Top PDF Activity Based Learning System in Higher Education: A Student Centred Approach

Activity Based Learning System in Higher Education: A Student Centred Approach

Activity Based Learning System in Higher Education: A Student Centred Approach

A teacher is considered to be the academic leader and facilitator of students. They recognizes their potential and helps them in right direction at right time. A constructivist approach is oriented on construction of knowledge putting students in practical situations under the guidance and tutelage of teachers. It seems to be based on the belief that learners construct their own knowledge through interaction, and the assumption that “knowledge is physically constructed by learners who are involved actively in learning process” (Gagnon & Colley, 2001: p. 1) appears to be substantiating it. Knowledge is constructed in social environments where interaction is considered to be a fundamental factor for effective teaching learning process (Sims, Dobbs, & Hand, 2001). Under such circumstances the role of a teacher cannot be neglected rather it becomes more significant in terms of coaching students to selecting appropriate activities for learning.
Show more

6 Read more

EVALUATING A STUDENT CENTRED APPROACH TO TEACHING AND LEARNING ON A POST GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL MODULE

EVALUATING A STUDENT CENTRED APPROACH TO TEACHING AND LEARNING ON A POST GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL MODULE

Although the tutors need to be utilitarian not just in their choice of feedback tool but also in the SCL learning strategy, their role in improving student performance commands a more differentiated approach. The data suggests that students who engage with the formative process do better at summative assessment, so why do some students not participate? Of the PDHRM students without previous higher education experience who failed the summative examination, only one had undertaken the weekly exam activities and mock exam. Further investigation is needed in to the barriers preventing engagement and thus learning amongst this group. Additionally, Frambach et al (2012) suggested that with exposure and cultural sensitivity from tutors, techniques embodied in SCL can be accepted and employed successfully by students from non-Western cultures, so is it a matter will be worthwhile to survey the perspectives of the international students in more detail on the methods employed in this module and on others on their course.
Show more

12 Read more

STUDENT CENTERED LEARNING STRATEGIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

STUDENT CENTERED LEARNING STRATEGIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

If learning, rather than instruction, is at the heart of the enterprise of higher education, then the weight of empirical findings decidedly supports the use of active, student-centred approaches over passive, teacher centred strategies. Teachers who believe their job is to cover their course systematically by transmitting information to students are more likely to encourage surface learning approaches among their students, where retention is temporary, generalisation of knowledge poor and learning how to learn is minimal. On the other hand, teachers who encourage student involvement in the learning process and focus on the quality of learning outcomes are more likely to encourage cognitively deeper and richer learning experiences for their students. In short, by focussing on instruction rather than learning, universities have confused means with ends, and created institutions that foster and promote the least effective methods for student learning.
Show more

10 Read more

Web-Based Teaching And Learning Approach (WBTLA) Usability In Institutions Of Higher Learning In Malaysia

Web-Based Teaching And Learning Approach (WBTLA) Usability In Institutions Of Higher Learning In Malaysia

Becker (2000)and Cuban (2001) found that a large number of faculty members did not effectively use information and communication technologies in teaching and learning. In order to facilitate teaching and learning, a number of researchers (Kukusska-Hulme& Shield, 2004; Nokelainen, 2006) suggest that developers need to designWBTLAwith suitable usability to meet the learners’ and teachers’ needs. Hadjerrouit (2010) suggested a model of evaluating usability of web-based teaching and learning resources which constitutes three important dimensions, namely pedagogical usability, technological usability and contextual usability. From the pedagogical usability viewpoint, current WBTLA lacks a number of features that would make it more flexible, interactive, motivating, and collaborative. Hence in dealing with pedagogical issues, WBLE must be extended to captureelements pertinent to learning. WBTLA with advanced online multimedia features is difficult to design, and therefore current systems are still limited in their pedagogical usability. Martinidale, Cates, and Qian (2005) pointed out that the current WBLE is substantially difficult to create especially that which tries to accommodate the demands of constructivist learning. Likewise, Liu and LaMont Johnson (2005) found a lack of fit between existing WBLEandwhat teachers, educators, and learners need, as well as a lack of connection between WBLEdesignand educational standards.
Show more

12 Read more

How Is the Student’s Personality in Implementing Science and Technology for
Entrepreneurship Learning with a Production Based
Learning Approach in Higher Education?

