Top PDF Replication Research in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) : Replication of Neri et al. (2008) and Satar & Ӧzdener (2008).

Replication Research in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) : Replication of Neri et al. (2008) and Satar & Ӧzdener (2008).

Replication Research in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) : Replication of Neri et al. (2008) and Satar & Ӧzdener (2008).

in success in language acquisition and individual differences has been found to play an important role in determining success (Polio 2012). Further, the nature of children’s speech in comparison with that of adults, has meant that it has been necessary to develop dedicated algorithms to recognise and detect errors in their speech (Gerosa & Giuliani 2004).

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Teachers’ perceptions of lessons using computer assisted language learning

Teachers’ perceptions of lessons using computer assisted language learning

One of the problems that are faced by teachers in using computers in language teaching is the lack of computer knowledge among the teachers. There are certain amounts of teachers especially senior teachers who are not trained to use computers in language teaching. Furthermore, some senior teachers are refusing to attend courses that are conducted by the Ministry of Education. This negative attitude of teachers causes failure of adapting computer in teaching language. Professional development activities may not provide ongoing hands-on training for teachers or practical strategies for implementing technology into lesson plans (Jan Gahala 2001).
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Students’ Attitudes and Perceptions towards Computer-Assisted Language Learning

Students’ Attitudes and Perceptions towards Computer-Assisted Language Learning

with the students’ attitudes and perceptions, as well as with the role of computers in the learning process. Liu et al (1998) perceived integrating computers into a learning system as a complex instructional system in which student learning is affected by lecturers, computer hardware and software resources and the computer- laboratory and classroom setting. They asserted that students with positive attitudes towards computers also have positive attitudes when using them for learning. In the summer of 1999, faculty members of the Department of Instructional technology at the University of Georgia were appointed by technology leaders at Athens Academy, as to conduct a long-term evaluation of the use of portable technology in their school. The evaluation lasted four years and the report of the forth year revealed the following in regard with students’ attitudes to portable technologies used for teaching and learning. Middle school learners indicated a generally positive attitude towards computers and more specifically laptops for learning. Students of the 7 th grade perceived in a percentage of 63% that laptops improve the quality of their
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Computer-Assisted Language Learning (Call): Pedagogical Pros and Cons

Computer-Assisted Language Learning (Call): Pedagogical Pros and Cons

questions. The first attempt made to figure out if there were any significant differences between students achievement mean scores in grammar attributed to either traditional teaching or computerized one. The second question stated to find if there are any differences between students‟ mean scores in grammar attributed to the stream of study ( scientific & literary) and the last question related to the gender of participants and their achievement mean scores would be compared based on their genders. The findings and the results of the first question were really noticeable that the mean score of the experimental group was (26.21) and of the control group was (23.95) which the difference is remarkably higher in comparison with the pre-test in which the mean scores for experimental and control group were (22.09) and (21.66) respectively. Regarding the passive voice test, the use of software program had a great effect on students‟ learning. Surprisingly, the result related to the second question was further proof of how CALL was effective on scientific students. Comparing scientific students‟ mean scores with literary ones, the former group gained a higher score in the post-test (25.56) than the latter one (24.6). This means that scientific students that benefited CALL and specifically a software program could have a better mark. The third result came out was attributed to the gender variable. It showed that males surpassed females in the post-test with higher mean scores, (24.46) and (25.7). The upshot of the findings was that males are more interested in computers and multi-media than females (Nabah et al., 2009). The secondary students‟ experience of web-based language acquisition is a study
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Diagnostic Processing of Japanese for Computer Assisted Second Language Learning

Diagnostic Processing of Japanese for Computer Assisted Second Language Learning

LTAG(Lexicalized Tree Adjoining Gram- mar) is a lexicalized grammatical formalism (XTAG Research Group, 1995). For ease of diagnosing the erroneous sentences com- posed by the students, lexicalized type of grammars seemed most suitable. Comparing HPSG(Head-driven Phrase Structure Gram- mar) (C.Pollard et al., 1994) and LTAG, the well-known two (almost-)lexicalized gram- mars, LTAG looked more simple and espe- cially convenient for sentence generation nec- essary in diagnosis. LTAG systematically as- sociates an elementary tree structure with a lexical anchor and the structure is embedded in the corresponding lexical item. Associated with each of the external nodes of the embed- ded tree structure are feature structures such as inflection, case information, head symbol, semantic constraints as well as a difference list for surface expressions. These features have their origin in the anchored lexical item. The feature information can, moreover, in- clude the knowledge of situated language use. Appearance of the features at the external nodes of the lexical items greatly facilitates generation of local phrases which is indispens- able in diagnostic parsing. These are the rea- son why we employed LTAG.
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Review of Computer-Assisted Language Learning: History, Merits & Barriers

