Top PDF A Holistic Approach to Knowledge Risk

A Holistic Approach to Knowledge Risk

A Holistic Approach to Knowledge Risk

To reduce the risk of knowledge loss in many organizations there are programs designed for phased or flexible retirement aiming at retaining older workers in various forms and creating a necessary time for assessing their critical knowledge. That knowledge can be captured and integrated into some knowledge bases, or a good part of it can be transferred to other workers through sharing or mentoring processes. Mentoring is an old process by which knowledge from a more knowledgeable individual is passed progressively toward a less knowledgeable one. It is well-known the mentoring done by Aristotle for the young Alexander. Today, mentoring evolved into coaching, which becomes in business a kind of micromanagement helping small business managers and entrepreneurs to learn and grow in their enterprises. Mentoring is based on the willingness of older or more experienced people to teach younger ones, transferring to them not only cognitive knowledge but also emotional and spiritual knowledge. According to Hatton-Yeo and Telfer (2010, p.6), “A key element that differentiates mentoring from other forms of learning and support is that it is specifically designed to benefit all participants. Research consistently finds that mentors report having benefited as much from the process as those they have been mentoring”.
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Grasping the hydra: the need for a holistic and systematic approach to disaster risk reduction

Grasping the hydra: the need for a holistic and systematic approach to disaster risk reduction

Systems approaches and results when ignoring interdependencies Disaster risk is complex. However, it is not the only area in which complexity constitutes a daunting challenge to scientific inquiry. Living organisms, the brain, society, the climate, ecosystems and computers are only a few other exam- ples. What scholars in these areas have in common is that they are focusing on something functioning as a whole but made up of a multitude of parts and pro- cesses. Living organisms are made up by the complex interaction of a myriad of cells, the brain is a vast network of neurals transmitting signals, society is made up by individuals and organisations, etc. Some of these scholars find that one way of managing and trying to learn from this complexity is to look upon their entity under study as a system, as von Bertalanffy (1960) did regarding the living organism, Ashby (1960) regarding the brain and Buckley (1968) regarding soci- ety. A system is here defined as “a group of interacting, interrelated, or interde- pendent elements forming a complex whole” (American Heritage Dictionary, 2000). Systems approaches are thus not only focusing on the elements per se, but also on the relationships between the elements, which are crucial in order to un- derstand the system as a whole (Checkland, 1999; Skyttner, 2005).
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Holistic and Integral Approach to Residential Renovation

Holistic and Integral Approach to Residential Renovation

As active members of this society, we must act. And to act, we must be able to translate knowledge into useful concrete objects that respond to a set of expectations. Beyond the different states and scales that objects could have, the goal is to methodologically address the collapse between the theoretical and the practical world, and drive the negotiation process between the conceptual world of ideas and the real, experienced and sensory world. The most valuable tool we have developed to mediate this collapse is design. To improve the quality of urban renovation projects we need to promote a more holistic and integral approach, which apart from technical solutions takes into account architectural, social and historical aspects. We need to be aware of the social responsibility in relation to building projects, as the built environment plays an important role for creating a well-functioning society. The aim of residential design regeneration takes into consideration not only the architectural and urban planning aspects but also social factors, and the new demands on habitat and sustainability in the urban areas. This multidisciplinary approach is especially interesting. The experts, which will take part in this process, must rely on the relationship between social aspects, architectural issues and technical solutions. The projects may vary - from transformation of houses to generating possibilities for shared use of space or even to imagine a new employment of space; recovery of public spaces between buildings, energy rehabilitation and so on.
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Towards a holistic approach to policy interoperability in digital libraries and digital repositories

Towards a holistic approach to policy interoperability in digital libraries and digital repositories

To our knowledge, this is the first work investigating policy interoperability for digital libraries using a three-tier interoperability level. The first results presented here already indicate a high relevance for approaching policy interoperability not only from a technical perspective but also, and foremost, from an organisational and semantic point of view. We envisage continuing this work with real life cases and actual data, leading to the creation of a convenient approach that digital library practitioners and managers can use to address policy interoperability.