How Is the Student’s Personality in Implementing Science and Technology for Entrepreneurship Learning with a Production Based Learning Approach in Higher Education?

Production-based learning model is a process of expertise or educational skills that are designed and implemented a standard based on the working procedures and the actual (real job) to produce goods or services that in line with the demands of markets or customers (Saputro et al., 2018; Suryadi and Supriatna, 2018). Production-based learning emphasizes learning models, where students can undertake the production of goods or services that meet the standards of the world business/industrial world and society. Production-based learning is the learning models that models give learners the opportunity to develop and review their skills and ability to think and work together. In the learning process with this production-based learning model, learners are required to be able to be as active as raises important questions relating to the products to be made. Production-based learning models consist of syntaxes or steps in the learning process, roommates. According to Ganefri and Hidayat (2015), production-based learning models, syntax or sequence of steps consists of nine steps. They are analyzing of curriculum and characteristics of learners, identifying and analyzing products, making the important question of the product, mapping the question, analyzing the needs of the equipment and materials into the products to be made, making the schedule of manufacture of the product, process of making the product and evaluating regularly and making the business plan.
Show more

7 Read more

Teaching bioinformatics: A student-centred and problem based approach

Teaching bioinformatics: A student-centred and problem based approach

The third kind of bridge is the hands-on use of major online bioinformatics services, including national and international resources such as ANGIS BioManager (Australia), NCBI (USA), EMBL (Europe), ExPASy (Sweden), and S-Star.org (Multinational) (see Useful Links below). There are hundreds of programs available through BioManager. NCBI was one of the first online bioinformatics resources and is still a world leader. EMBL is a major European bioinformatics resource. ExPASy is the protein sequence analysis expert system, which contains a large number of modular programs. S-Star.org is a pioneering international bioinformatics education initiative, which involves institutions from around the world (Ping et al. 2002). Students are required to use these platforms in their own time, after receiving teacher-guided help in class during tutorial sessions.
Show more

11 Read more

Using Socrative to enhance in class student engagement and collaboration

Using Socrative to enhance in class student engagement and collaboration

Learning and teaching experiment was designed to incorporate SRS-Student Response System to measure and assess student engagement in higher education for level 5 engineering students. The SRS system was based on getting an immediate student feedback to short quizzes lasting 10 to 15 minutes using Socrative software. The structure of the questions was a blend of true/false, multiple choice and short answer questions. The experiment was conducted through semester 2 of yearlong engineering module. The outcome of the experiment was analyzed quantitatively based on student performance and qualitatively through student questionnaire. The results indicate that using student paced assessments method using Socrative enhanced student’s performance. The results showed that 53% of the students improved their performance while 23% neither improved nor underperformed. Qualitative data showed students felt improvement in their learning experience. Overall results indicate positive impact using this technology in teaching and learning for engineering modules in higher education
Show more

8 Read more

From High School to Higher Degrees: Teaching and Supporting Learning for Students entering Postgraduate Professional Study without Undergraduate Degrees

From High School to Higher Degrees: Teaching and Supporting Learning for Students entering Postgraduate Professional Study without Undergraduate Degrees

Although the research focused on a specific non-graduate group, most modules on the professional HR courses at the university were delivered to a homogeneous cohort of graduates and non-graduates, of domestic and international origin, studying full-time and part-time, native and non-native English speaking, with extensive field experience and none. Therefore the challenge for lecturers was to initiate and develop pedagogical interventions that would maximise student engagement and thus facilitate learning and achievement. For the first module on the course, Leading, Managing and Developing People (LMDP) a student centred approach to teaching and learning was adopted as a means to achieving these two goals. Tutors relied on particular techniques including case study analysis and discussion. Voluntary formative assessments (based on previous exam questions) were offered weekly with feedback provided by email, and a voluntary mock exam (undertaken in students’ own time at module end with audio feedback by email) was devised with the intention of using assessment for learning rather than assessment of learning (Hounsell et al. 2008).
Show more

