Top PDF Experimental study for structural behaviour of precast lightweight panel (PLP) under flexural load

Experimental study for structural behaviour of precast lightweight panel (PLP) under flexural load

Experimental study for structural behaviour of precast lightweight panel (PLP) under flexural load

Each construction has its own structure part which is responsible to sustain the loading and prevent it from failure. Structures are designed to sustain loads and types of building to be constructed. Thus, ultimate load, cracking pattern and deflection of structures have a relationship to the failure of structure. The ultimate flexural load of panel will be influenced by compressive strength, thickness [4] and density [5]. According to Mustaffa, higher density of foamed concrete also influences the attained ultimate load of slab under test. According to Mohamad et al., two types of crack patterns were discovered on a panel which are flexural crack and shear crack. Flexural cracks started to occur between the point of loading (mid-span) where the concrete experienced high local tensile stresses as loading applied to the slab followed by a shear crack propagated along the slabs. Further increasing the load, the flexural crack propagated upwards reaching top of the slab with increased deflection. Finally, the panels failed by crushing of concrete at the spot nearest to the point of loading [5].
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Structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel (PLFP) with double shear truss connectors under eccentric load: preliminary result

Structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel (PLFP) with double shear truss connectors under eccentric load: preliminary result

PLFP was tested using Magnus Frame with 1000kN loading capacity. Load applied gradually until failure occurred. Figure 2(a) shows the experimental set-up, where the PLFP was clamped to reaction frame correctly in the position to get the targeted end condition. The eccentricity loading was carried out by applying the load at an eccentricity t w /6 along top edge of the panel length during

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Structural Behaviour of Precast Lightweight Foamed Concrete Sandwich Panel under Axial Load: An Overview

Structural Behaviour of Precast Lightweight Foamed Concrete Sandwich Panel under Axial Load: An Overview

Frankl et al.[16], investigated six precast concrete sandwich wall panels which were designed and tested to evaluate their flexural response under combined vertical and lateral loads. The study included panels fabricated with two different insulation types: expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulation and extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation. The panels were subjected to monotonic axial and reverse-cyclic lateral loading to simulate gravity and wind pressure loads, respectively. Based on the findings of this study, it is concluded that panel’s stiffness and deflections are significantly affected by the type and configuration of the shear transfer mechanism. Percentage of composite action achieved is near 100% can be achieved with CFRP grid shear connections or with solid concrete zones. It is also found that the use of CFRP shear grid provide an effective shear transfer mechanism in precast concrete sandwich wall panels.
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Structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel under axial load: an overview

Structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel under axial load: an overview

Based on the previous research, can be seen that the research of PLFP is still limited and there are still many weakness that arise such as the research done by Lian (1999). This study discussed about the ultimate limit behaviour of reinforced concrete sandwich panels under axial and eccentric loads. However, the numbers of the tested panels was also so small which is only 4 specimens were cast and tested to carry out the result of the research, , no generalised inferences could be drawn. Compared to the author research, the number of tested panels are 8 specimens which is we can compare the result by find the average of the result thus, to obtain the precise and accurate results. The ultimate load capacity for pure axial loaded panels was computed using expressions for design of solid reinforced walls. It was reported that some of the expressions applicable to solid walls could not be directly applied to the sandwich panel.
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The structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel as a load bearing wall

The structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel as a load bearing wall

My special thanks and acknowledgement are dedicated to the following individuals who have contributed to the research at various stages. I wish to thank the technical staff of Material and Structural Engineering Laboratory, UTHM, especially Affendi, for his continuous assistance in the experimental work. My appreciation to Koh Heng Boon and my other colleagues for sharing their research experiences and views. I would also like to thank Hafsah Khamis, Norwirdawati and Mohd Faizal for their help during the casting and testing processes.

