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Wine Grape Information Kit. Agrilink, your growing guide to better farming guide

Wine Grape Information Kit. Agrilink, your growing guide to better farming guide

What is the future of the Australian wine grape industry? There are very good market prospects for the Australian and Queensland wine grape industry for at least the next 30 years. It is anticipated that another 40 000 ha will be planted in Aus- tralia in that time, bringing total plantings to about 100 000 ha. Production is expected to double within the next 10 years. At present there is a shortage of grapes, and wineries, especially those with young plantings, are looking to buy quality grapes. As these new plantings come into production, this demand may decrease.
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Addressing fruit exposure and sunburn in Queensland wine grape vineyards

Addressing fruit exposure and sunburn in Queensland wine grape vineyards

The Queensland wine industry is relatively new, and its development has relied on the adoption of a number of viticultural practices typically used in more established wine growing regions. While successful in other regions, these techniques have not necessarily proven to be best practice for viticulture in Queensland. Moreover, the wine grape growing regions of Queensland are climatically distinct from the majority of other Australian wine growing regions. Queensland has relatively wet growing seasons, often with severe peak heat loads. Queensland also hosts the most northerly and some of the highest altitude vineyards in Australia, which are therefore subject to high ultra violet (UV) radiation exposure, higher than any other grape growing region in Australia. This may be demonstrated by reference to UV Indices from Australian regions. The UV index is measured in capital and regional cities by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). From recorded data ARPANSA has developed models showing predicted maximum daily levels of UV radiation for each city (see http://www.arpansa.gov.au/uvindex/models/index.cfm).
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Assessment of Wine Grape Cultivars in North Carolina and Impact of Leaf Removal on Grape Phenolic Content

Assessment of Wine Grape Cultivars in North Carolina and Impact of Leaf Removal on Grape Phenolic Content

A trial of 10 red wine grape (Vitis vinifera L.) cultivars/rootstock combinations was assessed for viticultural performance in Dobson, North Carolina. The plot was established in 2008 as a randomized complete block design. Vine yield, fruit composition, and vigor were measured from 2010 to 2014. Cold damage was assessed for the 2013/2014 winter. Average growing degree days (base 10° C) for the site were 2184 with an average of 1125 mm of precipitation. Cultivars varied in yield (0.90 to 4.59 kg/vine), yield/pruning weight (0.8 to 9.5), soluble solids concentration (17.8 to 21.9%), titratable acidity (3.8 to 7.2 g/L tartaric acid), and pH (3.56 to 4.09). The cultivars Carmenere and Nebbiolo had unacceptably low yields (< 1.3 tons per acre). Carmenere, Grignolino, Nebbiolo, Tinta Cao, and Touriga Nacional had the highest soluble solids concentration at harvest. Aglianico, Grignolino, and Nebbiolo had the most desirable titratable acidity and pH. Grignolino, Touriga Nacional, and Tinta Cao were most affected by the cold and Lemberger and Merlot were least affected. Results from this study can help growers make decisions for cultivar selection in similar growing climates. Introduction
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User and provider perspectives on the supply and demand of future climate change information for adaptation decision making: a case study of the wine grape sector in Austra

User and provider perspectives on the supply and demand of future climate change information for adaptation decision making: a case study of the wine grape sector in Austra

Participants indicated that for long-term decision making they would like to receive information both about specific variables (particularly as regards extremes) and in the form of homoclimes; and for that information to be presented at spatial scales the size of growing regions (further discussion about required spatial scales is presented in depth in Chapter 6: sections 6.1 and 6.2). Participants indicated that future climate information in the form of homoclimes for both domestic and international wine grape growing regions is important to better contextualise their decision making, which is influenced by the globally competitive market in which Australian wine grape growers operate. This suggests that participants recognise similarity of conditions within a growing region as being a useful basis for aggregation. If future climate conditions were to change differentially within a growing region, that understanding and its role in the decision sphere would need to change. The use of homoclimes is supported by Chauhan et al. (2008) who presented current homoclimes for chickpea growing areas of India and Australia in an attempt to find new areas in Australia that are climatically similar to India where chickpeas are commonly grown. The need to better place the situation in context of other important factors is supported by the finding of Letson et al. (2001) that if climate forecasts are not placed in the decision context then they are no longer valuable; similar assertions are made by Jacobs et al. (2005), Dessai et al. (2009), Fussel (2010) and Lemos and Rood (2010).
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Contract use widespread in wine grape industry

