Top PDF Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

The evaluation team made 30 visits to treatment schools, usually one at the beginning of the intervention and one towards the end to observe changes in teacher and pupil behaviour. Schools were visited repeatedly to assess progress. The trips included observations of the initial training of teachers as well as the delivery of the programme in the classroom. Evaluators attended three training sessions as participant observers, noting the process of implementing P4C, the methods of delivery, and also teachers’ responses to the training. The observations of P4C in action were non- intrusive, with the evaluator sitting either inconspicuously at the back of the classroom or more usually as part of a circle but not taking part in the dialogue unless directly addressed. Interviews with teachers and pupils were also conducted during these visits. These interviews were very informal conversations with teachers and pupils who were involved in doing P4C intervention. In each visit a prior meeting was set up between the P4C lead and the teaching staff to discuss the lesson to be taught that day. The evaluation team members also observed the debriefing sessions after lessons in order obtain teachers’ feedback on P4C sessions.
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ScratchMaths: evaluation report and executive summary

ScratchMaths: evaluation report and executive summary

Introduction The intervention Intervention description ScratchMaths is a two-year computing and mathematics curriculum programme designed for pupils aged nine to 11 years, supported by teacher professional development. The ScratchMaths programme aims to address one difficulty many children have in learning mathematics - the need to express mathematical ideas in formal language. The development team’s rationale for the ScratchMaths programme is in part to respond to that challenge, by finding a different language – and set of ideas and approaches - that are more open, more accessible and more learnable. At the same time, they sought to achieve this aim without sacrificing the rigour that makes mathematics work. Their hypothesis is that the language of programming can fulfil this role for pupils, providing that they work on carefully designed tasks and activities, and a teacher is able to support them.
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Dialogic Teaching : Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

Dialogic Teaching : Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

"Do you do the same what you do to the bottom?" to the teacher, and another pupil posed a question to peers in a small group: "No, I ’ m talking about if you ’ ve got 8 friends, would you choose a quarter for yourself or share with eight friends?" In terms of "using relevant strategies to build their vocabulary", this appeared to be largely scaffolded by teachers, such as in School A where the teacher asked "We ’ ve got four eras. Can anyone remember what an era is?" Some pupils were observed articulating and justifying answers, arguments and opinions either in a whole class activity or in small groups or pairs. An example of this comes from School A where towards the end of the Literacy lesson the children were working in pairs cutting out pictures of toys and putting them in age order. Two girls had some discussion about ordering the pictures which demonstrates how their private conversation displays the incomplete sentences and deictic references (This, These) common to spoken English as well as (unelaborated) reasoning and justification.
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Maths counts : evaluation report and executive summary

Maths counts : evaluation report and executive summary

Perceived impact on pupils’ wider outcomes Overall, staff and pupils were very positive about the programme. Pupils particularly liked the one-to- one individual attention and many of the activities. They found the pace of the lessons met their needs and this gave them the confidence to learn maths. The learning environment was supportive and unthreatening. Children felt that if they did not understand a concept they could always ask the LP whereas in a whole-class environment they could not and often felt lost. Teaching staff liked the structured protocol starting with the diagnostics, which helped to identify the individual needs of the child. The lesson activities and the resources are all readily available, which saved time having to think of interesting things to do with the children. All the staff we spoke to commented on how much more confident children had become. The initial anxiety about maths had been slowly eroded. There was evidence of this, not only during the sessions, but also in the classroom. We also observed and heard about changes in pupils’ attitude towards learning maths. They were more willing to have a go, to make mistakes. Even if test score gains are limited, this perceived improvement in confidence is a positive first step towards learning maths and overcoming maths anxiety for the children involved. However, it should be noted that there was no empirical evidence that the programme had an impact on attitudes to maths as measured by a standardised test.
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TextNow Transition Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

TextNow Transition Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

The secondary outcome of interest was ‘reading for pleasure’ or children enjoying and fostering a love of books and reading. It was chosen because it was an intermediate attitudinal change that would lead to end-point outcomes in assessed literacy ability and a core aim of the TextNow programme. Two sub-scales from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) were used as a post- test reading attitudes measure related to reading for pleasure. The two scales were: 1. 'Students Like Reading' Scale and 2. 'Students Motivated to Read' Scale. Appendix I provides a statistical summary of these two scales and the questionnaire items they were derived from. As with the primary outcome, standardised national school literacy assessments were used as a pre-test measure in the secondary outcome models. The resulting observed correlations between this pre-test and the two secondary outcome measures were fairly weak 3 and so the value of the pre-test measure was more limited for the secondary outcomes compared with the primary outcome. The secondary outcome tests were administered during the same session and under the same conditions as the primary outcome test.
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Writing about values : evaluation report and executive summary