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The structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel as a load bearing wall

The structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel as a load bearing wall

Stoll et al., (2004) investigated the effect of weight, strength, stiffness and failure mode of Fiber-Reinforced Composite (FRC) core in composite sandwich construction. In this study, dry fiber and preform foam are used in the molding processes to produce a fiber reinforced composite core panel. An FRC core pre-form was manufactured by cutting a foam board strip which was wrapped by fiber glass fabric around it as shown in Figure 2.3 and consolidating multiple wound strips into sheets as in Figure 2.4. Fiber glass fabric is added to the surfaces of the pre-form and the lay-up is infused with thermoset resin to produce a molded panel as shown in Figure 2.5. The fiberglass used in FRC test panel is E-glass fabric with G6 and G18 facing design. To enable comparisons of FRC cores with other core materials, test panels with 2.5 cm thick foam and balsa cores were molded. An 80 kg/m 3 PVC foam test panel was molded with the same facing design as the G6 test panels, and a nominal 150 kg/m 3 balsa was molded with the same facing design as the G18 test panels. The results of shear strength, stiffness and compressive strength on the FRC core were compared with the results taken from the tests on panels with PVC foam and balsa cores. It is found that the use of FRC cores increased the shear and compressive strength with only minor increase in core density (Table 2.1).
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Structural behaviour of precast concrete sandwich panel using recycled aggregate concrete under transverse load

Structural behaviour of precast concrete sandwich panel using recycled aggregate concrete under transverse load

Kabir (2005) investigated the structural performance of shotcrete lightweight sandwich panels with compressive strength of 12 MPa and tensile strength of 1.2 MPa under shear and bearing loads. The sandwich panels consisted of shotcrete wythes which enclose the polystyrene core. Three specimens are provided for horizontal bending tests, each sandwich panel is 300 cm long and 100 cm wide with the upper and lower concrete wythes at 6 and 4 cm thick respectively. It was reinforced by the diagonal 3.5 mm cross steel wires welded to the 2.5 mm steel fabric embedded in each wythe as shown in Figure 2.16. Tests for flexural and direct shear loading were carried out based on ASTM E-72 and ASTM 564 respectively.
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An Experimental Study of Welded Bar Sleeve Wall Panel Connection under Tensile, Shear, and Flexural Loads

An Experimental Study of Welded Bar Sleeve Wall Panel Connection under Tensile, Shear, and Flexural Loads

However, the tensile test alone is insufficient to determine the actual behaviour and performance of the grouted splice connection in precast concrete structures. The loads acting on the connection might not always be in tension. There could be other forces acting on the connection. Hence, experimental studies were conducted on the precast concrete frames with the connections of beam-to-beam (Aldin Hos- seini et al. 2015; Sayadi et al. 2014), column-to-beam (Ameli et al. 2015; Kim 2000), column-to-column (Tullini and Minghini 2016), wall-to-wall (Soudki et al. 1995; Zhu and Guo 2016) and column-to-foundation (Haber et al. 2014; Belleri and Riva 2012) to determine the structural performance.
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Study on precast lighweight foamed concrete sandwich panel (PLFP) connection under flexural load

Study on precast lighweight foamed concrete sandwich panel (PLFP) connection under flexural load

In Malaysia, industrialized building system (IBS) had started many decades ago but until now it is still experimenting with various prefabricated method. The governments of Malaysia also encourage the use of IBS and insist that the office building projects shall have at least 70% IBS component. To encounter demands from the growing population and migration of people to urban areas in this country, alternative construction method is required to provide fast and affordable quality housing and environmental efficient. One of the alternatives that already been studied is Precast Lightweight Sandwich Panel. Before we can introduce new innovative construction method, the construction details are an important factor in building design. There has not been any study on Precast Lightweight Foamed Concrete Sandwich Panel (PLFP) connection.Connection is important to transfer loads and also for stability. With regard to the structural behaviour, the ability of the connection to transfer forces is the most essential property. Every aspect of the panel behavior must be analysied. This study will only focus on analyzing the performance of two small scale PLFP walls with U-bent bars connection under bending in term of load-displacement relationship, modes of failure and its ultimate load capacity when connected.
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Experimental Investigation of Vertical Connections in Precast Wall Panel Under Shear Load

Experimental Investigation of Vertical Connections in Precast Wall Panel Under Shear Load

This Project deals with the experimental study and analysis of precast wall panel connections. The integrity of a precast system depends on connections more than the structural members itself. The connections between panels are the key factors which affects both the speed of erection and the overall integrity of the structure. The types connection proposed in this study is loop connection with trapezoid shear keys. The shear keys are used to increase the shear carrying capacity of the connections. The connection between the walls is called loop bars connection. Between the looping bars, one transverse bar is inserted as to ensure connectivity of all the looping bars. This connection produces a gap between the walls, which would then be filled with grouting material. The main objective of these experimental studies is to determine behaviour of loop bars connection under shear loading.
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Structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel (PLFP) with shear truss connectors