Contract use widespread in wine grape industry

The survey also included questions on contract provisions such as price incentives, bonuses and penalties; evergreen renewal clauses, which provide for automatic renewal unless one or bo[r]

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Associations among Wine Grape Microbiome, Metabolome, and Fermentation Behavior Suggest Microbial Contribution to Regional Wine Characteristics

Associations among Wine Grape Microbiome, Metabolome, and Fermentation Behavior Suggest Microbial Contribution to Regional Wine Characteristics

Conclusions. Microbial terroir likely involves multiple inter- acting aspects of microbial distribution, strain diversity, and plant-microbial interactions. The present study explores issues of regional distribution of microbial populations in grapes and wines, building on previous evidence that these patterns exist over larger regions, correlating with climate conditions (10). Not all regions and vineyards are microbiologically unique, and the pat- terns that distinguish them are not random. Instead, climate and distance between regions are associated with regional microbial patterns (10), and many other factors are likely involved, includ- ing processes that are selective (e.g., soil type, topography, human-driven agricultural practices) and neutral (e.g., species dispersal limitation across large distances) (30). Vineyard soil mi- crobiota demonstrate similar regional distribution patterns, asso- ciated instead with edaphic factors (31, 32), and plant-microbial interactions above and below ground may contribute to plant growth and development, leading to changes in fruit quality (32). Geographic distribution of microbial strains displaying diverse phenotypes appears to be another factor (14). Knight and cowork- ers (14) found that S. cerevisiae genotypes and phenotypes were correlated with geographic dispersion in New Zealand, and re- gional strains produced distinct metabolite profiles in experimen- tal wine fermentations. Regional strain diversity may also explain dispersion of wine spoilage traits, such as geographic patterns of histamine decarboxylase genes in lactic acid bacteria in wineries across Bordeaux, France (33). Regional strain diversity in the many other bacterial and fungal species involved in wine produc- tion may similarly contribute to microbial terroir and deserves further investigation.
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Areas Under Vines: Results of the Annual Surveys, 1979 89  1991

Areas Under Vines: Results of the Annual Surveys, 1979-89. 1991

Germany Greece France Italy Luxembourg TABLE 7: 49 63 81 87 114 150 Production of grape-must or wine from the area under wine-grape vines, broken down by yield class potential and actual[r]

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Popularizing Grape Cultivation and Wine Production in
India – Challenges and Opportunities

Popularizing Grape Cultivation and Wine Production in India – Challenges and Opportunities

Grape is a temperate perennial crop but adapted in tropical and subtropical regions in India. Maintenance and harvesting of optimum quality production requires specialized trellis system, two pruning and intensive crop protection measures since crop is prone to diseases and insect pests during adverse climatic conditions. These factors results in high cost of grape production. Cost of vineyard establishment is also higher than any other fruit crop. Maintaining and harvesting a good quality crop require higher input cost like labour, agrochemicals etc. The processing industry like wine is also fully dependent on imported plant materials of wine grape varieties, machinery and equipment of wineries, cultures of microbes/yeast and packaging materials etc. The cost of imported material is high and increases the cost of wine production, thus making it less competitive in global market.
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Areas Under Vines: Results of the Annual Surveys, 1979 90

Areas Under Vines: Results of the Annual Surveys, 1979-90.

