Top PDF Working With Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice

Working With Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice

Working With Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice

Section 1 focuses on the ways in which teachers are seeking to transform ped- agogies around academic writing and reading and re-negotiate opportunities for teaching and learning. A key theme running across the chapters is a commitment to making visible the dominant conventions governing academic writing so as to facilitate access to such conventions, whilst at the same time creating opportunities for student choice and active control over the conventions they use in their writ- ing. At the heart of this section is a concern with the pedagogic relationship and the ways in which teachers seek to transform this relationship in order to enhance students’ academic writing, reading, meaning making and knowledge making prac- tices. Transformation is explored along a number of dimensions drawing on a range of theoretical traditions and using a range of data, including teacher-researcher reflections, extracts from students’ writing, drawings and sketches, students’ talk about their writing and examples of curriculum design and materials. The section opens with a paper by Julio Gimenez and Peter Thomas who offer a framework for what they call a “usable pedagogy” or praxis. In offering this framework the authors are tackling head on the question of the usability of theory and principles developed in academic literacies work (and indeed theory more generally). Their framework for praxis includes three key goals: to facilitate accessibility, to develop criticality, to increase visibility. Transformation in their work draws on traditions of “transformative learning” foregrounding the importance of making students “visible participants of academic practices.” They illustrate the use of their frame- work with undergraduate students in Art and Design and Nursing. The following chapter by Lisa Clughen and Matt Connell also centres on the transformation of the pedagogic relationship by explicitly connecting issues of concern in academic literacies work with the psychotherapeutic approach of Ronald David Laing (1965, 1967). They explore in particular two key challenges: how tutors can validate stu- dents’ struggles around writing and reading without trapping them into feelings of stupidity, passivity or self-condemnation; and how tutors can share their power with students. Their dialogue is an instantiation of the collaborative relationship between “academic literacy” facilitator and discipline specialist—a relationship that is also explored in many chapters in the book—as well as an illustration of an alter- native model of writing that can be used in knowledge making and a theme that is focused on in detail in Section 3.
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Working With Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice

Working With Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice

So, what does this mean in practice? What “further thinking” do these perspec- tives and questions generate in the context of Academic Literacies? In her appli- cation of open systems theory to the study of organizations, Vega Zagier Roberts notes that “a living organism can survive only by exchanging materials with its environment, that is, by being an open system” (1994, p. 28). In keeping something alive, boundaries are important. They can provide a helpful frame and hold a space within which something can live and flourish, such as a research or teaching com- munity, ideas and people. But if drawn too tightly, boundaries can isolate and close down dialogue and growth. Boundary setting happens both from within and out- side a field, and there are gains to be had by questioning which interests are being served by these processes. Where are the lines around Academic Literacies being drawn, by whom, and why? The rich and various contributions in this volume at- test, I think, to the inspiring fecundity of thought and practice that comes of ques- tioning and constantly re-thinking where the edges of the field might lie, and how permeable, and to which outside influences, they might most vitally remain open. There is another sense in which working with a notion of boundaries informs my sense of the transformative potential of Academic Literacies. Boundaries can delineate an intellectual and professional field, but also an internal space, where one’s own norms and assumptions—about the nature of writing and learning, about oneself as a teacher/authority and about the other/student—and one’s own experi- ences of difference, inequality and power situated in specific contexts and relation- ships, can be brought to the surface and worked with. In my understanding, this questioning, self-reflective attitude and challenging work of seeing and confronting one’s own assumptions is integral to the practice of teaching as informed by an Academic Literacies approach—and it is itself transformative, and empowering, for both teachers and students.
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Academic literacies in policy and practice

Academic literacies in policy and practice

I  met  her  at  the  institute  where  she  studies  just  before  her  classes  start  because  she   is  also  doing  her  social  service  in  the  mornings.  We  have  the  interview  in  an  empty   classroom  that  happens  to  be  available.  We  sit  and  our  conversation  starts.  She  tells   me  she  reads  about  everything,  but  she  enjoys  the  readings  that  ´stay  with  her   afterwards´.  For  instance,  she  has  read  some  fantasy  but  she  prefers  historical   novels.  She  says  she  likes  reading  the  news  and  she  reads  about  what  UNESCO  says   because  she  likes  to  be  informed  to  be  able  to  talk  to  people  who  know  about  the   topic.  Julia  seems  to  be  an  active  and  enthusiastic  reader.  However,  that  has  not   always  been  the  case.  She  was  asked  to  read  a  book  and  write  a  summary  in  high   school.  She  did  not  do  it,  instead  she  copied  a  summary  from  the  internet  and   handed  it  in.  Her  tutor  discovered  this  action  and  gave  her  a  book  of  her  choice  and   she  was  so  captivated  by  it  that  her  interest  in  reading  changed.  She  does  not  read   when  she  wants  to  but  whenever  she  has  time  because  of  the  school  workload.  She   reads  30  minutes  every  day  in  her  bedroom.  Julia  says  her  academic  reading  
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Working knowledge of academic practice : implications for professional development