Structural behaviour of precast lightweight foamed concrete sandwich panel (PLFP) with shear truss connectors

This study is aimed to provide information about the structural behaviour of PLFP with shear connectors. It is able to get a clear and deeper insight on the structural behaviour and failure mechanisms of the PLFP with single and double shear truss connectors under axial and push off loading. The results from this study are very important to assist the design of the PLFP to be used as a precast wall system especially the ultimate load carrying capacity and failure mechanism. An empirical equation is proposed in this study which is able to predict the ultimate load carrying capacity of PLFP under axial loading. The equation can be used to predict the maximum load of sandwich in non-linear behaviour after the service load.
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Structural behaviour of precast lightweight concrete sandwich panel under eccentric load: an overview

Structural behaviour of precast lightweight concrete sandwich panel under eccentric load: an overview

Lian (1999) carried out a test program to study the ultimate limit behaviour of reinforced concrete sandwich panels under axial and eccentric loads. 4 specimens were cast and tested. The panels were 1.5m long, 0.75m wide and 40-50-40 mm construction, i.e. 40 mm thick concrete wythes with a 50 mm thick insulating layer. The ultimate load capacity for pure axial loaded panels was computed using expressions for design of solid reinforced walls. It was reported that some of the expressions applicable to solid walls could not be directly applied to the sandwich panel. However, it may also be noted that the slenderness ratio (H/t) is an important factor influencing the load bearing capacity of axial loaded panels, and the number of the tested panels was also small, no generalised inferences could be drawn.
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Behaviour of Bolted Connection in the Vertical Joint of Precast Wall Panel

Behaviour of Bolted Connection in the Vertical Joint of Precast Wall Panel

In this research 2 boundary conditions (B.C) are given to find out the critical stresses or maximum stresses of the element in the connection. In a boundary condition 1 base of the both wall panel is fixed as shown in fig-5.1(a),(b) and boundary condition 2 base of the both wall panel is fixed and left wall panel is restricted to movement as shown in fig-5.2 5.2(a),(b). Similarly varies contact types are given in Ansys to simulate the model. The co efficient of friction between the wall and cover plate is 0.57 taken from the paper Friction co efficient of steel on concrete or grout by BG Rabbat et al, Journal of Structural Engineering. For simulating each elements in connection its contact types are changed every analysis.
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Flexural Strength of Precast Concrete Segments with Joint Grouts

Flexural Strength of Precast Concrete Segments with Joint Grouts

mm) and polycarboxylate-based super-plasticizer. Mix proportion and measured compressive strength of the precast concrete is shown in Table 1. A precast concrete segment having a dimension of 200 mm × 200 mm × 200 mm with female-to-female shear key was prepared for the test. Two precast concrete segments were connected by cementitious grout materials. Three types of cementitious grout materials, i.e., ordinary cement mortar (W/C=0.4, sand to cement ratio=2, super-plasticizer content=0.6 wt% by cement), shrinkage compensating cement mortar (W/B=0.16), and polymer cement mortar (W/B=0.16) were prepared to fill a space between precast concrete segments. The space between the precast concrete segments was set by 2 cm and 5 cm. In addition, all specimens had no reinforcement.
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Behaviour of Steel Fibre Lightweight Wall Panel under One Way In-Plane Action

Behaviour of Steel Fibre Lightweight Wall Panel under One Way In-Plane Action

For each wall size, two (2) samples were prepared to justify findings. A total of five (5) LVDTs were installed onto the sample surface as illustrated in Figure 3 and hooked onto a data acquisition system. The locations chosen based on normal position that maximum displacement would occur in a structural element. The UTM Machine has a load cell capacity of 2000kN, and samples loaded using a loading rate of 0.01kN per second. The experimental test setup and details of fixed-fixed support conditions are shown in Figure 4. Elsewhere, the physical failure such as cracks initiation and identification are analysed by naked eye and measurements made manually.
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Structural Behaviour of Precast Reinforced Concrete Frames on a Non-Engineered Building Subjected to Lateral Loads

Structural Behaviour of Precast Reinforced Concrete Frames on a Non-Engineered Building Subjected to Lateral Loads

