Top PDF Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

4.27 We know from Lamont, Jeffes and Lord (2010) that CP produced a range of impacts for teachers – in their study these are termed personal, interpersonal and leadership, teaching and learning and career impacts. These were significant impacts, not only signalling increased confidence in mobilising the arts and culture and creative practices but also, in a deeper sense, reenergising their teaching practice generally. For many, building awareness of creative learning was a way of reconnecting to fundamental drivers associated with teaching – educating the whole child, being attainment focused but not test or exam obsessed and so forth. Similar findings were identified in the evaluation of the CCiSS programme in Scotland (Scottish Arts Council, 2010).
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Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

Evaluation of the Creative Learning through the Arts programme

6.10 The general perception was that the programme administration team were working at ‘full capacity’ — in terms of the number of schools with which they were working, their monitoring activity, etc. — with little if any capacity to undertake additional activities, such as a greater reflection on lessons learnt and the dissemination of findings both nationally and regionally. This is of concern, as the administrative burden within the programme will increase in the coming years as more schools join the Lead Creative Schools Scheme (which is due to peak during the 2017/18 academic year), apply for ‘Go and See’ funding, etc. It is important to note that the Arts Council of Wales have already responded to this finding by reviewing their processes and are committed to doing so on an ongoing basis. We would also expect to see efficiency increase within the system in the coming years, as systems have now been set up and ‘teething problems’ should have been
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A community arts programme for older people : an evaluation

A community arts programme for older people : an evaluation

Participants reported feeling more positively about ageing and being more motivated to pursue new opportunities at the end of the programme. Five themes emerged from the focus group interviews, namely i) age and ageing, ii) the finished product, iii) new opportunities, iv) aspirations and the future and v) personal benefits. These related to increased confidence, having greater creative expression, meaningful occupation and opportunities for socialisation.

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Creating Creative Learning Environments by Creative Partnerships Programme—Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics  Programme in Pécs

Creating Creative Learning Environments by Creative Partnerships Programme—Evaluation of the Creative Partnerships Pilot Mathematics Programme in Pécs

A Creative Partnerships programme is focused on the long-term relationship between creative practitioners and schools. Creative professionals from various branches (of arts) help students master different types of knowledge and skills. Creative practitioners bring new expectations, which clearly challenge students. But it is not only students that are jerked out of the rut of daily routine by the new learning process—schools as a whole and mainly teachers are highly affected. Creative Partnerships has developed a pedagogical approach known as the “high functioning classroom” which encourages teachers to change their classroom practice so that lessons are re- plete with challenges that relate learning to real-life situations; where students are engaged physically and socially, as well as emotionally and intellectually; and where students’ own experi- ences, observations and questions take centre stage. The transformation of teaching and learning is based on creative processes which are channelled into classrooms and school life. Techniques applied in the methodologies of teaching various subjects are derived from artistic practices. Whilst working in the classroom with the students, the artist remains an artist, and the teacher remains a teacher. The programme does not offer arts education. What the Creative Partnerships programme does is to prepare artists to work with teachers and students to bring about sustain- able changes in teachers’ teaching practice. The aim of the present paper is to present the main results of qualitative and quantitative research measuring the impact of the Creative Partnerships pilot programme on certain competencies, reading skills development and maths knowledge of the participating (socially disadvantaged) students.
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Promoting young people’s mental health and well being through participation in the arts: A mixed methods service evaluation of the Zinc Arts ArtZone programme

Promoting young people’s mental health and well being through participation in the arts: A mixed methods service evaluation of the Zinc Arts ArtZone programme

participatory arts programme. The key now is to ensure sustainability of the programme in order for the work to continue and for longer-term outcomes to be assessed. Unfortunately the ArtZone programme did not receive further funding at the end of the three year project, however art supplies continued to be made available to the community groups and material lists were provided for the secure hospitals and Zinc Arts have maintained contact with all of the participating organisations. Assessment of any continuation of self-started groups and individual continuation of arts activities which arose from the Zinc Arts programme is an important avenue for future research. Participatory arts interventions may serve as a useful tool in tackling the rising rates of mental ill health amongst young people, whilst also addressing UK recommendations from Public Health England (2013) and global recommendations from the WHO (2005).
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The art of walking. Fostering experiential learning through observation and creative practice

