Top PDF Reducing teacher workload : research report

Reducing teacher workload : research report

Reducing teacher workload : research report

A good assessment policy is clear on how the assessment outcomes will be used. The policy should outline when it is necessary to record assessment data and when the purposes of assessment do not require data to be collected. The policy should be careful to avoid any unnecessary addition to teacher workload. (p.26) The research group agreed, in the light of this, that there was no need for staff to assess against every national curriculum objective. We wanted to identify the key objectives from each year group for staff to use to assess their pupils. This approach was intended to offer more clarity and focus about what teachers needed to assess. We also agreed that we wanted each KPI to have an expected descriptor and also a ‘depth’ descriptor. The 2014 National Curriculum calls for depth as well as breadth in the primary curriculum but our survey showed that teachers were uncertain about what depth looked like and that this was increasing their workload.
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Reducing teacher workload : research report into shared planning

Reducing teacher workload : research report into shared planning

relevant staff, “you still had to plan lots of lessons”. For SCI/UPS3/Q63, whose department had already carried out much shared planning in the recent past, “the benefits were not as large as for those who current do not”. Lots of teachers felt that the initial burst of activity required had been considerable. Many talked of their expectation that the planning burden may be eased the next year or in 2018/19. MAT/4-6/FG2[Q52], for example, was delighted that their project team had now assembled a bank of resources to cover the new syllabus “so it’s certainly there for later”. HIS/4-6/FG2[Q68] sounded a note of caution, though, adding that when specifications change “everyone’s back to square one”. MAT/1-3/FG4[Q55] felt that the results of future research into effective teaching and learning would eventually need to be accommodated into their own practice, “so I wouldn’t envisage doing these same lessons in three years’ time”. MAT/4-6/FG4[Q6] was of the opinion that teachers would introduce insights from research naturally over time, suggesting that since the material that had been created in the workload projects was of high quality, people would obviously want to use it and consideration of the implications of the latest research would be part of the teacher’s annual revisiting of the work.
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Reducing teachers’ unnecessary workload: the promise of collaborative planning

Reducing teachers’ unnecessary workload: the promise of collaborative planning

• Allocating time – we expected an impact on the quality of planning as initial teacher surveys and interviews reported that the usual 10% allocation of PPA time was often rushed, taken up with other jobs and that teachers lacked the time and space to be as creative as possible and to support children’s engagement in their learning. 1.2.4. How did you investigate the effectiveness of each approach? The research surveys and focus group questionnaires were designed with measuring the impact of each of these approaches in mind. At the end of each planning session, all attendees were required to complete a survey using an online survey platform. The survey was designed to incorporate questions regarding the effectiveness of SLEs as facilitators, the impact of working with other colleagues to plan, and the impact of the discrete and distinct allocation of time to plan with colleagues.
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Reducing teacher workload

Reducing teacher workload

collaborative thematic analytical process – however it did increase cost. Interviewees were required to give up around 30 minutes of their time – though response rate suggests that they were happy to do so. Frank and considered responses may have been encouraged because the interviewers were fellow teachers from a school not directly linked to the interviewee’s. Developing the interview schedule, conducting the interviews and reviewing transcripts all placed considerable demands upon a small group of staff interested in carrying out research.

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Teacher Workload Survey 2019

Teacher Workload Survey 2019

This research brief summarises the findings from the Teacher Workload Survey (TWS) 2019, which is a large-scale nationally representative survey of teachers, middle leaders and senior leaders, conducted over a three-week period in March 2019. The survey helps act as a national ‘barometer’ for teachers’, middle leaders’ and senior leaders’ working conditions and forms a key part of the Department for Education’s (DfE) commitment to improving the evidence base on what drives unnecessary teacher workload and what works to reduce it. This brief is accompanied by a full report and technical report.
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Teacher Workload Survey 2019

