Top PDF Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

look at the priority given to schools facing significant challenges. Implementation 5.11 Supported schools are allocated a specially trained ‘Creative Agent’ who work with the school in order to develop a project which will address the school’s identified priorities. The first term of the school year (autumn term) is spent planning the programme for the spring term. At this planning stage, activities and Creative Practitioners are identified and a Planning Form submitted to Creative Learning Through the Arts programme staff for approval. The classroom creative learning activity between the pupils, teachers and ‘Creative Practitioner’ takes place in the spring term and internal reflective evaluation of the activity is undertaken in the summer term. Schools are supported for two years - with the second year structure the same as the first and with priorities and activities informed by year- one learning.
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Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

3.51 Pupils enjoyed the way in which photography became a method of getting them out of the classroom and closer to real-world learning. The key idea that they took away from the project was a deceptively simple, albeit powerful, one: if you are learning about rivers, go to a river, rather than a classroom. The power of the framed photographs was twofold: they were artistic works in their own right, but they also brought that authentic moment back to the school and the children related to that very positively. As one girl commented: "We could have learned the same geography knowledge sitting here at a desk. But one year later, I don't think I would remember as much as I do, because it was just better. We were outside, it was fun, we were sharing the whole thing as a group — it just made the whole thing more memorable."
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Creating Creative Learning Environments by Creative Partnerships Programme—Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics  Programme in Pécs

Creating Creative Learning Environments by Creative Partnerships Programme—Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics Programme in Pécs

4 The evaluation of the first pilot programme largely followed the internal evaluation mechanism of the original Creative Partnerships pro- gramme. This meant that the creative professionals prepared a so-called initial planning document which could then be compared to the data and information of the completion form they filledat the end of the programme. In addition a qualitative assessment took place in the final stage of the programme at each of the sites, which consisted of observation of sessions, semi-structured interviews with the school heads, structured interviews with the teachers and creative practitioners, and focus group sessions with the students (The qualitative study was car- ried out jointly by Creativity Culture and Education of England and T-Tudok). To supplement this internal practice and relying on the stu- dent questionnaire developed for the Complex Art Education component of the day school programme of the Hungarian Institute for Educa- tional Research and Development, at the end of the programme T-Tudok sent the participating students an online questionnaire. In addition to the demographic data, the questionnaire collected the students’ observations about the programme and the school on the one hand, and at- tempted to explore the students’ self image, social competence, empathy and learning motivation by means of a test consisting of 50 items.
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A community arts programme for older people : an evaluation

A community arts programme for older people : an evaluation

This community arts programme was developed specifically for people over the age of fifty. Unlike many older people’s projects, the programme sought to engage a broad range of older people including those who are newly retired, individuals who have lost partners due to bereavement, people living in rural locations, those recovering from health problems including mental health issues, as well as more vulnerable and ‘elderly’ individuals. This programme aimed to promote a positive view of ageing, to support independence and wellbeing and to challenge negative social perceptions of older people. Central to this
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A community arts programme for older people: an
evaluation

A community arts programme for older people: an evaluation

This community arts programme was developed specifically for people over the age of fifty. Unlike many older people’s projects, the programme sought to engage a broad range of older people including those who are newly retired, individuals who have lost partners due to bereavement, people living in rural locations, those recovering from health problems including mental health issues, as well as more vulnerable and ‘elderly’ individuals. This programme aimed to promote a positive view of ageing, to support independence and wellbeing and to challenge negative social perceptions of older people. Central to this
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Experiencing the Arts Fund Go and See. Creative learning through the arts. February 2020

Experiencing the Arts Fund Go and See. Creative learning through the arts. February 2020

We believe that our children and young people should have the chance to be inspired and excited by the best that the arts in Wales has to offer. So, as part of the Welsh Government/Arts Council of Wales joint-funded Creative learning through the arts programme, the Experiencing the Arts Fund aims to provide children and young people with opportunities to engage with arts and cultural activities as a routine part of their wider learning experience.