Working knowledge of academic practice : implications for professional development

specific contexts. In the case of academics, the discussion is often framed in terms of the relationship between teaching and research and how these are brought together in day-to-day work (Gottlieb et al 1997, McInnis 1999, 2000, Winter et al 2000, Harman 2003, Henkel 2005, Houston 2006, Taylor 2007). The recent works by Clegg, Archer, Churchman and McWilliam cited above, which focus in various ways on the lived experiences of academics in specific institutional contexts, argue for more detailed and descriptive investigations of academics’ experiences of their work. In this argument, dominant accounts of the academy currently exclude consideration of the affective embodied self and thus do not give a full picture of what is happening inside the sector. Thus, second order studies that pay attention to how changes are experienced can, it is contended, support efforts to theorise what is happening in the sector as well as guarding against ‘over simple derivations that might be seen as global trends.’ (Clegg 2008, p343).
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Transformative learning in first year Indigenous Australian studies: Posing problems, asking questions and achieving change.  A Practice Report

Transformative learning in first year Indigenous Australian studies: Posing problems, asking questions and achieving change. A Practice Report

To better understand the rationale for this practice-based initiative, it is important to understand the historical and contemporary location of Indigenous studies in Australian education systems. As well as making provision for Indigenous Australians to be involved in educational decision making and to have equitable access to education, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Policy (NATSIEP) (Department of Employment, Education and Training, 1989), mandated state and territory governments across the country to ―provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures‖ (Craven, 1999, p. 18). Since its inception, primary and secondary schools‘ curricula and teachers have wavered between positive engagement and complacent dismissal with the policy in this regard, and the progress of NATSIEP at best has been slow (Beresford, 2003, p. 24). Tertiary institutions are also required to engage with NATSIEP and historically the implementation of the policy has been left to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies student support centres or units (see Lampert & Lilley, 1996). For example, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit at The University of Queensland, where we are based, administers an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Major program of study to address this aspect of NATSIEP. Recent trends in tertiary educational settings however see universities taking greater ownership of the seriousness and importance of teaching Indigenous Australian knowledges in their courses and are working towards embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives across the entire curriculum. This also includes taking on board Indigenous ways of teaching and learning and it is hoped that our research into the promise of PBL for Indigenous Australian studies can contribute further to this process.
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Development of students’ academic literacies viewed through a political ethics of care lens

Development of students’ academic literacies viewed through a political ethics of care lens

Student protest under the banner of “Rhodes Must Fall” and “Fees must Fall” in 2015 and 2016 have forced those involved in South African higher education and society at large to recognise that there are deeply rooted problems in the higher education system which are symptomatic of a lack of transformation. In addition to the call for free, quality education, there has been a resounding call for decolonisation of education. Decolonisation of the curriculum involves more than change of curriculum content or geographical origins of knowledge production. It involves profound change of pedagogies and the nature of students’ engagement with knowledge. If we understand academic literacies to be embedded in the way disciplines construct knowledge then the call for decolonisation of education and disciplines poses major challenges for those working in academic literacies development. Within this context a transformative approach to academic literacies is extremely relevant, mobilising a critical engagement with received traditions, exploring alternative ways of meaning-making and valuing the resources that students bring (Lillis and Scott 2007).
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Working towards inclusive education : aspects of good practice for gypsy traveller pupils

Working towards inclusive education : aspects of good practice for gypsy traveller pupils

In 1983, Her Majesty’s Inspectors of Schools (HMI) raised further official concerns. A report on The Education of Travellers’ Children 11 was published as a discussion paper. This was based on evidence gathered by HMI in the course of their routine inspections of schools. It described current practice with indicators of promising or good practice. The report reiterated the general conclusion running through all the research documents previously referred to, that “Generally Travelling children are underachieving and poor attendance only accentuates their difficulties”. A second edition of this report was issued in 1985. During the next decade, HMI, in addition to running teachers’ short courses annually on this subject, conducted a series of inspections of the provision made for Gypsy Traveller children in a large number of local education authorities. These individual published reports and other inspection evidence provided the background to a further formal statement in the form of an OFSTED report in 1996, The Education of Travelling Children 12 . This report detailed the progress made and again defined good practice. Serious concerns continued to be expressed, however, and these unsurprisingly related to issues of access, attendance and achievement. “Access to school for secondary aged children remains a matter of grave concern. There are possibly as many as 10,000 children at this phase who are not even registered with a school.”
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Developing socially transformative practice in Occupational Therapy: insights from South African practice