Writing about values : evaluation report and executive summary

lead-up to GCSEs where they were preparing to be assessed on these skills. In response to the questions, teachers followed the instructions from the sheet provided by Sussex University and, in most cases, children were satisfied with the responses and began writing. There was just one school where we observed considerable resistance to the task. A middle-ability Year 11 set was very suspicious about what they were being asked to do. One pupil said ‘this is so random and confusing, it’s a conspiracy’. Another questioned whether it was ‘some kind of social experiment’. The ‘secret envelopes’ were deemed very ‘dodgy’ and there was vigorous questioning about who was going to read the work and why. These questions created a ripple effect, encouraging others to grumble and occasionally swear about the writing task. The class teacher, an experienced head of department, remained upbeat and positive throughout all of this questioning and stuck closely to the guidance provided. She emphasised the whole-school nature of the project and did eventually get the students to settle and write.
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Hallé SHINE on Manchester : evaluation report and executive summary.

Hallé SHINE on Manchester : evaluation report and executive summary.

A key challenge for SHINE has been attendance at the projects throughout the evaluation. It is important to SHINE that the maximum number of children are able to benefit from the grant money. Reasons that nominated children did not attend were reported as: other Saturday commitments e.g., music, sport, religious activities, family arrangements; or a lack of engagement with the programme either from parents or from pupils themselves particularly if it is seen as selecting those that are struggling. The selective nature of the programme has also caused an issue when promoting the project in school as some children who would like to attend were unable to do so. Where attendance was good, strategies used were: visits and promotion of the project across all cluster schools through staff and parent meetings. For example, one project had sent weekly newsletters with a section to return the following week; some projects incentivised attendance with prizes and rewards. These strategies were on top of regular communication strategies with parents e.g., texting parents on Thursday/Friday before sessions, following up missing pupils through phone calls. Attendance was generally higher for pupils in the host schools than for other schools.
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Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

4.3 Outcomes Improvements in children ’s attitudes to learning were reported by the majority of volunteers and by evaluators observing the summer events. Most children in the pupil focus groups reported that participating in the Summer Active Reading programme had increased their engagement with, and enjoyment of, reading. One child remarked: ‘Diary of a Wimpy Kid changed my reading, I loved it. I used to hate reading, now I love it. I'm reading “ The Magical Detective ” now ’. He continued to talk in animated detail about the story and how much he liked it, noting:. ‘ I read some of it every day ’ . Some children shared the contents of the packs with other family members — either reading with parents/siblings or playing games together. There was variation across the schools in the extent to which children thought that participating in the Summer Active Reading programme had increased their enjoyment of reading. Some children — particularly those from a school where the pupils were already reasonably confident readers — reported that the programme had encouraged them to read a wider range of books, as well as those aimed at a higher ability. However, this was not the case for all children in the pupil focus groups, with pupils in one school reporting that the intervention had made no difference to their reading.
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Thinking, Doing, Talking Science: Evaluation report and Executive summary

Thinking, Doing, Talking Science: Evaluation report and Executive summary

Teachers spoke about being reinvigorated and inspired by the course. The strategies that they had found especially effective were ‘Practical Prompts for Thinking’, ‘Bright Ideas Time’ and (within that) the ‘Big Question’. The starters were valued as a way to get children into a scientific frame of mind and allowing pupils of different ability levels to take part with all contributions being valued. In many cases, children had been given more freedom to explore and investigate, and had sometimes surprised their teachers: ‘Some particularly challenging questions have been asked, leading to discussions about science I never thought would happen in primary school!’ Several teachers appreciated the ideas for practical work and an ‘emphasis on practical science and talking as opposed to extensive work in books.’
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Evidence for the Frontline: Evaluation report and executive summary. March 2017

Evidence for the Frontline: Evaluation report and executive summary. March 2017

Vignette 1. The impacts of using E4F to improve behaviour in a primary school Question asked: Are there any strategies to improve low level disruptive behaviour in year 2? This question was answered via a short discussion and a series of links to published research papers. The staff member, (a senior leader), read the articles and reassessed and updated the school’s use of various strategies to address low-level disruptive behaviour. The school acted on advice relating to changing elements of the school environment and redesigned classrooms to provide quiet spaces and different areas that pupils could use for individual or group work. The teacher also experimented with using different types of music in the classroom to promote a calm atmosphere which contributed to improvements in children’s behaviour. In addition, pupils were asked to suggest ideas about how behaviour could be improved, and different approaches were tried out on a weekly basis, with the perceived results being discussed in class. Overall, this had a positive effect on the way children responded to the teacher and led to a decrease in disruptive behaviour.
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Affordable online maths tuition : evaluation report and executive summary.