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A Holistic Approach to  Knowledge Management and Social Learning: lessons learnt from military headquarters

A Holistic Approach to Knowledge Management and Social Learning: lessons learnt from military headquarters

For ease of discussion, the identified enablers and motivators have been as- signed to seven categories: Common Identity, Problem Solving, Team Building, Access to Information, Develop- [r]

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<p>An interprofessional approach to pressure ulcer prevention: a knowledge and attitudes evaluation</p>

<p>An interprofessional approach to pressure ulcer prevention: a knowledge and attitudes evaluation</p>

PU prevention is considered to be a priority in clinical practice, yet participants demonstrated a lack of perceived personal competency or con fi dence in effective prevention. It is, therefore, unsurprising that a proportion of partici- pants considered that PUs were not preventable in high risk patients. Consequently, in light of the de fi cit in pre- ventive knowledge, an associated impact on the provision of preventive measures in the community could be antici- pated. However, this study has shown that knowledge and attitudes in the wider IPT can provide the basis for improved practice by integrating multifaceted knowledge from across professional groups. 58 Indeed, interventions for preventing PUs have been linked to the role of a variety of healthcare professionals. 41 However, more research is needed to establish collaborative practice and interdependence between professions. 59
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THE HOLISTIC APPROACH TO TEACHING SYNTAX

THE HOLISTIC APPROACH TO TEACHING SYNTAX

The students are perceived as individuals who have certain psychological needs to be fulfilled, particularly the need to be accepted and appreciated. In relation to this, it is important to promote a cooperative and supportive learning atmosphere,which will enhance their self-esteem, specifically their “task self-esteem” (Brown, 2000, p. 146) to facilitate the learning process This is supported by William and Burden that “teachers can affect learning in a range of ways that go far beyond the transmission of knowledge” (1997, p. 65). In addition, following Rogers’ humanistic approach to education” (1969, quoted by William and Burden), that “actual learning will only take place when the students are involved in active participation” (1997, p. 35), the students are actively engaged in various kinds of activities. The students are not just to listen to lectures, but to be actively engaged in various kinds of activities: brief reading, brain storming, group discussion, presentation, class discussion, individual work and group projects. Besides, new concepts are introduced on the foundation of known basis, what the students have known or experienced. The students are elicited to collect words and meaningful combinations as syntactic units to arrive at certain syntactic types. The whole learning process is parallel to the type of learning called “experiential learning”, which employs the learners’ “immediate personal experience” as the basis to approach and “organize the learning process” (Nunan, 1999, p. 5)
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HOLISTIC APPROACH FOR SUCCESSFUL CONCEPTION

HOLISTIC APPROACH FOR SUCCESSFUL CONCEPTION

In detail anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system has been described in Ayurveda. Generation of the ‘stribeeja’(dormant Graffian follicles) since birth and presence of ‘shukra’ in all body parts of the male proves the very well developed scientific knowledge of Ayurveda. Proper age of marriage as 25 and 16 for male and female respectively signifies the full development of reproductive systems. Spermatozoa and oocyte should be devoid of any abnormalities. Also the physical and psycho-hormonal status of the couple should be sound. Impurified body can develop vitiated beeja (gametes) which can leads to the hereditary and congenital anomalies. Purifactory treatments balances tridosha, rejuvenate all dhatu (constructive element) and normalise neuro-hormonal activities. Consumption of rice, ghrut and milk provides sneh ( lubricasy ), cholesterol and other energy sources for the body. Ghrut normalises disturbed hormones and psyche, rejuvenate reproductive system and heals injuries. [54] Cholesterol is the main precursor for testosterone and oestrogen. Good cholesterol is
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Evaluation of serious games: a holistic approach

Evaluation of serious games: a holistic approach

Evaluations addressing the learning dimension, i.e. the educational effectiveness of serious games, adapt Kirkpatrick’s [8] idea of an integral evaluation in terms of a four level process (cf. Fig. 1). The Kirkpatrick model forms the main theoretical foundation that has guided the elaboration of the evaluation framework and thus, it constitutes the basis for gathering comprehensive proof of the significance and added value of the addressed gaming technologies. On the first level, evaluation shall target the degree to which learners react favourably to a serious game. This reaction level entails two facets, perceived software quality operationalized by usability, as well as user experience and game enjoyment including variables like satisfaction, engagement or flow. Level two relates to the intended learning objectives and outcomes of the scenario in question. On this level, evaluation will investigate whether and to what degree learners acquire the targeted knowledge and skills by interacting with the serious game. Level three addresses the question whether learners are able to apply the knowledge and competences acquired during gaming in real world settings (transfer). Evaluation at this level is very challenging and ways for actually capturing at least partial evidence on this level still need to be further explored and implemented with the evolvement of the concrete application scenarios. At level four, evaluation addresses the organisational or institutional perspective, in terms of the pedagogical value and benefit of the serious games for training providers and/or educational institutions. This is slightly different to the ‘results’ level of the original Kirkpatrick model and includes subjective perception and reaction on the serious games’ pedagogical effectiveness. This evaluation covers the perspective of the stakeholder group, their experience of the co-design process (i.e. their involvement in the game design), as well as an analysis of costs and benefits for introducing and using this type of learning technology.
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Using a Holistic Approach to Completing an Investigation