The art of walking. Fostering experiential learning through observation and creative practice

This paper explores how the art of walking can foster learning through everyday observation and creative practice. Based on an empirical case study investigating postgraduate students’ learning through a specially designed pedagogical activity of ‘City Walks’, in what follows I suggest the need for practice-based, experiential learning and discuss existent pedagogic debates on walking in the city and creative processes. Following Kolb (1984), experiential learning reinforces active learning processes where students “learn by doing” through fieldwork, observation and experience. To discuss experiential learning through the art of walking, I examine the ‘City Walks’, a teaching activity that I designed for an MA module in a creative and arts programme at King’s College London. I draw on my observations as the module leader and data collected from a student questionnaire to offer evaluative reflections on this activity. My findings reveal the ‘City Walks’ were an effective pedagogical activity that can link the theories learned in the classroom to everyday urban observation and creative practice. This exercise increased the level of creative intellectual exchange between students. Through the analysis of this pedagogical activity as a meta-learning experience, I conclude with four main strategies to further enhance the art of walking as a pedagogical tool.
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Evaluation of the Assessment is for Learning programme

Evaluation of the Assessment is for Learning programme

A secondary and 4 of its cluster primaries involved in Project 5 devised an assessment grid for skills in a science unit with a description of what was required at levels C, D and E. A pupil friendly version was prepared for pupils in P6 and P7. At the start of the unit the children coded the grid using ‘traffic lights’: Green – ‘If you think you are good at this skill’; Orange – ‘If you think you need help’; Red – ‘If you can’t do this skill at all’. The pupils thought that this was helpful for a number of reasons: ‘it allowed the teacher to know who to help most’; ‘you filled it in at the beginning and then you went back and changed it if you had made progress and so you could see when you got better’. They also indicated that it helped them focus on the things they were not good at and that it showed them that they could help themselves and not ‘just get the teachers to help’. Some said that at first with self- assessment they would ‘colour it green’ just to say ‘I can do it’. However, when they realised they had to produce evidence that they could do it, they stopped doing that. Another secondary school involved in Project 5 focused on developing clear criteria for aspects of 5-14 expressive arts devising exemplars from P6 to S2 across levels B to F. The detailed exemplars showed clearly ways in which they met or did not meet the criteria for the levels. Art students studied the exemplars and criteria before starting a piece of work so they knew what they were aiming for and they were also used formatively for self-assessment to identify where they needed to improve. The students felt this was important because ‘in art everyone draws differently’ and you needed to be able ‘to apply the criteria to your own work’. This was better than getting a grade because ‘a grade isn’t enough to help you improve – you need to know what you have to do to make it better’. They did, however, still need the advice and support of the expert [the teacher].
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Translanguaging space and creative activity: theorising collaborative arts-based learning

Translanguaging space and creative activity: theorising collaborative arts-based learning

This paper described the LS-C research-based arts-based learning programme through which young people become ethnographic researchers of areas of multilingual inner- city Leeds. The programme takes the linguistic landscape as its starting point to develop collaborative ways of conducting research into multilingualism in the street. We focused on one of the arts-based activities, collage, and considered the concept of translanguaging space through analysis of the collage process and the resultant artefacts. In doing so we developed the case for methodologies of this kind as extending the scope of research into urban multilingualism. Yuen suggests that in using arts-based methods such as collage in research, in this case collaborative research with young people, enables us to ‘move beyond the margins’ (2016, p.344). In the case of LS-C, we move beyond the margins in developing ways of working which enable voices to be made audible and visible, and sketch out the possibilities for collaborative arts-based research into language and communication which extends beyond bounded languages and modalities. The collage process and the collages themselves demonstrate the new meanings and understandings (Norris, 2008, in Butler-Kisber, 2004, p.104) that develop through collaborative research with young people in which ‘the research becomes a co -creator and sharer of stories, provocations and ideas, a facilitator and collaborator’ (Parry, 2015, p.96). This has significant theoretical, epistemological and methodological implications for research of this kind.
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Translanguaging space and creative activity : theorising collaborative arts-based learning

Translanguaging space and creative activity : theorising collaborative arts-based learning

