the same (23). Demonstrating the importance of collaboration with other team members is an important message to send to medical students in training (24, 25). We believe that soliciting the opinions of peers, patients and administrators is important; many of the comments provided by these groups are related to areas of performance not usually observed by a supervising physician. In our experience, the information provided to students using this method is mainly formative in nature. No student failed the assessment, and most of the comments provided to them were positive and encouraging. As each student was observed by up to 4 observers, and no single assessor had the power to fail a student, we believe this method of assessment is essentially a series of low stakes ‘mini-assessments’ which are cumulated into a final report containing all of the feedback received. It should be noted here that this method of assessment was only one part of a larger assessment plan employed in addition to other traditional summative methods including a multiple- choice examination and an OSCE. We believe that assessment is made more robust using a variety of tools to measure the student performance, and that this method may be one way of achieving the ‘frequent
Show more

5 Read more

Development of a customised software module within the Moodle LMS for team-based PBL courses

Development of a customised software module within the Moodle LMS for team-based PBL courses

The examiner’s role is to directly interact with the application. He or she can check that the teams are created correctly; make modifications if needed, and respond to student drop/add requests during the semester. While all of the team organising will be done by the program, late changes must still be made manually by the examiner. For the assessment manager, each staff will have access to each of the assessments as well as the sections that they have been delegated to mark. When the staff members are finished marking, their contributions will be collated with the assessment results for other sections of the assessment. This team based result will then be filtered through a peer assessment formula, and automatically produce an individual result.
Show more

8 Read more

Investigating the Applications of Team-Based Learning in Medical Education

Investigating the Applications of Team-Based Learning in Medical Education

In evidence-based medicine, student performance is reported to have improved when compared to efforts made under previous teaching techniques (20, 24). In 40 courses implementing TBL in ten different American medical schools, semi structured interviews between the Team Based Learning Collaborative and eleven representative faculty members revealed academic performance evaluated over two years was rated equal to or better than achievements made in response to previous teaching methods 9, 10). In gross anatomy (19, 22, 25) and in a psychiatry clerkship (11), students involved in TBL performed significantly better than on previous exams. In an internal medicine clerkship, however, no statistically significant difference was found with respect to student performance, as reflected via National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) shelf examination scores, between TBL and non- TBL content (12).
Show more

6 Read more

on the efficiency of team based meritocracies

on the efficiency of team based meritocracies

To our knowledge, this study is the first to show how team-based meritocracies sustain very high social contributions by nearly all members of the society even though rewards are shared within organizations. We show this with a theoretical model of the TBM mechanism (Section II) and its experimental test (Sections III and IV). For a large society the TBM asymptotically approaches the efficiency of an individually-based meritocracy. At the same time, however, it maintains the benefits that come with team- based, rather than individually tailored, incentives, such as cost-savings and cohesion. Even though the mechanism’s asymmetric, close-to-Pareto-optimal equilibrium is very complex, (Section II) the aggregate of experimental subjects seem to intuitively grasp this socially desirable solution and coordinate it reliably (Section III). This underscores a team- based meritocracy’s practical usefulness and may explain its emergence in the field.
Show more

53 Read more

<p>Using team-based revision to prepare medical students for the prescribing safety assessment</p>

<p>Using team-based revision to prepare medical students for the prescribing safety assessment</p>

and decision-making. 4 TBL has demonstrated results com- parable to lecture-based teaching, is particularly effective in improving academic performance of weaker students, 5–7 and is well received by medical students and staff. 5–8 During the fi nal year at medical school, a particular emphasis is placed on readiness to practice, with a focus on consolidation of knowledge and clinical skills, and development of non-clinical skills. The interactive nature of TBL, its focus on non-clinical skills development, and the active learning component, mean it is particularly well suited for fi nal year students. Team-based learning has been shown to promote student engagement, 9 as well as professionalism, teamwork and communication skills. 4 In addition, TBL has been shown to be effective in delivering pharmacology education. 3,7,10,11
Show more

6 Read more

Guiding Principles for Team-Based Pediatric Care

Guiding Principles for Team-Based Pediatric Care

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recognizes that children ’ s unique and ever-changing needs depend on a variety of support systems. Key components of effective support systems address the needs of the child and family in the context of their home and community and are dynamic so that they reflect, monitor, and respond to changes as the needs of the child and family change. The AAP believes that team-based care involving medical providers and community partners (eg, teachers and state agencies) is a crucial and necessary component of providing high-quality care to children and their families. Team-based care builds on the foundation of the medical home by reaching out to a potentially broad array of participants in the life of a child and incorporating them into the care provided. Importantly, the AAP believes that a high-functioning team includes children and their families as essential partners. The overall goal of team-based care is to enhance communication and cooperation among the varied medical, social, and educational partners in a child ’ s life to better meet the global needs of children and their families, helping them to achieve their best potential. In support of the team-based approach, the AAP urges stakeholders to invest in infrastructure, education, and privacy-secured technology to meet the needs of children. This statement includes limited specific examples of potential team members, including health care providers and community partners, that are meant to be illustrative and in no way represent a complete or comprehensive listing of all team members who may be of importance for a specific child and family.
Show more