Germany Greece France Italy Luxembourg TABLE 7: 3 15 21 25 36 52 .' 55 73 91 97 127 169 Production of grape-must or wine from the area under wine-grape vines, broken down by yield class [r]

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Areas Under Vines: Results of the Annual Surveys, 1990 95  1997

Areas Under Vines: Results of the Annual Surveys, 1990 95 1997

Production of grape-must or wine from the area under wine-grape vines, broken down by yield class potential and actual, estimated mean natural alcoholic strength, type of production and [r]

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A brief introduction to multivariate methods in grape and wine analysis

A brief introduction to multivariate methods in grape and wine analysis

Abstract: Real-world systems are usually multivariate and hence usually cannot be adequately described by one selected variable without the risk of serious misrepresentation. Analyzing the effect of one variable at a time by analysis of variance techniques can give useful descriptive information, but this will not give specifi c information about relationships among variables and other important relationships in the entire matrix. Multivariate data analysis was developed in the late 1960s, and used by a number of research groups in analytical and physical organic chemistry due to the introduction of instrumentation giving multivariate responses for each sample analyzed. Development of such methods was also made possible by the availability of computers. Multivariate data analysis involves the use of mathematical and statistical techniques to extract information from complex data sets. The objective of this paper is to briefl y describe and illustrate some multivariate data analysis methods used for grape and wine analysis. Keywords: multivariate analysis, data mining, wine, grape
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California’s wine industry enters new era

California’s wine industry enters new era

IN September 2002, California grape growers picketed a Gallo grape-receiving facility in Fresno, pro- testing the $65 a ton — just enough to cover picking costs — offered for their grapes. Meanwhile, swank restaurants were serving wines made from Napa Cabernet Sauvignon grapes worth $3,700 a ton. The wine industry in California and the world is entering a new era, as people drink less but better wine. Will producers of lower-priced grapes raise their quality enough to at- tract more upscale wine drinkers, put- ting downward pressure on all grape and wine prices, or will the wine-grape industry continue to fragment into distinct quality and price segments, al- lowing one segment to prosper while another languishes?
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VITISGRAPH  A graphic representation of Community statistics on areas under vines

VITISGRAPH A graphic representation of Community statistics on areas under vines

- Replantings - wine-growing year 1987/88 as a percentage of the total area under wine-grape vines - New plantings annual mean in the 80s.. - New plantings - annual mean in the 80s as a [r]

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Regulatory and institutional developments in the Ontario wine and grape industry

Regulatory and institutional developments in the Ontario wine and grape industry

Despite a myriad of government regulations operating at dif- ferent segments of the grape/wine supply chain, the Ontario wine sector has made significant gains over the last decade, as characterized by aggressive new plantings of V. vinifera vari- etals, expansion in the number of VQA wineries, technology innovation in viticulture and oenology, and greater recogni- tion of Ontario as a region that produces premium quality wines. Despite increasing import competition, sales of VQA wines are increasing, especially at higher price points (eg, CAD $12–15), attributed to increasing disposable incomes and lifestyle changes of the aging population.
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Vol 48, No 1 (2018)

Vol 48, No 1 (2018)

In addition to previous facts, it should be pointed that biosynthesis of anthocyanin is in direct correlation with soil quality, climatic conditions related to vine cultivation, selected cultivars, technology of planting and applied ampelotechnique, as well as with the ways and conditions used for vinification. Having in mind that the quality of a wine is very dependent on the content of anthocyanin compounds, the idea to place these compounds at the researching focus of the quality of Hilandar wines, has been confirmed by obtained results. These results point out to the highest quality of Hilandar wines and the high degree of positive differentiation in comparison to wines of the same or the similar cultivar composition of other manufacturers.
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Assessment of sensitization to grape and wine allergens as possible causes of adverse reactions to wine: a pilot study

Assessment of sensitization to grape and wine allergens as possible causes of adverse reactions to wine: a pilot study

Total IgE was above range in 13 participants (9 intoler- ant, 4 controls). Four of these also showed a positive reac- tion in prick test (No. 2, 7, 15, 16). Only one person showed specific sensitization with ImmunoCAP (grape: CAP class 2). This participant (No. 7) also suffered from severe allergy to pollen (grass: CAP class 6; birch: CAP class 5), and reacted towards CCD (MUXF3: CAP class 3). A preincubation of serum taken from the same person at a later time point with CCD-blocker led to a reduction of the concentration of MUXF3-specific IgE (2.06 kU/l be- fore, 0.25 kU/l after) as well as of grape-specific IgE (0.5 kU/l before, 0.04 kU/l after) while birch-specific IgE was not reduced after CCD blockade (91.2 kU/l before, 96.1 kU/l after).
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Stability Evaluation of Anthocyanin Extracted from Processed Grape Residues