Review of Computer-Assisted Language Learning: History, Merits & Barriers

On the one hand, Cabrini Simões (2007) mentioned some advantages of applying the technology, mostly the Internet, in language education. According to this paper, teachers have the opportunity to call students’ attention by using sounds, images, colors, different types of letters etc. Thus, it helps the students to visualize the contents in a better and more efficient way. Also, technology allows learners to participate in the culture of the target language, which in turn can enable them to further learn how cultural background influences one’s view of the world (Singhal, 1997). Moreover, students not only have access to other people’s work, but they may also generate their own work to be published (Singhal, 1997). Furthermore, students may use the Internet to search for additional language activities (Singhal, 1997). It also mentioned that the use of the Internet has also been shown to promote higher order thinking skills. The Internet may increase student’s motivation (Lee, 2000); and the Internet provides greater interaction (Lee, 2000). There are some activities in the Internet that give students positive and negative feedback by automatically correcting their on-line exercises (Lee, 2000). From the larger perspective, the Internet provides global understanding (Lee, 2000). Also he noted that, exchanging e-mail provides students with an excellent opportunity for real, natural communication (Warschauer, 1995). Finally, the Internet allows students around the world to interact with one another cheaply, quickly and reliably (Cabrini Simões, 2007, pp.31-33). On the other hand, sometimes it may take time to access information (Singhal, 1997). Also, the lack of training on the part of the teachers to implement the Internet in the language classroom is another negative factor (Singhal, 1997). Moreover, the Internet offers access to all types of issues and topics, some of which are unsuitable for children, and this lack of limits in itself may result in various problems (Singhal, 1997). The lack of infrastructure/ facilities is a barrier for implementing technology in language classes (Corrêa, 2001). Finally, surfing the net can be fun and/or time consuming (Corrêa, 2001) (Cabrini Simões, 2007, p.33).
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INTEGRATING CALL INTO THE EFL CLASSROOM

INTEGRATING CALL INTO THE EFL CLASSROOM

Abstract. Many researches has shown that using CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) in teaching EFL (English as Foreign Language) can lead towards an effective learning outcome where students can practice the language in an interactive and authentic manner, with the help of multi-media. CALL enhances students‟ achievement, while at the same time „increases motivation and autonomy in learning‟ (Doughty 2003, p 57).

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The Evaluation of Using Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Facilities in Developing EFL Among Islamic Azad University Practitioners: The Case of Computer Literacy

The Evaluation of Using Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Facilities in Developing EFL Among Islamic Azad University Practitioners: The Case of Computer Literacy

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, psychology started to change from a behavioristic approach to cognitive one. Cognitive psychology regarding CALL includes the study of attention, pattern recognition, memory, language, reading, writing, and problem solving (Best, 1989) in using virtual interaction. The modern development of cognitive psychology has been strongly influenced by the information processing approach, developments in computer science, especially artificial intelligence (AI), and developments in linguistics. Moreover, the notion of schemata or script is a central concept in cognitive view. According to Doughty (1991), comprehension consists of three stages: locating a schema that appears to match the linguistic input, finding the elements of the input that correlate to the roles of schema, and making inferences to cover the gaps.
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Proceedings of the 8th Workshop on NLP for Computer Assisted Language Learning

Proceedings of the 8th Workshop on NLP for Computer Assisted Language Learning

The intersection of Natural Language Processing (or Language Technology / Computational Linguistics) and Speech Technology with Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) brings “understanding” of language to CALL tools, thus making CALL intelligent. This fact has given the name for this area of research – Intelligent CALL, ICALL. As the definition suggests, apart from having excellent knowledge of Natural Language Processing and/or Speech Technology, ICALL researchers need good insights into second language acquisition theories and practices, as well as knowledge of second language pedagogy and didactics. This workshop invites
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The Effect of Using Lingoes Software on EFL Learners' Vocabulary Pronunciation

The Effect of Using Lingoes Software on EFL Learners' Vocabulary Pronunciation

This quasi-experimental study aimed to investigate the effect of Lingoes software on vocabulary pronunciation of Iranian EFL students. The participants consisted of 42 second grade students. Control group was taught by traditional instruction while the experimental group received Lingoes instruction and practiced pronunciation of vocabulary for twenty minutes two times a week over the period of eight weeks. The achievement test on pronunciation of vocabulary was used to collect data. Pre-test was used at the outset of the study to find out whether the levels of the two groups are equivalent in terms of their achievement and then post-test was administered. The results revealed that using lingoes as instructional tool improved the students' pronunciation skill in the experimental group. Keywords: Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL), Computer Assisted Pronunciation Teaching (CAPT), Vocational School, Computing, Accounting
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Language Learning Generators — From Traditional Language Learning Methodologies to Future Computer Assisted Technologies