Teacher Workload Survey 2019

understanding of the questions and the consistency with which different questions were asked (a full explanation of these changes is provided in the technical report). Some of these changes were also designed to reduce the time needed to complete the survey, and could have influenced the responses respondents gave. The TWS 2019 research team also made efforts to minimise response bias, including not using the DfE logo in the survey and sharing a briefing document about the survey with stakeholders, for use in helping to raise awareness of the survey amongst members. This may have affected respondents’ survey experience. Some caution is therefore advised when interpreting the comparisons between the 2016 and 2019 surveys, due to small wording changes to the 2019 survey and efforts to minimise response bias, both of which may partly account for some differences between the two surveys.
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Eliminating unnecessary workload around planning and teaching resources. Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group

Eliminating unnecessary workload around planning and teaching resources. Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group

As the workload challenge showed, all parts of the education system have a role to play in reducing the unnecessary tasks that take teachers and school leaders away from their core task: improving outcomes for children. There is no single reason behind excessive workload. Government must always introduce policies with thought and planning. The accountability system must encourage good practice rather than stimulate fads. School leaders must have the confidence to reject decisions that increase burdens for their staff for little dividend. Teachers themselves must be more active in using evidence to
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Eliminating unnecessary workload associated with data management. Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group

Eliminating unnecessary workload associated with data management. Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group

As the workload challenge showed, all parts of the education system have a role to play in reducing the unnecessary tasks that take teachers and school leaders away from their core task: improving outcomes for children. There is no single reason behind excessive workload. Government must always introduce policies with thought and planning. The accountability system must encourage good practice rather than stimulate fads. School leaders must have the confidence to reject decisions that increase burdens for their staff for little dividend. Teachers themselves must be more active in using evidence to
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International teacher recruitment: understanding the attitudes and experiences of school leaders and teachers  Research Report

International teacher recruitment: understanding the attitudes and experiences of school leaders and teachers Research Report

Some European nationals were reported to lack a depth of pedagogic expertise and experience of assessment tracking, and had difficulty in coping with the demands of the workload when compared with UK recruits. School leaders reported that although there was an availability of Spanish and Portuguese teachers, they were considered to be of poor quality. Some commented that Spanish and Portuguese teachers had a tendency towards more teacher-led, didactic teaching styles and struggled to cope when there were behavioural issues and needed a lot of reassurance. In particular, it was reported that recruits from Spain were unfamiliar with the UK school system in terms of planning, marking and ensuring that progress was made by all members of the class, and that the Spanish teachers of maths and science that the school had recruited had been an ‘absolute disaster’ (S27Y). Another school leader (S26Y), however, reported mixed perceptions of Spanish teachers stating that whilst they were, overall, less successful that other international recruits, they had also recruited 2-3 outstanding maths teachers from Spain. One school leader (S16Y) reported that teachers from Spain tend to stay a little longer than other international recruits – normally 3-4 years, and that they found it ideal employing a Spanish teacher to teach Spanish.
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Collaborate, Plan and Renew : teacher workload : reducing workload and increasing confidence through curriculum planning

Collaborate, Plan and Renew : teacher workload : reducing workload and increasing confidence through curriculum planning

field research carried out by the project’s field researcher. This involved ongoing notes of meetings and workshops. The field researcher also provided formative reflection and evaluation as the project progressed. The project lead school’s deputy headteacher also kept an ongoing log, which captured and shared summaries of each stage of the project. This person fulfilled the role of helping maintain momentum of the project: setting out agreed actions and next steps; facilitating communications within and between schools; and chasing up on activity and deadlines

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Reducing teacher workload through ‘real-time’ personalised feedback

Reducing teacher workload through ‘real-time’ personalised feedback

Within the research data, there were variations in formal assessment practice across the participant schools, but termly and end - of - year formal assessments in Literacy and Maths were common to all. These would take the format, generally, of ‘levelling’ the student in various ways, such as, for example, using target trackers where teachers “go along ticking off the objectives (achieved/not achieved).” In some schools, these were also done at the end of every half term giving, typically, levels/bands, such as with the labels ‘secure’ or ‘developing’. Universally, the “top level analysis” of this emergent data was undertaken by the school leaders. A common format would be for the data to be put into tables to check individual student progress, but also to make comparisons between groups. The teachers were then usually given statistical information on how particular groups were progressing, but sometimes it could be as generic and vague as “boys not doing very well”.
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Reducing teacher workload : the WOWS research project