9 Read more

Team based learning (tbl) in traditional curriculum: assessment of students' acceptance

Team based learning (tbl) in traditional curriculum: assessment of students' acceptance

Thus, this model is responsible for the training of professionals who dominate the most varied types of technologies but who are not very skilled at dealing with the subjective, social and cultural dimensions of people (Brant, 2005; Feuerwerkel and Sena, 1999; Carvalho, 2010). In andragogy, "the art and science of helping adults learn" (Knowles, 2005; Bellan, 2005), learning is shared responsibility between teacher and student - based on "learning by doing", valuing the student's previous experience, independence and self-management learning with practical application in everyday life (Hamze, 2010). In addition, TBL (Team-Based Learning) or Team- Based Learning is a strategy that has created a fertile area for medical education (Parmelee and Michaelsen, 2010). It was described by Larry Michaelsen, a professor at the University of Oklahoma's University of Management. In 1999, Michaelsen and David Ross conducted the TBL application with educators from College of Medicine of Baylor (Haidet, O’Malley and Richards, 2002).
Show more

5 Read more

Team-based learning (TBL) in the medical curriculum: better than PBL?

Team-based learning (TBL) in the medical curriculum: better than PBL?

An alternative to PBL that adopts a blended learn- ing approach, is Team-based learning (TBL), which has gained recent popularity in medical education [9]. TBL allows medical educators to provide stu- dents with resource effective, authentic experience of working in teams to solve real life clinical problems [10]. Our 2014 pilot study (n = 20) of TBL [3], indi- cated that students favoured many aspects of the TBL process, including the pre-class work, the in- class initial tests with immediate feedback, and the problem-solving activities. Students found the advan- tages of TBL over PBL included better engagement in learning, deeper understanding of concepts, and a sense of responsibility towards teammates [3]. How- ever, negative aspects of the students’ TBL experi- ence included limited time to complete problem- solving activities, and a de-emphasis on the student- centred approach involving clinical reasoning among student groups. In 2016, based on our previous TBL pilot experience, as well as wider literature eviden- cing the effectiveness of TBL in health education, we sought to incorporate a sustainable and standardised TBL model across the Musculoskeletal sciences, Re- spiratory sciences, and Cardiovascular sciences blocks of the Year 1 medical program. Key features of TBL principles were adopted, including appropriate alloca- tion of individuals to groups, prescribed out-of-class preparation, pre-class individual and team tests, im- mediate feedback, and problem-solving activities with all team work within a single session [10].
Show more

11 Read more

Implementation of a post-arrest care team: understanding the nuances of a team-based intervention

Implementation of a post-arrest care team: understanding the nuances of a team-based intervention

Providing a more indepth report of the actual imple- mentation of an intervention like this is crucial to allow readers to judge the quality of the primary study and contemplate how various implementation factors may have influenced the reported outcomes [27]. The find- ings indicated that while it may appear simple enough in design, the introduction of a new specialized care team like PACT requires very close attention be paid at the design phase to what are largely sociologic realities of interprofessional and organizational culture in order to ensure that the intervention has the best possible chance of effecting the desired change. This speaks to what is commonly referred to in implementation science as a lack of intervention fidelity. Intervention fidelity refers to the extent to which the intervention was delivered as it was intended and more importantly in the case where it differed, why that occurred, and what it meant for the study outcomes [27]. The PACT intervention was imple- mented differently than originally intended due to both organizational factors and a lack attention to and sup- ports for the complexities of a team-based intervention. It is actually possible that in fact this intervention did not achieve the desired effect largely because the advan- tage of using a response team to improve the use of evidence-based practices may have been diluted.
Show more

8 Read more

Team-based learning (TBL): a community of practice

Team-based learning (TBL): a community of practice

The learning needs of medical students are also thought to have changed over time. Today’s medical students are highly interconnected, enjoying teamwork and collaborative practice, and the use of social media for learning [3]. They are also reported to have a unique outlook on assessment, desiring continuous, explicit feedback. They want structured learning activ- ities, with clear expectations, and enjoy a sense of ac- complishment on their achievements. In addition to modifications in teaching methods, educators have embraced technological advancement in the delivery of medical education. Adopting blended learning models has the potential to enhance student engage- ment both inside and outside of the class room [4]. In particular, the ‘flipped’ classroom approach has the capacity to maintain the collaborative nature of learn- ing within large class structures [5], and is being in- creasingly adopted in health professional education [6]. The conflation of these issues has seen many medical schools adopt the model of Team-based learning in place of Problem-based learning [7, 8].
Show more

7 Read more

Intrathecal pain management: a team-based approach

Intrathecal pain management: a team-based approach

Responsibilities for optimal management of patients with chronic pain occur at the level of the patient, health care team, and within the health system. The role of patients and their families in the team approach cannot be overlooked, as patients are responsible for providing accurate contact information to their health care professionals, complying with scheduled IT therapy refill appointments, and accurately reporting pain or other symptoms (including improvements or decreases in daily function) and adverse effects. 6 Support

11 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...