Using a Holistic Approach to Completing an Investigation

When Jacob’s trial started his attorney requested a voir dire hearing. To say I was not properly prepared for this challenge is an understatement. I believe I answered some of the challenge questions very well, but many others did not. Some of the questions included: What is the accepted CSR methodology? What laws, theories, and principles direct an analysis and offer a foundation for court acceptance? Where is this discipline accepted outside of a judicial setting? What treatises had been written on this discipline and what were the names of the authors? What specific training did I have on reconstruction? Thanks to this challenge and CSR’s evolution I can now answer all of these questions. However, this did not help at the time of my first voir dire hearing. The author had no knowledge of prior voir dire hearings that challenged CSR specifically as an accepted forensic discipline.
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A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO MANAGEMENT OF PEPTIC ULCER

A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO MANAGEMENT OF PEPTIC ULCER

Smoking is a also risk factor for ulcer development. Alcohol in large quantities or high in concentration damage the mucosa, while moderate intake of wine and bear increased gastric secretion through their non alcoholic components. Psychogenic factors favour to ulcer development.

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Holistic Context-Sensitivity for Run-time Optimization of Flexible Manufacturing Systems

Holistic Context-Sensitivity for Run-time Optimization of Flexible Manufacturing Systems

Abstract: Highly flexible manufacturing systems require continuous run-time (self-) optimization of processes with respect to various parameters, e.g. efficiency, availability, energy consumption etc. A promising approach for achieving (self-) optimization in manufacturing systems is the usage of the context sensitivity approach. Thereby the Cyber-Physical Systems play an important role as sources of information to achieve context sensitivity. In this paper, it is demonstrated how context sensitivity can be used to realize a holistic solution for (self-) optimization of discrete flexible manufacturing systems, by making use of Cyber-Physical System integrated in manufacturing systems/processes. A generic approach for context sensitivity, based on self-learning algorithms, is proposed aiming at a various manufacturing systems. The new solution is propos encompassing run-time context extractor and optimizer. Based on the self-learning module both context extraction and optimizer are continuously learning and improving their performance. The solution is following Service Oriented Architecture principles. The generic solution is developed and then applied to two very different manufacturing processes. This paper proposes a holistic solution to achieve context sensitivity for Flexible Manufacturing Systems, whereby the knowledge created by applying the context sensitivity approach can be used for (self-) optimization of manufacturing processes.
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A measurable approach for risk justification of explicit and tacit knowledge assessment

A measurable approach for risk justification of explicit and tacit knowledge assessment

Knowledge has become a central organizing principle in society to the extent that knowledge management has become a mainstream activity in organizations. Nevertheless, knowledge- related risks remain relatively neglected in the risk management domain. Whilst knowledge reduces uncertainty and the associated risks, the increased knowledge intensity in organizations also represents a risk factor that has to be assessed. The paper describes and validates an organizational risk assessment approach that considers knowledge-related and knowledge management risks in an integrated manner. The approach makes it possible to calculate risk ratings in terms of vulnerability and likelihood for 50 threats to all activities and phases of the knowledge life cycle. These risk ratings are plotted against 24 potential risks in the human, organizational, and technical domains. To impress on management the significance of these knowledge-related risks, the risk ratings are transformed to approximated financial figures. The approach is applied to 10 Slovenian organizations, two of which are discussed in detail in the paper, to demonstrate that it can be successfully used in a wide variety of organizations. It is concluded that the approach offers a way to assess both knowledge-related and knowledge- management-related risks, that the costs that individual risks potentially hold can be approximated, and that for a diversity of organizations mitigation strategies can be suggested for the identified risks.
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A multidisciplinary approach to therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient

A multidisciplinary approach to therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient

The use of structured instruments offers several potential advantages to a system of care. First, standardized use of suicide risk assessment measures helps establish consistent documentation, communication, tracking, and standards of care across treatment settings and disciplines, facilitating informed care, regardless of how familiar a provider may be with a patient. Second, such tools can be deployed by a wide array of clinicians. There are very few restrictions by disci- pline associated with the administration of the C-SSRS, the BSS, the BHS, or the RFL; each is relatively easy and takes little time to administer. Furthermore, use of these measures will help standardize statements regarding risk, as providers may have widely different experiences and knowledge of sui- cide risk assessment. Also, the use of structured instruments in primary care or ED settings may allow for providers who are less comfortable directly asking about suicidal thoughts or behaviors to begin a conversation with a patient.
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A clinical approach to obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease

A clinical approach to obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease

Abstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, and increased mortality. Epidemiological studies have established these associations, and there are now numerous experimental and clinical studies which have provided information on the possible underlying mechanisms. Mechanistic proof-of-concept studies with surrogate endpoints have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has the potential to reverse or at least to attenuate not only OSA but also the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with OSA. However, no randomized studies have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by CPAP improves clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular risk factors and/or established cardiovascular disease and concomitant OSA. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of OSA as a potential cardiovascular risk factor, the impact of OSA on cardiac function, the role of OSA as a modifier of the course of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure, and the insights from studies evaluating the impact of CPAP therapy on the cardiovascular features associated with OSA.
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Holistic perspectives on learning and knowledge : An awarding body perspective

Holistic perspectives on learning and knowledge : An awarding body perspective

Nonaka and Takeuchi (1995) argue that innovation and KM are intimately linked. According to Senge (2006), innovation is the result of a recombination of conceptual and physical materials that were formerly in existence. In other words, innovation is the combination of a firm’s existing knowledge resources to create new knowledge. The primary task of the innovating firm is therefore to reconfigure existing knowledge assets and resources and to discover new knowledge (Galunic and Rodan, 1998; Grant, 1996; Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995). Both exploration and exploitation of knowledge have been revealed to contribute to the innovativeness of firms and to its competitive advantage (Swan et al., 1999; Hall and Andriani, 2002; Levinthal and March, 1993; March, 1991). Various studies focus on the role of KM in the innovation process. The results found by Senge (1990) substantiate the vital role which KM has for the knowledge dispensation capability and in turn, on speed and activity of innovation. Huergo (2006) supports the positive role technology management plays for the likelihood and success of firm innovations. Yang (2005) provides a very different approach. He hypothesises that knowledge incorporation and knowledge innovation improve new product performance, via the moderating effects of marketing and manufacturing competencies, knowledge acquisition, and knowledge dissemination. This seems to be supported by Brockman and Morgan, (2003). They argue that the KM tools ‘use of innovative information’, ‘efficient information gathering’ and ‘shared interpretation’ improve the performance and innovativeness of new commodities.
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Holistic approach to prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a family setting

Holistic approach to prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a family setting

better glycemic control (HbA 1c 6.5% versus 7.3%; 6.4% versus 7.5%; and 6.9% versus 8.4%, respectively), they failed to show significant benefit, and in the ACCORD trial, there was exces- sive mortality (mostly cardiovascular) in the intervention arm, necessitating its early discontinuation. The patients in these trials were mostly middle aged and older, with long duration of DM and high CVD risk. The evidence from these trials would therefore not to support intensive glycemic control in an elderly patient because with long-standing T2DM, there is likely to be hypoglycemic unawareness, with consequent risks of severe hypoglycemic events. In addition, advanced age increases a person’s risk for falls and fractures related to underlying osteoporosis, especially in women. This may be worsened by hypoglycemic spells. Aggressive therapy and tight glycemic control may do more harm than good, therefore looser HbA 1c targets (,7.5%–8%) may be acceptable for such individuals. Regardless, the individual should be actively involved in the decision about their glycemic control. In a long-standing DM patient, the natural history of T2DM with progressive beta- cell failure results in the eventual necessity of insulin therapy. It can be challenging for a patient to accept the initiation of insulin therapy, so in administering DSME, the necessity for insulin treatment has to be explained, emphasizing that it does not indicate a “failure” on the part of the patient or the management team. A simplified regimen (eg, basal insulin plus metformin) can be used initially in concordance with self-mon- itoring of blood glucose. 41 It is essential to educate the patient
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Changing the culture of financial regulation: a corporate governance approach