Developing socially transformative practice in Occupational Therapy: insights from South African practice

their patients come by reading local newspapers, listening to local radio stations and learning from patients. In doing so, the patient becomes the expert of their community and power is shared more equally between therapist and patient. Furthermore, therapists should seek and create opportunities to become more directly familiar with communities where their clients reside in order to learn about the barriers to participation and the socio-political factors that contribute to occupational injustice. While therapeutic goals, especially in clinic settings may prevail, these should not only be designed with the patient but importantly, with full consideration of the socio-political contexts into which they are being discharged. Notwithstanding, this may place somewhat unfamiliar and unconventional expectations on therapists and clients regarding ethical reasoning as guided by the Health Professionals Council of South Africa and calls for critical reasoning so that both intentions and outcomes are considered in deciding on actions in a manner where therapists always prioritise their responsibilities towards their clients, and communities, continu- ously working for social change.
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Alliances, assemblages, and affects: Three moments of building collective working class literacies

Alliances, assemblages, and affects: Three moments of building collective working class literacies

The second focus group, however, narrated an alternative story, which highlighted different events and connections. These participants told the story of an ongoing connection between adult literacy workers Sue Shrap- nel, based at Centerprise, a community bookshop, café, and cultural and educational facility in Hackney, and David Evans, based in Liverpool, who established Scotland Road Writers, a community writing group, in the late 1970s. Both were running writing groups and decided that members of Scotland Road Writers in Liverpool would come to London to meet writ- ers at Centerprise to talk about what they had in common and read their work. This meeting was followed by a day trip in a minivan to Liverpool, noted by Roger Mills: “and that was a big thing for the East-end lot because a lot of them had never even been out of East London so it was quite interest- ing to see Liverpool . . . you know . . . to meet these [Scousers, or Liverpool inhabitants] who were . . . you know . . . doing the same thing” (T2, 1). Other participants agreed that the Federation had started with the activities of Sue and David and that, subsequently, a meeting took place in the basement at Centerprise in 1976, with the eight groups that established the FWWCP. Here the narrative that emerges is of an unrecognized and unarticulated number of working-class writing groups “doing the same thing,” an insight only made possible through the materiality of travel and group meetings, but which again spoke to a countercultural space of activity.
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Literacies

Literacies

Literacies features the experiences of both teachers and students and provides a range of methods that teachers can use with students to develop their capacities to read, write and communicate. This book is a contemporary and invaluable re- source for primary and secondary pre-service teachers and literacy students.

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Transformative evaluation: organisational learning through participative practice

Transformative evaluation: organisational learning through participative practice

It is argued that whilst the evaluation methodology started out with a descriptive intent, it evolved into a transformative agenda (Mertens 2009). The evaluation methodology was transformative in that it involved a process of re-framing evaluation that enabled a more democratic practice (Mertens 2009). The process of co-creation changes the youth workers‟ role shifting from the more usual position of „objective‟ collector of data to that of co-researcher developing their personal mastery (Senge 2006). Using a collective approach to evaluation extends the process of evaluation by drawing in and on the knowledge of peers developing team work and systems thinking. The evaluation methodology supported the development of a shared understanding of practice which in turn may support the development of a shared professional identity (Healy 2009), and as Allards et al. (2007) state, collective reflection intensifies professional development. The methodology „transformed‟ the practice of youth work, by enabling a return to the notion of relationship and meaningful conversation as central to youth work practice. Finally, it transformed practice by enabling a re-framing of reflective practice from an individual pursuit of „problem-identification and rectification‟ to one of critical collective dialogue based on narratives of resilience (Reed 2007).
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Towards academic staff satisfaction of working conditions of service at HO Polytechnic, Ghana