21 Read more

Teachers’ conceptions of learning and teaching in student-centred medical curricula: the impact of context and personal characteristics

Teachers’ conceptions of learning and teaching in student-centred medical curricula: the impact of context and personal characteristics

All coding was done using qualitative data analysis soft- ware (Atlas-ti, version 7.5.1). We analyzed the data using a template analysis method [29–31]. This method stimu- lates researchers to be explicit beforehand about their assumptions. A template is a list of codes which reflect themes and relationships between themes as conceived by the researcher, building on previous research. Our initial template was based on the information we col- lected in general higher education, about the influence of contextual and personal characteristics on teaching behaviour. This initial template was the starting point for our analysis and the template was modified by itera- tively adding, deleting and reorganising themes as cod- ing continued after every interview. The first two interviews were coded in close collaboration by two re- searchers (JCGJ, VUmc Amsterdam en SJvL, Maastricht) to achieve consensus on the template, the level of detail and modifications in the template. Next the third and fourth interview were coded individually by these two researchers and discussed afterwards. This resulted in consensus about the codes used. Afterwards JCGJ coded the remaining interviews and modified the template in the subsequent iterative proces of data collection and analysis. After the coding, Atlas-ti provided a sorting of quotations, which were summarized in Excel sheets. The full research team discussed the final template and the summary of quotations.
Show more

11 Read more

SEMANTIC BASED LEARNING APPROACH IN EDUCATION SYSTEM

SEMANTIC BASED LEARNING APPROACH IN EDUCATION SYSTEM

Web 3.0 is the transformation of information on web from ―only display information‖ to ―meaningful information‖[4], by tagging information with descriptors like ―mailing address.‖ Further, it allows users to find relationships between tagged information using inference rules and data organizational tools called ―ontologies‖ that provide logic and structure to the information embedded in web pages. As a result, machines can do a lot of the information grunt work currently required of humans. When it comes to a web search, for example, the semantic web makes a reasonable pass at collating, synthesizing, and cross-referencing the results for you. It does this by employing software agents that can locate and combine information from many sources to build meaningful information collages. Simply tell your agent the focus of your interest—whether a person, subject, activity, question, or whatever—and set it to roam the web, finding and distilling information and exchanging information with other agents. Ultimately, the goal of Web 3.0 is, in a phrase, data integration. Because the semantic web understands the concept of a mailing address, it can relate my address to other web-defined concepts like walking distance, postal rates, climate, or driving directions to the nearest airport. Thus, if I ask my agent to help me prepare for a trip to the Mohali, it can make assumptions about the clothes and flights I need, and so on. Because I live in Delhi, it might tell me to order clothing online soon because it takes longer to get here. It may even tell me the names of friends (who have made themselves semantically available) who have visited the Mohali.
Show more

5 Read more

Learning Objects Innovation in Higher Education: Students’ Perspective

Learning Objects Innovation in Higher Education: Students’ Perspective

Abstract:- The development of Learning Object (LO) for online learning in higher education that has been done need to be optimized on its utilization. Based on the literature review, analyzing the needs on students’ perspective as the end-users of the online course is necessary. The objective of this research is to obtain the innovation needs in improving the LO from students’ perspective. The research was using the Kavita Gupta (2007) needs analysis model through knowledge and skill assessment approach. The phases include: initial data collecting, planning, analyzing the needs, analyzing data, and reporting. The data were collected by using questionnaire, Focus Group Discussion (FGD), product testing, and LO observation. The subject of the research was students that had taken the Teaching and Learning Theory course. Meanwhile the research object was the course-site of the course in www.fip.web-bali.net. The result of this research found that:
Show more