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Promoting young people’s mental health and well being through participation in the arts: A mixed methods service evaluation of the Zinc Arts ArtZone programme

Promoting young people’s mental health and well being through participation in the arts: A mixed methods service evaluation of the Zinc Arts ArtZone programme

participatory arts programme. The key now is to ensure sustainability of the programme in order for the work to continue and for longer-term outcomes to be assessed. Unfortunately the ArtZone programme did not receive further funding at the end of the three year project, however art supplies continued to be made available to the community groups and material lists were provided for the secure hospitals and Zinc Arts have maintained contact with all of the participating organisations. Assessment of any continuation of self-started groups and individual continuation of arts activities which arose from the Zinc Arts programme is an important avenue for future research. Participatory arts interventions may serve as a useful tool in tackling the rising rates of mental ill health amongst young people, whilst also addressing UK recommendations from Public Health England (2013) and global recommendations from the WHO (2005).
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Creative learning through the arts an action plan for Wales

Creative learning through the arts an action plan for Wales

The findings of this review, together with the outcomes of the Arts Council of Wales research, will inform our future actions. Wherever they are on their creative journey, young people need access to balanced and informative advice on careers so that they are aware of the opportunities available and the skills required. We recognise that there is work do be done with stakeholders and partners such as sector skills councils, and our national cultural organisations, on how young people can gain a better understanding about pathways into this sector. We will explore options for communicating information on opportunities and career pathways to teachers and learners. We will also ask Careers Wales to work with the arts and creative sectors to provide up-to-date and accessible online information about occupations.
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The Power of creative learning through the Arts: economic imperative or social good?

The Power of creative learning through the Arts: economic imperative or social good?

over the body of teachers, and by extension pupils, but the bodies of the AWE programme are not ‘docile’; they will not be put to use in the manner intended by Government. The message that being creative was enough was not always accepted, however, and at times, there was a disconnect between the artists’ aims, and the expectations of the school/staff. One session began with a staff room discussion regarding the need to include everyone in the school in a creative, arts project, without considering creative ways of doing so. It was understood that in order for the activity to be truly inclusive, every pupil should have equal access to equal experience. This perception then set off a train of conversation about the impossibility of such a task, given the difficulties in timetabling, staffing, and resourcing such an ambitious event. Staff were looking to the Network to deliver a one-off project that would meet curriculum/school objectives, and produce a piece of public art. Whereas, the AWE team were advocating for a different approach to inclusivity that is democratic in the sense of ensuring everyone is involved to whatever degree they are able, capable, interested. Through this programme, the Arts Champions advocated the benefits of the arts for social good, emphasising the personal over the political, and focusing on the value of creativity in and of itself, rather than in reference to an end product or pre-determined learning outcome – “being creative is enough”.
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Creative ESOL Programme: Islington Schools Evaluation Report

Creative ESOL Programme: Islington Schools Evaluation Report

Student D has shown huge growth in confidence. Her language skills were and are substantially less advanced than the majority of the group. At the start of the project she was very quiet and reserved, she barely spoke and although she was very affectionate with other students and clearly had friends she didn’t really participate with language or with creative tasks. A turning point was her intervention during a forum theatre play about an abusive Aunt, where she got up and had a go at intervention (ie trying to combat her oppressor). Even though she had limited language skills she used what language she did know to communicate really effectively and demonstrated brilliant risk taking and confidence. At the end of term 3 she had a main part in a group devised piece of forum theatre, and contributed to the process with ideas, feedback and praise for others. One week she brought in a piece of written text, which was full of ideas for the play that she had been thinking of throughout the week, in English. By the end of the project she was willing to take language and creative risks and make mistakes. She became an integral part of the group, full of energy and highly engaged. Her vocabulary and grasp of grammar have developed hugely through task based activities.
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Best-practice model for technology enhanced learning in the creative arts