Affordable online maths tuition : evaluation report and executive summary.

Education Endowment Foundation 56 length of time. Staff were divided as to whether 27 sessions over 3 terms was the optimum length of time. Some thought this length of time enabled learning to become embedded, but others felt shorter time-spans and/or greater frequency would be more effective. There is more flexibility with time-span outside of the trial conditions. Afternoon sessions were the best time for schools as core subjects were delivered in the morning. However, one school delivering the intervention on Friday afternoons said the children were tired, and another delivering the intervention after school on Fridays experienced the worst pupil drop-outs. The children complained about what they missed, which tended to be topic classes, with the strongest complaints from a group of pupils who missed PE. It worked well when the other children also did extra maths, as the intervention children did not feel they were missing out. Staff noted that missing other classes was no different from missing classes due to other interventions, although the duration of 3 terms for this
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Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

4.3 Outcomes Improvements in children ’s attitudes to learning were reported by the majority of volunteers and by evaluators observing the summer events. Most children in the pupil focus groups reported that participating in the Summer Active Reading programme had increased their engagement with, and enjoyment of, reading. One child remarked: ‘Diary of a Wimpy Kid changed my reading, I loved it. I used to hate reading, now I love it. I'm reading “The Magical Detective” now’. He continued to talk in animated detail about the story and how much he liked it, noting:. ‘I read some of it every day’. Some children shared the contents of the packs with other family members —either reading with parents/siblings or playing games together. There was variation across the schools in the extent to which children thought that participating in the Summer Active Reading programme had increased their enjoyment of reading. Some children —particularly those from a school where the pupils were already reasonably confident readers —reported that the programme had encouraged them to read a wider range of books, as well as those aimed at a higher ability. However, this was not the case for all children in the pupil focus groups, with pupils in one school reporting that the intervention had made no difference to their reading.
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EVALUATION REPORT. EVALUATION OF UNICEF S EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SYSTEMS Executive Summary

EVALUATION REPORT. EVALUATION OF UNICEF S EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SYSTEMS Executive Summary

UNICEF’s current financial commitments to EP are inadequate to sustain the scope and depth of activities necessary for consistent and systematic EP globally. Delivering “predictable, effective and timely collective humanitarian action”, as envisioned by the Core Commitments for Children in Humanitarian Action (CCCs) appears problematic given the inconsistency of funding allocated to EP activities. COs have been unable to re-programme or allocate financial resources for EP on a consistent or systematic basis because UNICEF has not specifically prioritized EP at the corporate level. UNICEF has not yet built a robust, evidence-based case for donors through effective monitoring and evaluation of EP activities that will result in consistent and adequate short- and long-term funding for EP.
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Mutual Evaluation Report Executive Summary

Mutual Evaluation Report Executive Summary

Preventive Measures—Designated Non-Financial Businesses and Professions 31. The AML/CFT preventive measures have not been extended to DNFBPs. The only requirement that applies to this group is an obligation under the Income Tax Law to report cash transactions to the SAT in excess of Mexican pesos $100 000 (equivalent to approximately US$10 000). This is an obligation imposed on all taxpayers and NPOs. In addition, notaries public are required to report to the SAT every purchase of real estate in Mexico in which they participate regardless of the method of payment. This information is available to the FIU for AML/CFT purposes.
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Paired Reading: Evaluation report and Executive summary

Paired Reading: Evaluation report and Executive summary

In addition to the risk of treatment diffusion, the process evaluation found that there had been some variation amongst participating schools with regards to the set-up, delivery and implementation of the programme. For example, it was recommended to run the pupil training in four sessions. However, schools used a range of approaches to train the pupils involved, from not giving any advance training at all to using the first few sessions to gradually introduce them to the process. Similarly, the length of the sessions varied from school to school, with some able to use the recommended half an hour, while others were forced to condense the lesson into a shorter time period. There was also a varying level of support provided to pupils within the intervention by the teachers involved, based mainly on the reading ability of the pupils. However, these appear to be natural variations between the settings of the schools involved and are unlikely to have affected the dosage of the intervention for the pupils involved.
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Embedding Formative Assessment : evaluation report and executive summary