In general, useful technology and knowledge for disaster risk reduction and resilience is conceptualized in implementation technology consisting of implementation-oriented technology, process technology, and transferable indigenous knowledge. An innovative seismic resisting system of precast reinforced concrete is implemented on non-engineered building structures as shown in the following sections. In this paper, a research novelty for retrofitting and strengthening techniques is presented with a special concern on precast reinforced concrete frames with and without infill masonry walls of non-engineered building. The innovation includes a damaged specimen which is successively retrofitted with cement mortar, strengthened with wire mesh, and plastered at both sides of each specimen. The most advantage of utilizing this technique is low-cost repair for damaged houses and it produces higher strength and ductility compared to the original. This is mainly oriented to the people who live in an earthquake-prone area having less skill and knowledge in earthquake-resistant building design in an attempt to easily implement this simple repair technology. This is also applicable and suitable for repairing other buildings. This paper presents current research on the structural behaviour of precast RC frames with and without infill masonry walls subjected to lateral loads. In this research, three different specimens comprising open/bare frame, frame with infill concrete block, and frame with infill masonry brick were tested to determine their structural behaviour after achieving ultimate loads. The damaged specimens were repaired with simple retrofitting and strengthening techniques to restore strength, stiffness, and ductility. To compare their structural behaviour with the intact specimens, the entire repaired specimens were re-examined using the same lateral loading arrangement.
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Experimental Study of Flexural and Torsional Behaviour of Beams With bacterial Concrete

Experimental Study of Flexural and Torsional Behaviour of Beams With bacterial Concrete

After 28 days the beams were taken for testing. Beams were placed in the loading frame as shown in Fig 5. The clear span is 1000 mm and load is applied at the middle of the beam which distributes equally at two points to the beam at 165 mm from centre of each side.

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Experimental Study of Flexural Behaviour on Ferrocement Concrete Beam

Experimental Study of Flexural Behaviour on Ferrocement Concrete Beam

4.3 LOAD DEFLECTION BEHAVIOUR Fig.12 shows the load-deflection curves for beams tested. In general, beams with wire mesh layer exhibited greater stiffness than the control specimens. The ratio of the average total deflection near ultimate load for specimens with wire mesh to the corresponding average value of the control specimens was 0.87, 0.74 and 0.73 specimen B-2, specimen B-3and specimen B-4, respectively. The reduction in the deflection was higher for specimens B-2. The control beam failed at the peak load of 80.75 kN in shear with deflection of 9.4mm. The specimen B-2, B-3and B-4have shown similar load-deflection behaviour. The specimen B-2 with have shown maximum load capacity of 94.85 kN and failed in flexure with deflection of 6.8mm. Whereas the specimen B-3with combination of stirrups and welded wire mesh underwent more load- deflection behaviour with deflection of 9.40mm at 110.4 kN. The specimen B-4had failed at the maximum load of 101.45kN with far less deflection of 8.8mm .
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Precast self compacting concrete (PSCC) panel with added coir fiber: an overview

Precast self compacting concrete (PSCC) panel with added coir fiber: an overview

The behaviour of precast panels are often extrapolated from the behaviour of the reinforced concrete solid panels. The studies on previous experimental works have a similar conclusion that is the slenderness ratio will determine type of failure mode. Slenderness ratio is determined by the height over panel thickness ratio, (H/t). It was reported that for small H/t ratios, crushing failures occurred, whereas for higher slenderness ratio, buckling or horizontal centreline failure were common. Crushing failure may occur either at the top or the bottom of the panel [23-24].
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Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Emulative Connections in Precast Concrete Walls

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Emulative Connections in Precast Concrete Walls

In Chapter 6 of this dissertation, the development and calibration of an interfacial model suitable for use in finite element platforms, which can capture the behaviour of grouted connections used in precast concrete construction, were presented. The model adopts a phenomenological bond-slip law to predict the load versus slip response of the grouted bars and considers tensile yielding of the reinforcement. The local bond-slip law used was extracted from a set of experiments carefully designed to eliminate the spurious effects often associated with bond testing. By removing the geometric non-linearities associated with modelling bar lugs and replacing it with interfacial cohesive elements, the model allowed the simulation of grouted connections with superior computational efficiency, while yielding acceptable results. The model was validated using experimental results on grouted connections retrieved from the open literature. Good agreement between the experimental and numerical results was observed, highlighting the accuracy of the model in depicting interfacial stresses of the assembly. The model requires simple calibration and is computationally very efficient. It also accurately simulates the failure behavior of bars embedded in grouted connections.
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