Best-practice model for technology enhanced learning in the creative arts

Summary The model presented in this paper was shown to be effective in terms of improving the navigation and aesthetics for creative learners. It was praised by staff and students alike. Inadvertently, it raised levels of digital literacy as more academics became interested in and engaged with exploring new opportunities for developing exciting visually stimulating learning environments, involving techniques that they were previously unaware of. The design technologist was able to share good practice between different module leaders by providing a visual interface which staff and students alike wanted to engage with. The ARCS model adopted by Keller (1987) suggested that in order to motivate learning, the attention of the students should be sought first, followed by delivering relevant content, generating confidence of the students on the subject matter and, finally, making the students satisfied with their achievement of the learning objective. To facilitate this process, we have removed technology barriers by providing an expert, which made it easier for the staff to improve the visual interface and navigation. In this way, we could apply the ARCS motivational model to the VLE to motivate students to engage through the application of the combined knowledge of the technology expert and the academic staff. The technology experts can exercise their skills to seek students’ attention and build their confidence by improving the aesthetics and navigation of the VLE space; meanwhile, the academics could bring in their subject knowledge making the content of the VLE relevant and improve student confidence leading to their satisfaction. The model, which is proposed as a best-practice model, was developed to achieve an improved VLE experience and is based on Kemmis and McTaggart’s (1988) action research cycle model. Academic staff were provided with the opportunity to step back cognitively from their routine practices in relation to their use of the VLE and questioned and reconsidered the established methods of VLE use in their day-to-day teaching and learning activities, which resulted in the VLE moving from a repository model to a companion in learning.
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UNIVERSITY FOR THE CREATIVE ARTS PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR: BA (HONS) FASHION TEXTILES: PRINT

UNIVERSITY FOR THE CREATIVE ARTS PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR: BA (HONS) FASHION TEXTILES: PRINT

The course team believes in the integration of research, theory and practice, in critical and reflective methodologies as well as learning methods. This philosophy is embedded in the academic content of the assignments and in teaching delivery. The course benefits from the considerable resources provided by the proximity of creative industries in London, and this is used to bring in regular guest practitioners to deliver lectures or teach in seminars or workshops on specific projects. This ensures, alongside the expertise of staff and local technicians that contemporary and current approaches to respective fields are maintained, and provides critical external perspectives. For a course that is founded on the close observation of the latest stylistic developments, these elements are indeed critical.
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Performing and Creative Arts

Performing and Creative Arts

Online Learning Studying through Federation University Australia online allows you to complete exactly the same course as an on-campus student, but with the flexibility of studying from home. It’s the perfect option if you need to balance your studies with work, family or other commitments. Instead of attending classes in person, your course is delivered entirely through Online Learning, which may include recorded audio or video lectures, a set of readings, questions posted in a discussion forum or an online quiz.

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Dewsbury Creative Town Arts Programme Enhancing the town through art in public spaces. Artist Brief: TRANSFORMING MARKET, DEWSBURY

Dewsbury Creative Town Arts Programme Enhancing the town through art in public spaces. Artist Brief: TRANSFORMING MARKET, DEWSBURY

We welcome applications from artists proposing to work collaboratively. The artist collective will have complementary experience to achieve key elements of the brief including engagement, capturing and interpreting memories and stories, design and application via paint/vinyl. We welcome joint applications from artists working in the fields of social engagement, street art, murals, illustration, large-scale painting, graphic design, poetry and spoken word and artists underrepresented in the field of public arts. We are particularly interested in applicants from the Yorkshire and Humber region.
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Evaluation of a dementia care learning programme

Evaluation of a dementia care learning programme

The BP programme trains and supports facilitators based in care settings to take a group of their own staff through a programme of training in dementia care over a six-month period. At the end of the programme, staff who complete the course produce a reflective exercise in which they consider a difficult issue that they have faced in their work and how they would have addressed the problem before and after completing the course. The programme is managed on national and international levels by the DSDC and staff from the centre score these reflective exercises. Participants who demonstrate mastery of course material and achieve learning outcomes receive a certificate of completion.
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Translanguaging space and creative activity: theorising collaborative arts-based learning