5 Read more

Improving Higher Education Student Learning through a Table of Learning

Improving Higher Education Student Learning through a Table of Learning

La Trobe has been using Moodle as the LMS for teaching and learning since 2011. Moodle (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment) is an Open Source Course Management System (CMS), also known as a Learning Man- agement System (LMS) (http://moodle.org). It has become very popular among educators around the world as a tool for creating online dynamic web sites for their students. Moodle aims to give educators good tools to manage and promote learning, but there are many ways to use it. For instances, it has features that allow it to scale to very large deployments and hundreds of thousands of students, yet it can also be used for a primary school or an education hobbyist. Many institutions use it as their platform to conduct fully online courses, while some use it simply to augment face-to-face courses (known as blended learning). Many users love to use the activity modules (such as forums, databases and wikis) to build richly collaborative com- munities of learning around their subject matter (in the social constructionist tradition), while others prefer to use Moodle as a way to deliver content to students and assess learning using assignments or quizzes.
Show more

8 Read more

Indigenizing Student-Centred Learning:  A Western Approach In An Indigenous Educational Institution

Indigenizing Student-Centred Learning: A Western Approach In An Indigenous Educational Institution

The Māori people are the indigenous people of New Zealand, the tangata whenua (people of the land). They therefore have their own deeply ingrained Māori values, principles and tradition which are practiced in the teaching and learning context. According to Bishop (2003) “current educational policies and practices, in Aotearoa/New Zealand, as in most western countries, were developed and continue to be developed within a pattern of power imbalances which favours cultural deficit explanations” (Bishop, 2003, p. 221). For the Māori people, the imposition of the dominant Western theories and worldviews which are inconsistent with the Māori epistemologies and pedagogy are found to be ineffective in akoranga Māori (Māori learning). Bishop (2003) and Smith (1999) promote the reaffirmation and empowerment of indigenous Māori cultural aspirations through the Kaupapa Māori theory and practice which are proven to be beneficial for Māori as a way of addressing the imbalances in the classroom. “In Kaupapa Māori contexts, the interrelationships and interaction patterns draw on Māori cultural aspirations and sense-making processes (ways of knowing) rather than on those imposed by another culture” (Bishop, 2003, p. 223). Mātauranga Māori (Māori pedagogy), also based from traditional Māori concepts and built upon Kaupapa Māori principles, presents teaching and learning approaches which are considered to be effective in engaging Māori learners. A pedagogical practice that acknowledges and respects the distinction of the indigenous customs and traditions is crucial to the success of the learners.
Show more

6 Read more

Outcome based quality Management in Higher Education: an approach to meeting Societal needs

Outcome based quality Management in Higher Education: an approach to meeting Societal needs

The ultimate goal of HE is to foster the graduate’s workplace readiness and employability. OBE has, therefore, been acknowledged to be effective in this goal achievement. Concurring with Ball (2009), Caspersen, Lange, Prøitz, Solbrekke, and Stensaker (2011) emphasize that “[q]uality can be said to have been a key concept in higher education policies since the latter part of the 1980s, and it is often associated with a shift from an input-oriented focus in higher education, to more output and results-orientations among policy-makers” (Cited in Caspersenet al., 2011, p. 1). Kazin and Payne (2009, p. 31) conclude “[s]tudent outcomes are integral to institutional quality, and that quality is fundamental to fulfilling the missions of the institutions that governing boards oversee” and that “[w]ithout assessing student learning outcomes, there is no reliable way to measure and demonstrate an institution’s educational quality”. This highlights the significance of the application of an outcome-based approach to fostering HE students’ knowledge and skills to meet societal needs. This paper focuses on the application of an outcome- based approach to QM in HE at the course 1 level.
Show more

5 Read more

Analysing Educational Policy: The Twente Educational Model

Analysing Educational Policy: The Twente Educational Model

In this paragraph, I will analyse the dropout-rates of first-year students for the four different faculties. The dropout-dataset I use is provided by the UT. In this analysis, I have divided the respondents into six cohorts ranging from 2010 to 2016. This allows me to divide the sample into two groups: first-year students who studied before or after the implementation of TEM. In cohort 2013 the TEM was implemented, this is illustrated in table 17 by a horizontal line. In 2013 also the BSA instrument was implemented by the UT, which implied that during the first academic year at least 45 EC must be completed to continue the study programme. We therefore expect a higher dropout in the year of 2013. When comparing dropout rates before and after TEM this might lead to biased results, the year of 2013 is therefore not used in the final analysis.
Show more