This paper described the LS-C research-based arts-based learning programme through which young people become ethnographic researchers of areas of multilingual inner- city Leeds. The programme takes the linguistic landscape as its starting point to develop collaborative ways of conducting research into multilingualism in the street. We focused on one of the arts-based activities, collage, and considered the concept of translanguaging space through analysis of the collage process and the resultant artefacts. In doing so we developed the case for methodologies of this kind as extending the scope of research into urban multilingualism. Yuen suggests that in using arts-based methods such as collage in research, in this case collaborative research with young people, enables us to ‘move beyond the margins’ (2016, p.344). In the case of LS-C, we move beyond the margins in developing ways of working which enable voices to be made audible and visible, and sketch out the possibilities for collaborative arts-based research into language and communication which extends beyond bounded languages and modalities. The collage process and the collages themselves demonstrate the new meanings and understandings (Norris, 2008, in Butler-Kisber, 2004, p.104) that develop through collaborative research with young people in which ‘the research becomes a co -creator and sharer of stories, provocations and ideas, a facilitator and collaborator’ (Parry, 2015, p.96). This has significant theoretical, epistemological and methodological implications for research of this kind.
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Music in time: An evaluation of a participatory creative music programme for older prisoners

Music in time: An evaluation of a participatory creative music programme for older prisoners

As is evident in Table 2, volunteers were therefore recruited from two VPUs (at HMP Dartmoor and HMP Channings Wood), which had the highest proportions of over- 50s, while the other groups, which were under-represented by over-50s, were recruited from the main wings of their respective prisons. In HMP Exeter, around fifty prisoners aged over 50 years were identified by the ACOOP representative as potential recruits, but most were on the VPU and it transpired that for security reasons it would not be possible to involve these prisoners. Therefore the programme at HMP Exeter was run with prisoners from the main wings, which drew a number of foreign nationals and a small proportion over over-50s who subsequently did not attend all the sessions. The VPU group at HMP Channings Wood, by contrast, included only one participant who was aged under 50 years. In HMP Dartmoor, two music programmes were organized independently, using different musicians, a VPU group and a group recruited from the main wings. There were older prisoners in both groups, with the highest proportion from the VPU. There was a core of older prisoners in both groups who became active and enthusiastic participants. Several of the younger prisoners recruited from the main wings were already good musicians and keen to be involved; they made a welcome addition to the group. As stated, HMP Shepton Mallet was planned as a site for the project since it accommodates life sentenced prisoners, has a higher proportion of older prisoners and is therefore supported with a dedicated ACOOP team; unfortunately, though, HMP Shepton Mallet was unable to participate in the project. Neither HMP Eastwood Park nor HMP the Verne had ACOOP representatives available to link up with older prisoners within these establishments, so, given the short lead-in time to these programmes, leaflets were distributed by Heads of Learning and Skills across all prisoners. Since HMP the Verne had an active programme of music activities, led by the Chaplaincy, it was relatively easy to set up a programme at short notice. However, in both these prisons most participants were from younger age groups.
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GRADUATE SCHOOL CREATIVE WRITING POSTGRADUATE: MASTERS PROGRAMME 2015 SCHOOL OF ARTS, LANGUAGES AND CULTURES

GRADUATE SCHOOL CREATIVE WRITING POSTGRADUATE: MASTERS PROGRAMME 2015 SCHOOL OF ARTS, LANGUAGES AND CULTURES

Research and teaching in the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures are supported by rich resources within the University. These include the John Rylands University Library, with its unique Special Collections housed in the refurbished Deansgate building; the University Language Centre, with its own language multi-media resource library; the Race Relations Archive; the Manchester Museum and the Whitworth Art Gallery. Other cultural assets at the University of Manchester include the Martin Harris Centre for Music and Drama, Jodrell Bank Observatory and the Alan Gilbert Learning Commons. The School has a strong interdisciplinary orientation and houses the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Arts and Languages (CIDRAL).
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The art of walking. Fostering experiential learning through observation and creative practice

The art of walking. Fostering experiential learning through observation and creative practice