Translanguaging space and creative activity: theorising collaborative arts-based learning

“collaborative reading and interpretation, between the ethnographer and his or her interlocutors, of the very ethnographic text itself” . In becoming ethnographers, the young people are developing research skills across the programme which enables them to develop their critical reading and analysis of the communities in which they live and study. Likewise, as workshop facilitators and researchers we are also ‘co - learners’ (Garcí a & Li Wei, 2014, p. 112), and as such we make deliberate steps to disrupt and challenge the hierarchies of research and of the workshop space – for example, through developing creative activities which are led by the young people and through the design of the fieldwork which aims to draw out the participants’ own observations rather than a prescribed set of features. Collage here works as a
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Translanguaging space and creative activity : theorising collaborative arts-based learning

Translanguaging space and creative activity : theorising collaborative arts-based learning

“collaborative reading and interpretation, between the ethnographer and his or her interlocutors, of the very ethnographic text itself” . In becoming ethnographers, the young people are developing research skills across the programme which enables them to develop their critical reading and analysis of the communities in which they live and study. Likewise, as workshop facilitators and researchers we are also ‘co - learners’ (Garcí a & Li Wei, 2014, p. 112), and as such we make deliberate steps to disrupt and challenge the hierarchies of research and of the workshop space – for example, through developing creative activities which are led by the young people and through the design of the fieldwork which aims to draw out the participants’ own observations rather than a prescribed set of features. Collage here works as a
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Leading with difference: the particular case of learning and teaching leadership in the creative arts

Leading with difference: the particular case of learning and teaching leadership in the creative arts

studio-based teaching; and, the ‘final show’. All of these practices require students and teachers to work closely together in collaborative and cooperative practice. Small group teaching is a feature of project-based learning that is normally conducted in small groups or as individual student activities, but in both cases, the interaction between student and teacher is usually frequent and close. The final show is effectively an independent learning project which affords the student more time to progress from project proposal, through experimentation processes and execution, to final exhibition. Blair (2010) has also discussed the practice of the public critique or
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TEACHING AND LEARNING IN HIGHER AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION (Performing Arts) PROGRAMME

TEACHING AND LEARNING IN HIGHER AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION (Performing Arts) PROGRAMME

Professional Certificate 13/14 (performing arts pathway) The 2013/14 Programme The modular Teaching and Learning in Higher and Professional Education programme caters for those in the professions who want to develop their understanding of, and expertise, in teaching and learning. The specialist training pathway for performing arts is delivered through a partnership between the Guildhall School of Music & Drama and the Institute of Education, and is designed for those in the performing arts profession who wish to gain accreditation for teaching in higher education, including conservatoires.
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Qualitative research in the creative arts

Qualitative research in the creative arts

‘codes’ did not automatically fit with collections of notes, objects, photocopies, printed ephemera and drawings in artists’ visual diaries and journals, the delving into what ‘data’ can be and how codes can be applied can become part of the spiraling journey of reappraisal and learning. In Table 1, I demonstrate how artists ~ researchers are assured of reflective questioning by the time they have to do this in point 6, ‘Analyse Additional Data’. In my quest to bring ‘art and ephemera’ to a position of regard in the art industry, I was as stated in point 6, ‘Explor[ing] further relationship between practice and theory in ‘art and change’, new artists, exhibitions and catalogue statements, neo- narratives and new memories. Thus when this was ready to be applied to theorizing from writers with postmodernist perspectives, I could ‘illuminate discourses in visual arts and related areas. ’ My recognition of these strategies led to being able to apply art forms from the mundane through to the sacred. This table assisted my recognition of going deeper into layers of questioning and synthesizing that data.
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