73 Read more

Learning spaces in the countryside: university students and the Harper assemblage

Learning spaces in the countryside: university students and the Harper assemblage

In examining areas for the future expansion of geographies of education more broadly, Mills and Kraftl (2016, 25) suggest that ‘materiality, affect, embodiment, representation and built form – should surely have an important place’. Similarly, Bauer (2015) contends that there is a need for more research informed by affect and socio-materiality, and taking inspiration from actor-network theory, calls for the consideration of networks of humans and non-humans in education. In doing so, she suggests that such an approach can ‘bring to the surface the social- and-material enactments that are co-producing knowledge’ (Bauer 2015: 624). Indeed, Kullman (2015) demonstrates the value of analysing what she calls ‘pedagogical assemblages’ in the context of children’s traffic education, and posits that the approach can have wider applicability and potential outside childhood research, for ‘learning is the outcome of assembling’ (Kullman 2015, 263), whatever the context.
Show more

21 Read more

Student projects empowering mobile learning in higher education

Student projects empowering mobile learning in higher education

The preliminary results of applying this new process to final year projects were satisfactory with respect to both student outcomes and community creation. Regarding the former, the students acquired mobile development and usability competencies and demonstrated a high level of engagement (because the results of their work would be useful to their fellow students). Concerning the latter, it has already enabled some of the new mobile tools to be incorporated into the Virtual Campus. Furthermore, the use of open source code in the described approach allows new apps to be developed by building on the results obtained in earlier projects, as well as adding functionalities to mobile apps that have already been developed.
Show more

16 Read more

A Framework for Mobile Learning for the enhancement of Learning in Higher Education

A Framework for Mobile Learning for the enhancement of Learning in Higher Education

As mobile learning becomes increasingly pervasive, many higher education institutions have initiated a number of mobile learning initiatives to support their traditional learning modes. This study proposes a framework for mobile learning for enhancing learning in higher education. This framework for mobile learning is based on research conducted on the course titled “Internet Technology,” taught to second year students in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the University of Djibouti. While the entire gamut of mobile technologies and academic applications needs to be considered, special emphasis and focus is provided to Short Message Services (SMS) and popular social network sites such as Facebook, which is widely used for recreation. This paper highlights how mobile learning using SMS and Facebook can be designed to enhance student learning and help achieve learning outcomes.
Show more

9 Read more

USING ACTIVITY APPROACH IN HIGHER EDUCATION

USING ACTIVITY APPROACH IN HIGHER EDUCATION

На основе анализа указанных структур делается вывод о том, что гуманитарная подготовка не только способна, но также должна выполнять и профессиональные функции в п[r]

15 Read more

Higher Education Journals:their characteristics and contribution

Higher Education Journals:their characteristics and contribution

Interestingly, the majority of the 86 journals identified in Table 1 (55, or 64%) focus on a specific topic, theme or sector. Forty-nine of these journals focus on a topic or theme, while the remaining six focus on a particular sector. Thus, in the former case, there are one or more journals focusing on each of the following themes - academic or faculty development, academic ethics, assessment, computing, continuing higher education, diversity, doctoral studies, educational technology, engagement, evaluation, the first-year experience, innovation, institutional research, international students, the internet, law, learning, management, marketing, method, outreach, pedagogy, planning, policy, practice, problem-based learning, public scholarship, publishing, quality, research, service learning, skills, student affairs, student development, student retention, success, sustainability, teaching, theory, women, work-based learning – as they impact upon higher education. In the latter case, we find journals focused on community colleges (two of them) and Catholic, Christian, Jesuit and Hispanic higher education.
Show more

22 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...