This paper explores how the art of walking can foster learning through everyday observation and creative practice. Based on an empirical case study investigating postgraduate students’ learning through a specially designed pedagogical activity of ‘City Walks’, I suggest the need for practice-based, experiential learning and discuss existent pedagogic debates on walking in the city and creative processes. Following Kolb (1984), experiential learning reinforces active learning processes where students “learn by doing” through fieldwork, observation and experience. To discuss experiential learning through the art of walking, I examine the ‘City Walks’, a teaching activity that I designed for an MA module in a creative and arts programme at King’s College London. I draw on my observations as the module leader and data collected from a student questionnaire to offer evaluative reflections on this activity. My findings reveal that the ‘City Walks’ were an effective pedagogical activity that can link the theories learned in the classroom to everyday urban observation and creative practice. This exercise increased the level of creative intellectual exchange between students. Through the analysis of this pedagogical activity as a meta-learning experience, I conclude with four main strategies to further enhance the art of walking as a pedagogical tool.
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The Power of creative learning through the Arts: economic imperative or social good?

The Power of creative learning through the Arts: economic imperative or social good?

Catherine 2 , the unofficial ‘leader’ of the team, as supporting teachers by, “looking at where their interest in the creative arts started, and how they wanted to deliver that back into the classroom, in a holistic way.” Catherine also described how this connected with the key benefit of the AWE programme as she saw it, and explained that, “the wellbeing aspect was really important as an element of this because it all sort of filtered across the sessions we were going to deliver.” Both interviewees felt that, while there were skills and techniques that they could share in the sessions, the overall aim of the programme should be about “showing care” by giving teachers the opportunity to explore their own creativity and take time for themselves, and for each other. The hope was that this would have a knock-on, positive effect on the culture of the classroom – and wider school. Discussing their role in this process brought up some forceful opinions relating to the language used in the Welsh Government and Arts Council of Wales action plan. The team as a whole strongly rejected the term, ‘Arts Champions’ since they believed it established a hierarchy of expertise that they did not recognise, or find helpful. Rachel and Catherine, the two interviewees, also found the concept of ‘creative learning’ problematic in describing their practice. Despite wholehearted approval of Dai Smith’s report, and in positive anticipation of the new, ‘Donaldson’ curriculum, they both rejected ‘creative learning’ as a meaningful concept since it implied classroom practice rather than any wider arts-based activities or creativity. They expressed concerns that the connotations of such language did not support teachers in developing their own
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Department M Creative Arts & Crafts

Department M Creative Arts & Crafts

Do you have a box full of fair award ribbons? Have you always thought, “I should really do something with those...?” Do you know someone with an award ribbon stash? Are you feeling crafty? Even if you have just a few ribbons to show off, could you feature them in a new project? If you can answer “yes” to these questions, it’s time to get creative and bring those ribbons back out into the light!

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INVITATION TO TENDER for a Programme Evaluation of the Digital R&D Fund for the Arts

INVITATION TO TENDER for a Programme Evaluation of the Digital R&D Fund for the Arts

The evaluation will take place concurrently with the completion of funded project. It will only, therefore, be able to make an early assessment of the outcomes achieved and draw preliminary conclusions about the potential of the programme to meet its longer-term development aims.

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President s Committee on the Arts And the humanities. Reinvesting. in Arts Education. Winning America s Future Through Creative Schools

President s Committee on the Arts And the humanities. Reinvesting. in Arts Education. Winning America s Future Through Creative Schools

Even in places where arts education funding continues at some level, the opportunities are not equitably distributed among schools and the students they serve. There is increasing evidence that the students in schools that are most challenged and serving the highest need student populations often have the fewest arts opportunities. While this pattern is similar to the pattern of inequities associated with other education resources, in practice it means that the students who could benefit most from the increased motivation and life/workforce skills fostered by engagement with the arts in school are the least likely to have the oppor- tunity. In response to Congressional request, the U.S. Government Accountability Office conducted a survey of access to arts education and found that there was a significant dif- ference among the percent of teachers reporting decreased time spent on arts education. In schools identified as needing improvement and/or with higher percentages of minority students, teachers were much more likely to report a reduction in time spent in arts instruc- tion (GAO, 2009). Of great concern, respondents to a survey of arts participation from some minority groups (African American and Latino) are only half as likely to report having had arts lessons or classes in school as others. 26 The declines in childhood arts education since
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Pre planning for Service Learning: Creative Strategies through the Lens of Poverty