Reducing teacher workload : the WOWS research project

• Agreed that we should trust professional judgment. The Pencil Targets were very effective – children found them motivating, they helped children remember their targets and to self assess. However, keeping track of the targets given to each child, the ones met and then the new targets was an onerous task. No teacher would give a target for a child to use question marks and exclamation marks if they weren’t using capital letters, finger spaces and full stops! A child would never be asked to learn the six times table if they didn’t know the two times table. It was agreed that we would stop writing a next steps comment because as a teacher you would teach the child appropriately at the next opportunity.
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Reducing teacher workload

Reducing teacher workload

Staff at Southwark TSA report that one of the greatest challenges in the project was for teachers to find time in the day to conference with pupils. This was particularly difficult for those teachers without any support staff. Some teachers used the ‘soft-start’ from 8:45 – 9:05 as children arrived for the day, but before lessons. Some used a slot at the end of the day during which a teaching assistant could read a story to some children whilst the teacher conferenced with others.

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Reducing teacher workload

Reducing teacher workload

‘Visible Learning into Action’ was a whole school strategy that started with Hattie’s ‘Visible Learning impact cycle’ (2016) where 15 teachers jointly reviewed the place of feedback within their teaching and impact on pupil learning. Pupils’ views were sought through interviews about marking and feedback. Teachers in each year group then designed a new feedback practice based on this evidence. FS/Year 1 increased the use of verbal feedback and minimised use of stamps and (coloured) pens. Years 2-4 used ticks, coloured pens and stamps to replace extensive written feedback; pupils were encouraged to self-edit and minimal teacher comments were made on ‘next steps’ and where work was exceptionally well done or wrong. Year 5-6 pupils used self-assessment and peer marking. Whole class generic feedback was given to help pupils edit their work. Teachers kept research journals and shared reflections of progress on marking at the start of each staff meeting. The impact differed across year groups; teachers of Years 5-6 noticed the most significant drop in marking workload and those FS/Y1 the least. Teacher reflections included:
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Research into teacher effectiveness : a model of teacher effectiveness

Research into teacher effectiveness : a model of teacher effectiveness

The classroom climate pilot work we undertook with groups of teachers and pupils enabled us to test and refine a 27-question (three questions per dimension) Primary School Classroom Climate Questionnaire (PSCCQ), and a 57-question (6 to 7 questions per dimension) Secondary School Classroom Climate Questionnaire (SSCCQ). Both questionnaires assessed the nine climate dimensions of Clarity, Order, Standards, Fairness, Participation, Support, Safety, Interest, and Environment. The secondary questionnaire, unlike the primary, asked students to assess current and desired future classroom climate. Our main phase of classroom climate research, based on a broad sample of primary and secondary school classes, demonstrated the reliability of both climate questionnaires. Furthermore, the associations between the nine climate dimensions reveal somewhat similar latent structures in both the PSCCQ and the SSCCQ. An example of a question drawn from the Order dimension, for both questionnaires, is shown below, and the questions from each relating to Fairness appear at the end of Appendix IV.
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Machine learning algorithms for systematic review: reducing workload in a preclinical review of animal studies and reducing human screening error

Machine learning algorithms for systematic review: reducing workload in a preclinical review of animal studies and reducing human screening error

The low precision estimate achieved by this classifier may mean it is less useful in projects where the inclu- sion prevalence is smaller. Where the inclusion preva- lence is 5%, we calculated the precision to be 30% (Additional file 2: Figure S1, Additional file 3: Data S1). Therefore, the machine learning algorithms tested here may not be useful where the research question is a lot more specific or where systematic searches that are not very specific. One approach in cases where prevalence is low may be to adjust for a class imbalance in the training sets [42]. By manually constructing datasets and training algorithms on training sets with different ‘prevalence’ or different class imbalance, the variance in the predictions the model makes can potentially be reduced (see [43]). A complementary approach may be a refinement of the search strategy to increase the prevalence of inclusion.
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ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH CENTRE. Normal Workload Standards (NWS) General Purpose of the Normal Workload Standard