Stability Evaluation of Anthocyanin Extracted from Processed Grape Residues

The residue of industrially processed grapes (Vitis labrusca L.), varieties Isabel (80%) and Bordô (20%) was collected in Cooperativa Agroindustrial dos Viticultores de Marialva (COAVITTI), in the municipality of Marialva, located in the north of Paraná state (latitude 23º29’06” S and 51º29’31”W). The material collection was carried out in January 2011, after a separation process in the wine making fermentation tank. The residue was pressed, in order to take off the wine excess, in a mechanical press and afterwards it was put in dark-colored (black) plastic bags with 0.5mm density and stored at -18ºC for further analyses.
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Do good things come in small packages? Willingness to pay for pomegranate wine and bottle size effects

Do good things come in small packages? Willingness to pay for pomegranate wine and bottle size effects

A variety of marketing tools like packaging, bottle shapes, designer labels and advertising (Boudreaux and Palmer, 2007; de Mello and Pires, 2009) are used by wineries to convince consumers that their wines are of higher quality and therefore worth a higher price. However, little work has been done on the signaling effect of bottle size formats on implied quality of wines. The bottle size format is one of the most accessible and easy-to-process products cues to which consumers are exposed and has rightly be given prompt attention, albeit for many other goods but wine. For example, Mathur and Qiu (2012) and Yan et al. (2014) provide evidence that consumers associate package size with quality of consumer packaged goods (the products used in these studies were potato chips, shampoo, laundry detergent, orange juice, vitamin pills and pharmaceutical drugs). Their results suggest that marketers can manipulate consumers’ perception of product quality as smaller package sizes signal superior quality, even in the absence of unit price information. In addition, Shreay et al. (2016) conclude that different package sizes of the same product may reflect product differentiation, which can explain quantity surcharges.
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Between the vines: a comparative analysis of wineries’ attitudes towards wine tourism in New Zealand

Between the vines: a comparative analysis of wineries’ attitudes towards wine tourism in New Zealand

Barber et al. (2008: 47) point out that, in the case of small wineries, “a well-stocked gift store can enhance the consumer’s wine visitation experience by promoting a sense of memory of the trip”. Souvenirs purchased during a winery visit have been noted as integral to the overall wine tourism experience as they also reinforce brand association (Dodd 1995; Richards 1996; Dodd & Bigotte 1997; Roberts & Sparks 2006; Hashimoto & Telfer 2007; Hall & Mitchell 2008). Dodd and Bigotte (1997) also found that 20 per cent of the overall tourist spend at wineries was on souvenirs and non-wine related products, making this a lucrative stream of revenue. Sparks (2008) examined how wineries in Australia could attract potential wine tourists and increase revenue by appealing to a set of common behaviours which she believed were exhibited by wine tourists; this particular study revealed that there were “three unique dimensions of wine tourism were found to exist, namely destination experience, core wine experience and personal development” (Sparks 2008: 1188). Donaldson (2004) also noted, in research conducted on Australian wineries, that domestic visitors tended to spend longer at one destination than those who did not engage in wine tourism, with over five nights spent on average in one location; it was also revealed that the same group of travellers contributed more than 76 per cent (Donaldson 2004, cited in Mitchell & Hall 2006: 321) to the local economy than other domestic travellers through dining out and sightseeing activities.
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Antioxidant rich grape pomace extract suppresses postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice by specifically inhibiting alpha-glucosidase

Antioxidant rich grape pomace extract suppresses postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice by specifically inhibiting alpha-glucosidase

both the grape pomace extracts but not the apple pomace extract significantly inhibited yeast a-glucosi- dase and their inhibitory activity were stronger than acarbose, the commercial a-glucosidase inhibitor (Figure 1). It is known that a-glucosidase is sensitive to the pH and the pH of the sample extracts may affect the enzyme activity. In this study, the pomace extracts were diluted from the stock 20 mg/mL DMSO solution with 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) and the dilution factor was more than 1000 fold, thereby eliminating the possi- ble effect of the sample pH. Therefore, the significant inhibitory effects of RGPE and WGPE on a -glucosidase are attributable to the unique compounds contained in the extracts.
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