Pre planning for Service Learning: Creative Strategies through the Lens of Poverty

Abstract College students involved in service learning are often challenged to consider a deeper appreciation for persons from diverse populations. Many clients in the community organizations we serve are financially disadvantaged. To increase understanding of this common social condition, we implemented pedagogical techniques to bring the realities of poverty into our service-learning course. The purpose of this paper is to describe three different strategies, ranging from pre-packaged programming to self-designed activities, which were used to educate students about the role of poverty in society. These strategies included, 1) a Poverty Simulation which “enables participants to view poverty from different perspectives in an experiential setting”, 2) engagement with impoverished clients from a local organization, and 3) group activities using online resources such as videos, a poverty quiz, and games. Students were asked to reflect on their previous views on poverty and how these activities affected them. The aim of these strategies was to encourage students to consider a broad range of perspectives (personal, community, and policy), recognize biases and stereotypes, and link the service learning experience to a broader context in society.
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Evaluation of the Creative Skills of the Classroom Teacher Candidates' Taking Visual Arts Training Course

Evaluation of the Creative Skills of the Classroom Teacher Candidates' Taking Visual Arts Training Course

As Students see assignment exam as a challenge to be a teacher they tend to concentrate more on this exam. Such courses outside the exam are considered by the students as loss of time. They don’t want to spend time over such courses. They can have good results if they stop worrying about these exams. Moreover, getting marks in imaginary design courses in visual arts education, repetitions of the same subjects, not placing distinctive, creative and interesting studies during lesson have lead to lack of interest of the students on drawing. The idea that drawing can even be learned in adulthood and they can increase their self confidence and create new works, instead of the idea that they have not ability to draw from the birth is imposed on students, they could be successful.
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Using the Creative Arts in Grief Therapy

Using the Creative Arts in Grief Therapy

There is less research available on the use of children‟s drawings in the context of dealing with grief and bereavement compared to those with a terminal illness and sexual abuse. However, Malchioli‟s use of the drawing process in children‟s therapy can be adapted to those dealing with bereavement. As a drawing is executed in the presence of the counsellor, great insight into the thoughts of the child can be gained as questions are asked and the child talks about the various element of the drawing. The child is then able to externalize the issues they are concerned with through their drawings as they talk about it and the counsellor gains a clearer understanding of the child‟s thought processes.
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Evaluation of North Lanarkshire's cooperative learning programme

Evaluation of North Lanarkshire's cooperative learning programme

appointment clock (where each child has a drawn up clock in which peers’ names are written at 3, 6, 9 and 12 o’clock and the teacher specifies which appointment needs to be worked with) and the jigsaw activity (where the pupils are handed part of a picture and need to find the other ‘jigsaw’ parts). A number of the observed lessons used the ‘expert group’ approach. The pupils started in their base groups, then went on to learn a new element of a particular topic in an expert group and subsequently had to go back to their base group or the whole class to disseminate and teach the newly learnt skill or knowledge. For example, in a Higher Physical Education lesson, expert groups were formed with each focusing on one stage of learning a skill, i.e. the cognitive, associative and automatic stages. Pupils then returned to their base group and each had to teach their particular stage to the rest of the group. Interestingly, in the same class this approach was used as an energiser half-way through a double period. The expert groups each learned a few moves/steps of a dance, after which they then taught the others in their base group to eventually put all moves together in a sequence – an activity which appeared to be greatly enjoyed by the class. A Higher History lesson used graffiti sheets to facilitate the process of brainstorming. In the base groups, one sheet for each of five topics was passed around and each person in each group was required to write down as much as they could think of in relation to the topic. The pupils were then re-grouped and each expert group focused on identifying the key points of a particular topic and ways of remembering them, after which the pupils went back to their initial base groups to teach the rest of the group what they had learned. The objective of expert groups is to reach higher order learning, i.e. thinking that occurs at higher levels of abstraction. By teaching what they have learned, pupils will reinforce their own learning and improve retention of content, as illustrated in the learning pyramid (Craigen & Green in Cooperative Learning Resource Booklet).
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