Changing pages and their Contents

In document Adobe Acrobat 9 (Page 139-143)

# 50

Managing Content Visually

Here’s a time-saving process that’s terrific for visual people.

Rather than extracting, com-bining, and deleting content through dialogs, you can do it visually using the Pages pane.

Here’s how to do it with two documents, but you could use as many documents as you can manage:

1. Start with two docu-ments, one to which you want to add pages (the recipient) and the other from which you’re taking pages (the donor).

2. Click the Pages icon in each document to show the thumbnails.

3. Select the page thumb-nails from the donor document’s Pages pane and drag them to the recipient document’s Pages pane.

4. A vertical black line indicates the location where the content will be dropped—release the mouse when you are in the right spot and the job is done.

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Figure 50b Choose an option for pages extracted from your document.

thumbnail(s) and choose Options > Extract Pages to display the Extract Pages dialog (Figure 50b). Make your choice:

Click Delete Pages After Extracting to separate the content from the original. Click OK to close the dialog; the content is processed and opens in Acrobat as a separate document using the prefix “Pages from”

in the filename.

Click Extract Pages As Separate Files if you want to create individual PDF documents from each page you select in the dialog. Click OK to close the dialog; select a storage location for the extracted content in the subsequent Browse for Folder dialog, and click OK. The pages are extracted and saved with the page number—for example, MyBigFile 22—appended to the filename.

Deselect both check boxes if you want to keep the original intact, and extract the pages into a single document.

Replace Pages: Suppose you have a PDF document that needs some editing that is much simpler to do in the source program. However, you’ve added several links and some comments that will be lost if you simply delete the pages—so what do you do? Easy: Simply replace the pages instead. The new content slides into place in your document, leaving all the work you’ve done in Acrobat intact.

In your source program, open the file and make the changes. When you re-convert the file to PDF, you can convert just the pages to replace (find out how in the sidebar “Pick What You Want” in #10, “Using PDFMaker in Microsoft Word”).

Do the Splits

Here’s a cool tip to use if you have several documents that you’d like to split more evenly, such as by file size or number of pages. You don’t have to open a document in Acrobat to split it, nor do you have to split one document.

Begin by choosing Document > Split Document to open the Split Documents dialog. Click Apply to Multiple to open a secondary Split Doc-uments dialog, where you’ll list the files to split. Choose either Add Files or Add Folders from the Add Files pop-up menu.

Select the files or folders you want to work with to include them in the dialog’s list. Click OK to close the dialog. The regular Split Document dialog opens—continue with the steps listed in the technique.

#50: Changing Pages and Their Contents

C h a p t e r S e v e n Transforming Document Pages

Back in Acrobat, open the document where you want to replace pages, select the thumbnails in the Pages pane, and choose Options > Replace Pages. In the dialog that opens, locate and select your replacement file. Click Select to close the dialog and open the Replace Pages dialog.

Because you preselected thumbnails, they are already shown in the dia-log. Click OK and then click Yes in the confirmation dialog that opens next.

The dialog closes and your pages are replaced.

Split Document: In the past, we’d have to perform extractions repeat-edly to break a document into several component parts, but not anymore.

Acrobat 9 now offers a feature to split PDF files into multiples based on different criteria.

Note

Any attachments in your document aren’t copied to the split component files.

Open your document in Acrobat and follow these steps:

1. From the main menu, choose Document > Split Document to display the Split Document dialog.

Choose an option for splitting—“Number of pages” (and specify the Max pages), “File size” (and specify the Max MB), or “Top-level bookmarks.”

2. Click Output Options to open a dialog where you can select a folder for storing the split files, as well as a method for naming the files (Figure 50c).

Figure 50c Specify how to store and name the components of your split document.

3. Click OK to close the dialog and process your document.

Delete and Insert or Replace?

What’s the difference? It depends on what else is on the page.

For example, you may have a page with a large number of comments, links, or form fields on it. If you merely inserted an edited version of the page and deleted the one you want to remove, you’d lose all your comments and links. When you use the Replace command, Acrobat replaces the underlying page, keeping the overlying content (such as comments, links, or form fields) untouched.

Power Deleting Instead of using commands to delete multiple pages, use the thumbnails and keyboard keys. Click the thumbnail of the page you want to delete, hold down the Shift key, and click addi-tional pages to select them, and then press Delete on the keyboard. The confirma-tion dialog opens asking if you really want to delete the pages. Click OK and the pages are gone.

Adding Document Pages

If you choose a PDF docu-ment, the pages are added immediately. If you choose another type of file, the doc-ument is converted to PDF before the page is inserted into your document. This is a great time-saver, since you don’t have to reopen the document’s source program and the file, convert to PDF, and then return to Acrobat.

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Delete and Insert or Replace?

What’s the difference? It depends on what else is on the page.

For example, you may have a page with a large number of comments, links, or form fields on it. If you merely inserted an edited version of the page and deleted the one you want to remove, you’d lose all your comments and links. When you use the Replace command, Acrobat replaces the underlying page, keeping the overlying content (such as comments, links, or form fields) untouched.

#50: Changing Pages and Their Contents

Insert Pages in Front Sometimes you need to insert a new page before an existing page in your docu-ment. For example, you may need to add a cover page to a catalog or market-ing brochure. In the Insert Pages dialog, simply click the Location pop-up menu and choose Before. Click OK and Acrobat adds the page to your document precisely where you want it.

C h a p t e r S e v e n Transforming Document Pages

If you combine several documents from different sources, you may find discrepancies in the page sizes or orientations. Use the crop and rotate features in Acrobat to get the pages looking cohesive. Read about rotat-ing in the sidebar “Spin It Around.”

If you are cropping a single page, display it in the Document pane; if you are working with more than one image, select the thumbnails in the Pages pane.

Follow these steps to crop a page:

1. If you have the Advanced Editing toolbar open, click the Crop Tool to select it. Then click and drag on the page to draw a marquee the size of the area you want to crop.

2. Double-click within the cropped area to open the Crop Pages dialog.

The area you drew on the document page is shown in the preview, like the box surrounding the bird in Figure 51a. The settings for the margins are already entered as well, based on the preselection.

Figure 51a An area selected with the Crop Tool appears automatically in the preview area of the dialog.

Tip

You can also select the thumbnail in the Pages pane and choose Options >

Crop Pages from the pane’s menu, or choose Document > Crop Pages.

There aren’t any markings on the preview when you open the dialog.

Cropping and

In document Adobe Acrobat 9 (Page 139-143)