Towards academic staff satisfaction of working conditions of service at HO Polytechnic, Ghana

involved the discussions about “productivity” and most especially about the relationships among teaching, research and professional service. The tables (Table 4.48 – 56) below represented the responses about the professional activities of teachers in Ho polytechnic which also could be an indication of commitment of academics to their discipline and the institution. Overwhelming majority of the respondents (92.7%, table4.48) indicated that their academic discipline was very important to them, whiles 78.2% (Table4.49) also rated their affiliation with the polytechnic as very important to them. This gives an idea about the reasons why the current teaching staff are still with the institution, since they consider affiliation with their discipline and the institution as essential to them. It could also mean that, those who love the institutions and they can find their discipline in the institution, may want to enter the institution for a job. This also means that, professional loyalty among the respondents is greater than that of institutional loyalty. When asked whether they preferred teaching or research, 43.6% and 32.7% (Table4.50) cited teaching and learning to teach respectively, which might also collaborated with the earlier response on workload, where 70.9% (Table4.37) indicated that, teaching constituted their workload, whiles 5.5% said research. Seventeen respondents (17) representing 30.9% (Table4.51) also indicated that the pressure to publish reduces the quality of teaching in the institution whiles 34.5% fully disagreed. Responding to access to funding for research in the last three years, 69.1 %( Table4.52) responded to no, whiles 30.9% said yes. Also, 27.3% (Table4.54) slightly agreed that, research funding in their field is easier to get now than it was in a five years ago, whiles 49.1% fully disagreed. Further to this, 58.2 % (Table4.55) of the respondents fully agreed that research activity is important in assessment of academics in the institution. With such a consensus, the institutions has to create the avenues and the conditions that will make it possible for individuals who wants to pursue their research ambitions to so, instead of the current low participation rate of 14.5% (Table4.50). On the other hand, 54.5% and 36.4% (Table 4.56) fully and slightly agreed that service to the polytechnic should be an obligation for all academics, and as such, management also need to create the opportunity for those who want to serve, to serve and must motivate others to do so through the committee system. This opportunities in one way or the other, may lead to attraction and retention of academics in the institution since it might meet the expectation and desires of some academics.
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How ideas of transformative learning can inform academic blogging

How ideas of transformative learning can inform academic blogging

I have argued so far for a kind of academic journaling which draws on transformative learning principles by being reflexive, action oriented, critical and not driven by instrumental considerations. But I finish by arguing that academics interested in transformative learning have things to learn from bloggers. In particular they can learn to be more open about their values and expe- riences and the fallibility of their research. They can in the words of this journal put the ‘I’ into the centre of their work. Without such a focus, academic writing can quickly become ‘reified’ – we forget that it is the product of a human being and invest in it an objective quality (an ‘itness’) that is in Freire’s term difficult to decodify. Aca- demics are socialised into presenting texts which offer certainty and, ironically, writers promoting transforma- tive learning can end up with the kind of didacticism and dogmatism identified earlier as a critical problem in my reading of Freire. Even within the action research commu- nity, which might be best placed to understand the fallibil- ity of academic knowledge, a sense of critical distance can get lost. Models of action research are often discussed as though they are generalizable - that one model is correct and the other is not. Instead we need to see knowledge as fallible – there to be critiqued and / or reconfigured to adapt to local conditions – even while we recognise the value of scholarship and the need to address subjectivity. If we use blogs to let others into the research process we can show that academic work is not value free. As Sasley and Sucharov (2014) argue, all of us:
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Case studies of local practice to reduce child poverty

Case studies of local practice to reduce child poverty

The guidance encourages local areas to consider which of the three key outcomes to their activities contribute to (i.e. income from employment is maximised; costs of living are reduced; income from social security and benefits in kind is maximised). Each case study identifies the outcome(s) that the practice is likely to contribute. Further information on outcomes planning for local action to reduce child poverty can be found in our sample outcomes planning tool.

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Social Studies as New Literacies in a Global Society: Relational Cosmopolitanism in the Classroom

Social Studies as New Literacies in a Global Society: Relational Cosmopolitanism in the Classroom

The last two chapters in Part II are particularly insightful because they follow the same cohort of pre-service social studies teachers as they move through the entire inquiry process during a multidisciplinary investigation into globalization and capitalism. Although a postsecondary example, it is clear that the challenges faced by these college students are similar to those faced by students at any age. Throughout the inquiry, the most common struggle for students was a lack of background knowledge, which significantly impacted their ability to develop an inquiry question, gather and evaluate sources, and synthesize their findings. Similar to the elementary and secondary students profiled in this part of the book, these pre-service teachers benefited from supportive spaces and scaffolds, and produced their best work when actively engaged with each other. The importance of collaboration to inquiry and its place in relational cosmopolitanism is especially clear in this example, for it was when students worked closely together that students were most likely to consider alternative perspectives and make multiple traversals across text resulting in a continually and collectively developed knowledge base. These two chapters also emphasize the importance of strengthening the inquiry skills of pre-service teachers if we want them to implement similar practices in their own classrooms.
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TRANSFORMATIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: UNRAVELING THE COMPLEXITIES OF KNOWLEDGE, PRACTICE, AND BELIEFS

TRANSFORMATIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: UNRAVELING THE COMPLEXITIES OF KNOWLEDGE, PRACTICE, AND BELIEFS

The final component of Guskey’s model is self-efficacy. Self-efficacy surveys were administered before the professional development experience and again after the professional development. Before the post-survey, student scores from both student surveys were shared with teachers (see Appendix D). Guskey’s idea of placing student outcomes before a change in self-efficacy derives from the idea that if teachers see positive student outcomes, this will in turn impact their self-efficacy. In this particular study, however, it appeared that the anecdotal observational evidence from students was more powerful than the numerical data provided to teachers. Within teacher reflections teachers’ comments support this notion. As Beth notes, “The students’ enthusiasm has a tremendous influence on my practice of science.” Likewise, Melissa writes, “Student engagement is always a driving factor for how I plan lessons.”
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Technological Determinism, New Literacies And Learning Process And The Impact Towards Future Learning

Technological Determinism, New Literacies And Learning Process And The Impact Towards Future Learning

four characteristics of new literacies, first is the emerging information communication technology (ITC) tools, application, media, and environments require novel skills, strategies, and dispositions for their effective use; Second is new literacies are central to full economic, civic, and personal participation in a globalized society; Third is literacies constantly evolve as their defining ICT continuously are renewed through innovation; fourth is new literacies are multiple, multimodal and multifaceted. And the other researcher from Hui (2018) provided that the divide between academic and everyday literacies by examining the practices and perceived effects of new literacies on academic learning, such as discipline-based on academic literacies including English language proficiency among college students in the digital humanities. In the 4.0 industrial revolution, learning is without boundaries; and the students learn everywhere and have unlimited access to new information. Learning involves collaboration with the team members and learning at the other places than in the classroom which interests them ( Hussin, 2018). The digital tools and an online forum such as social media are preferred as the students prefer to be integrated into the learning process. Social media as the tool is expected to be the tool with low access barriers and this thrives in the fourth industrial revolution ( Leopold, 2017). Kozinski, S., (2017) stated that the highlighted the following learning preferences for students are fully engaged in the learning process. The students welcome the challenges and enjoy the group discussion and highly interactive learning environment. It means learning without boundaries with unlimited access to new information. Because the learning is involved activity of collaboration with the other students in comprises fife over aching sub-elements provide a holistic view of literacy capability and are supported by detail given in the remaining sub-elements (NLLP, 2016). Moreover, the new literacies on the Internet and social media are one of the learning processes for students to collaborate and to assess the learning.
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Digital Literacies in the Lives of Undergraduate Students: Exploring Personal and Curricular Spheres of Practice

Digital Literacies in the Lives of Undergraduate Students: Exploring Personal and Curricular Spheres of Practice

Forty-five undergraduates were recruited to the research, studying across a range of subject areas including academic (single subject and interdisciplinary courses), professional and vocational contexts. We interviewed each participant three or four times at their institutions over a six month period. These interviews were normally carried out in small groups of three or four but some students were interviewed individually. In addition to these interviews we carried out a process of ‘shadowing’ by keeping in close contact via short e mail exchanges, chat and text messages. We also observed students during their interviews using a range of texts and technologies both specifically for their university work and in their lives more broadly. Our intention was to build up a picture of students’ literacy practices as they read and write, produced and negotiated digital texts, in different contexts and across modes. In addition, we also collected hard copy and electronic examples of a range of students’ texts both within and outside the curriculum. A rich data-base was therefore assembled, consisting of interview transcripts, electronic field notes reflecting on observation of practices, texts from social networking sites, curriculum sources, personal development plans (PDP), evidence of student engagement with a variety of digital texts and practices, written, visual, multi-modal and web-based.
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Towards a transformative and holistic continuing self-directed learning theory

Towards a transformative and holistic continuing self-directed learning theory

In education, we need to search for instructive methods that could support students. If SDL is effectively employed by educators, and students’ SDL readiness is borne in mind, SDL can be seen to be the casting open of the doors to learning, and should not become a trap in an ever-revolving gate of disappointment and despair. Instruction methods employed by educators in learning environments must therefore ensure that it complements the students’ stage of self- direction towards their readiness, and to support them in developing to be more self-directed over time. When students’ level of self-directedness does not match their readiness towards SDL, forcing them into this learning method can cause learning difficulties. Therefore, in such circumstances SDL does hold the potential of harming those students for life.
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Personal development planning in practice : a series of case studies

Personal development planning in practice : a series of case studies

review the resources needed to sustain the programme of activities after the pilot project review academic staff development and training in the light of the above • activities review th[r]

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