Embedding Formative Assessment : evaluation report and executive summary

Optimal treatment fidelity was emphasised during the initial training day and in the intervention materials. The resource pack does suggest some possibilities to adapt, mainly the possibility of having same-subject TLC groups and reducing the length for smaller groups to one hour. In addition, the materials emphasise that teachers are free to choose which techniques to implement and experiment with, as long as they attempt to address elements of the five broad formative assessment strategies in their classroom. The materials advise that any whole-school policies on preferred techniques should be deferred until the second year of implementation. After the intervention, SSAT acknowledged that it should have made it more explicit to schools exactly what changes and adaptations were permitted as part of the programme. This will be discussed in more detail in the section on fidelity in the process evaluation chapter. After the intervention, SSAT provided the evaluation team with a further list of minor permitted changes such as choosing between the starter activities, choosing to share learning materials in different ways (for instance in advance of a TLC), making changes to groups in Year 2 due to staff changes and movement to improve group dynamics, adopting minor language changes such as referring to peer observations as ‘peer support’, and using electronic formats of materials and handouts.
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Evaluation Findings: Executive Summary Report to Congress 2009

Evaluation Findings: Executive Summary Report to Congress 2009

The Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program Evaluation Findings 2009 Annual Report to Congress ● Executive Summary ● Page V the effectiveness of systems of care. Caregivers and youth were very satisfied with the services they received through the CMHI, as well as with the outcomes of those services. In addition, caregivers and youth found their service providers to be culturally competent and culturally sensitive. Also of note is that caregivers were more satisfied with services and outcomes when clinicians provided them with information about the treatment their children were receiving, including the amount of experience the provider had with a particular treatment and the research support for the use of that treatment.
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Thinking Maths: Learning Impact Fund Evaluation Report: Evaluation Report and  Executive Summary

Thinking Maths: Learning Impact Fund Evaluation Report: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

The desired alpha was 0.05 and power was 0.8, with a minimum detectable effect size (MDES) of small (Cohen’s d = 0.2). We also needed to take into account the design effect of clustering by including an estimate for the intra-cluster correlations (ICC). This accounts for students in one school being more like each other compared to students in another school (Hutchison & Styles, 2010; Eldridge et al., 2006) when the sample is not a simple random sample, resulting in a net loss of information. In other words, from a statistical perspective, similarities between students in the same class effectively reduce the number of participants in the intervention (Torgerson & Torgerson 2013). The ‘design effect’ was used to estimate the extent to which the sample size should be inflated to accommodate for the homogeneity in the clustered data. In similar studies in Australia, Zopluoglu’s (2012) recommended an Australian ICC coefficient range of 0.2-0.3 (p.264) and the PISA 2012 Technical Report used an Australian ICC for mathematics of 0.28 (OECD 2014, p.439). Taking a conservative approach, we adopted an initial ICC coefficient of ρ = 0.3.
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Teacher Observation : evaluation report and executive summary, November 2017

Teacher Observation : evaluation report and executive summary, November 2017

be that any improvements in teaching practice, and subsequent pupil outcomes, are offset by the effect of reducing other activities. While the quantity of observations seemed to be unrelated to the intervention’s impact, the quality of observations might have had an influence. Previous research suggests the pairing of teacher observation with ongoing, school-based professional development is important for successful implementation (Shaha et al., 2015). The process evaluation found that while some schools adopted the RANDA TOWER observation schedule as part of their ongoing CPD programmes and scheduled a number of additional planning, feedback and reflection meetings to support effective use of the software provided, in others, teachers conducted the observations but made no formal use of the materials beyond that. The project appeared to run most successfully when participants viewed it as peer-driven CPD.
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Executive Summary: Identification, Evaluation, and Management of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Executive Summary: Identification, Evaluation, and Management of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with reported prevalence in the United States of 1 in 59 children (approximately 1.7%). ASD significantly influences the lives of affected children and families because they may need extensive behavioral, educational, health, and other services. Primary care providers play a critical role in identifying, diagnosing, and managing ASD in children and providing support for their families. This document provides a summary of the clinical report “Identification, Evaluation, and Management of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, ” published concurrently in the online version of Pediatrics. In the years since 2007, when the American Academy of Pediatrics published the clinical reports “ Identi fi cation and Diagnosis of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders ” and “ Management of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, ” reported prevalence rates of children with ASD have increased, understanding of potential risk factors has expanded, awareness of co-occurring medical and behavioral conditions and genetic contribution to etiology has improved, and the body of research supporting evidence-based interventions has grown substantially. The updated document discusses evaluation and treatment as a continuum in 1 publication with a table of contents to help the reader identify topic areas within the report. ASD is more commonly diagnosed than in the past, and the significant health, educational, and social needs of individuals with ASD and their families constitute an area of critical need for resources, research, and professional education.
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