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH CENTRE. Normal Workload Standards (NWS) General Purpose of the Normal Workload Standard

i. Teaching activities that are not scheduled by the Registrar’s Office at regular times or in a specific location constitute unscheduled teaching, including (but not limited to) supervision of graduate theses, supervision of major research paper (MRP), supervisory committee memberships, and directed study course instruction (graduate).

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Does Academics’ Workload Affect Research Performance?

Does Academics’ Workload Affect Research Performance?

advancement and strive to perform despite being burdened with administrative tasks. This is especially critical since career advancement rubric prioritize research performance over teaching. This research validates the contention that workload (input) should translate into research performance (output). This indicates that academics who have higher workload publish more and has more research grants. It also substantiates previous studies by Kenny (2017); Teater and Mendoza (2018). However, this finding should be treated with caution. It is believed that the workload-linkage relationship very similar to Yerkes–Dodson law on a stress-performance relationship. Reasonable workload (as in stress) is imperative to boost performance but excessive amount of workload would impair performance and has other undesirable side effects such as burnout and depression. As evident from the descriptive mean, the mean of workload per semester across all academic ranks was 51.7 hours per semester which was considered slightly above 40 hours. These findings are important for several reasons. First, it provides additional support for the increasing workload among academics. Secondly, it validates the current workload calculation of workload used by the university. It indicates that the workload weightage calculation is a valid measure of academic activities. Thirdly, this study lays a foundation for subsequent studies to validate the performance appraisal rubrics. This study enables the university management to ascertain objectives measure of individual performance and how it could be linked with the organizational KPIs particularly in the context of research performance. However, this study is not without limitations. Perhaps the most important limitation is the type of secondary data used
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Reducing workload fluctuations through causal forecasting : a case study in the plaster room of Sint Maartenskliniek

Reducing workload fluctuations through causal forecasting : a case study in the plaster room of Sint Maartenskliniek

The logistic department of the Sint Maartenskliniek is currently implementing expected demand in the radiology department. They use causal forecasting, based on historical data and the production of the orthopedic department. This model is based on the research of Kortbeek, Braaksma, Smeenk, Bakker, & Boucherie (2015) and Vanberkel et al. (2011). Both researchers use a model that projects the workload for downstream departments and is based on probability distributions with historical data as input. T Vanberkel et al. (2011) describe the analytical approach and application at the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in the Netherlands. Kortbeek et al. (2015) build upon the model of Vanberkel et al. (2011) and is applied in the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Both models were created to determine the number of occupied beds in the wards as a function of the Master Surgery Schedule (MSS) and emergency patients. The walk-in demand in the plaster room is not a function of the MSS but rather of the outpatient clinic schedule of the orthopedic physicians. Most patients that request walk-in treatment are referred by these physicians after consultation during their outpatient clinic sessions. Therefore, the outpatient clinic session schedule is used as input rather than the MSS.
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The Influence of Motivation, Leadership and Perceived Workload as Intervening on Teacher Commitment

The Influence of Motivation, Leadership and Perceived Workload as Intervening on Teacher Commitment

Workload is defined as all activities that result in a person spending his time doing a job that is in accordance with his professional duties, responsibilities and interests in work. For teachers the workload does not only exist in school, but teachers also have to spend extra time after working hours, to be more effective and productive in their work as teachers. (Johari, Tan, & Tjik, 2016). In this study, workload that is being tested is perceived workload, which is a feeling that something needs effort to be expended or done. Individual perception that the tasks / jobs given to them from the workplace are above normal or stressful. (Cömert & Dönmez, 2019).
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