Changing the culture of financial regulation: a corporate governance approach

has failed to fully consider the role Corporate Governance can play as part of a multi-faceted approach. The chapter intends to highlight the current issues around two key debates post the Global Financial Crisis. Risk based regulation and arguments of Financial Institutions being ‘Too Big To Fail’, to show that whilst financial regulation does help there are limitations in its effectiveness to mitigate against a culture of short-term gains to the detriment of credit quality and prudence. Within the financial sector risks are a major issue due to the structure of the sector, as the financial system within the UK is dominated by a small number of large, highly leveraged institutions any failures can have significant macroeconomic consequences. Risk based prudential regulation was the main form of regulation used by the FSA during the financial crisis. The chapter attempts to analyse the reasoning and viability of risk based regulation, and in particular systemic risk as a catalyst for cultural reform. Systemic Risk and its relationship to the concept of ‘Too Big To Fail’ has been the fundamental debate following the crisis. What the chapter will show is that whilst regulation can resolve macro prudential issues such as systemic risk, it fails to mitigate against the culture of excessive risk taking. The only way this can be achieved is by taking a holistic approach to apply corporate governance mechanisms, alongside prudential regulation to drive cultural change within banks and thereby reduce institutional and systemic risk at the same time.
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A Holistic Approach to Understanding the Desorption of Phosphorus in Soils

A Holistic Approach to Understanding the Desorption of Phosphorus in Soils

Environmental Implications. The high P status in soils and the resulting nutrient pollution of receiving water courses are a major environmental concern. Considering both freshwaters and oceans, current planetary conditions exceed all limits for P discharges. 35 There is an urgent need to reduce total P in soils into environmentally acceptable levels, while maintaining optimal crop growth conditions. 33 The chemical exchange of P between soil solid and solution phase is expected to be the main mechanism in fl uencing the bioavailability of P to crops. The present work has provided new insight and an alternative approach for studying the dynamics and mobility of P in soil. High levels of available P were found using the DGT method among soils that represented a wide range of P indices. This unexpected result indicates that extract-based methods for estim- ating P availability may vastly overestimate fertilizer require- ments and the risk of on-farm nutrient use and loss. The DGT method described herein could therefore be used to improve estimates of crop P requirements while minimizing the use of mineral fertilizers and the subsequent risks associated with surface water nutrient enrichment and eutrophication.
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Knowledge as a holistic, integrated approach to future urban development

Knowledge as a holistic, integrated approach to future urban development

Creating a strong urban core which dually sustains and develops dynamic growth is a point worth contemplating whilst planning in the knowledge economy this may be through enabling economic strength in an attempt to address social exclusion and physical dereliction. Urban planners, designers and policy makers must come to terms with the evolution of this urban form and recognize the increasingly borderless nature of the contemporary city. Understandably, this does not mean that planning and design of physical urban spaces ought to be abandoned altogether but should encompass and extend to these new approaches. As the result of virtualization and dematerialization, the concept of the city itself has been undergoing a continuous state of change in the urban form. With the emergence of governance in our everyday life and its implementation in nearly all aspects, it has not gone by unnoticed in the urban planning world. However, it has yet to encompass the overall concept of urban cities to unveil them from the confines of the administrative realm to be better able to understand how they will function in the future. With the emergence of these new examples, cities can no longer be seen as static unitary bodies that cannot excel or function beyond their physical boundaries. Bearing that in mind, not only are the physical properties of the city being contemplated, but also the social and demographic context too. The world no longer harbors citizens from one sole place, but rather a diverse multitude of cultures and traditions, the purpose of these new urban formations should be able to cater to this diversity and rise up to the challenges being faced. With the establishment of this platform, cities are no longer urban boundaries that are set in concrete, but merely a web of extensive interactions developed and supported by communication networks. However, we cannot rule out altogether the importance of the physical and monetary aspect of the city. Transportation hubs, public areas and open spaces are still mandatory to interconnect citizens, potentially granting the diversity and frequency of human contacts essential for many urban activities. In 2003, Bertolini coined the term ‘mobility environments' to such places. Their quality not only depends on the features of each location but also on the characteristics of their visitors. Urban planning and design should be effective, and adequate in conceptualizing this growing openness of the urban system needed, and be able to focus on this new urban dimension.
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