Language Learning Generators — From Traditional Language Learning Methodologies to Future Computer Assisted Technologies

To my concern, the academic results of those students with Activist Style are usually much worse than the students with Theorist and Reflector Style, probably due to the insistence of the publishing houses to help them in text books. We can conclude with clear evidence that the publishing houses do not consider the different Learning Styles at the time of programming their books. On the one hand, they do not seem to consider the percentage of representation of the pupils belonging to each Learning Style. But on the other hand, they seem to consider the spread tendency in the different methods of education of the foreign languages, since they are centered in the natural method, leaving aside, for example, grammar explanations that would could help students with Theorist Style. Paradoxically, they do not turn out to be very communicative since they do not include a great variety of communicative exercises, which could help the students from Activist and Pragmatist Style. This must be because the text books are designed considering educative contexts where classes have a large number of students, which makes the accomplishment of these activities difficult. But this investigation has ended up finding the main failure of the tendency in education in second languages; the communicative method fails because it has an excessive use of exercises of a single Style, which is the one used by the smallest number of students (Reflector Style).
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Learning about computer-assisted language learning: online tools and professional development

Learning about computer-assisted language learning: online tools and professional development

taught themselves to use CALL in their teaching situations after a 2-hour introductory seminar on CALL outlining these self-direction strategies, he reported that the teachers experienced a range of difficulties in locating resources, finding appropriate materials and getting feedback from other experienced CALL users. He recommended CALL novices working in a self-directed environment to get involved in communities of practice where they can learn from the experiences of others and to make continuous efforts to increase their knowledge and skills for the use of CALL with the self-direction strategies. Hanson-Smith (2006) and Sharp (2011) also supported the idea of teacher communities of practice, which encourage the implementation of CALL. In addition, Curwood (2011) investigated the influence of learning communities on secondary English teachers’ use of digital tools through a year-long ethnographic case study, which collected data from multiple sources such as video recordings of meetings, field notes of observations, audio recordings of interviews and participants’ written reflections. She argued that features making technology-focused professional development effective include: “a sustained dialogue around teachers’ curricular goals and students’ learning outcomes; hands-on learning with digital tools; the ongoing analysis of student work; and a view of knowledge as a social construction” (p. 74). Regarding the role of online tools in teacher development, specifically, Wilden (2013) stated that, by using online tools, teachers can avoid professional isolation and enhance creativity, collaboration, communication and critical thinking.
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Computer mediated communication (CMC) and English for specific purposes (ESP): an investigation of the use of synchronous CMC to meet the needs of computer science students

Computer mediated communication (CMC) and English for specific purposes (ESP): an investigation of the use of synchronous CMC to meet the needs of computer science students

Academic Information Management System Computer-Assisted Language Learning Content-Based Instruction Computer-Mediated Communication Computer Science Professional Electronic Joint Applic[r]

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Resource centres and self study: issues in computer assisted language learning

Resource centres and self study: issues in computer assisted language learning

University students increasingly access computer-based materials (CBMs) beyond the classroom, in Resource Centres (RCs) – where the facilities are usually only available to students studying a specific academic discipline, in college and university libraries – where the facilities are available to all students, as well as at home and in internet cafes; and there is an increasing expectation that such materials are, at times at least, being used for self-study purposes. The pedagogical advantage of using a number of particular CBMs in both classroom-based situations and beyond is well documented. Surprisingly, however, few studies have been conducted which look at the choices that students make where a wide range of CBMs are available, as in self-study contexts, and the extent to which students view such CBMs as actually helping their learning. This paper reports on a languages-based study, which employs a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in order to examine such issues. It asks the following questions: Which CBMs do non-native speakers (NNS) of the English language make use of and why? Where access is available in a range of locations, where do students choose to work and what might the implications of this be for RCs? To what extent do students consider a variety of CBMs as actually helping with their language studies? What might the answers to these questions imply for our understanding of computer-assisted language learning (CALL)? Although this study is based in languages, its findings arguably have implications for educational practice across academic disciplines. Several themes arise out of this work; firstly, the physical location of an RC is important even when most CBMs are available elsewhere - it is suggested here that where the physical and the virtual worlds meet is a significant factor and one which warrants further investigation. Secondly, from the learners’ perspective, a wide-range of CBMs are viewed as helping with learning, irrespective of whether they fulfill a direct and obvious teaching role. Thirdly, world wide web-based delivery is the preferred to networked, and sometimes more sophisticated, commercially available multi-media CD ROM packages. Finally, live computer-mediated-communication (CMC) appears to be a considerably underused resource. These findings suggest that the validity of some of the long-established frameworks for
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Proceedings of the joint workshop on NLP for Computer Assisted Language Learning and NLP for Language Acquisition

Proceedings of the joint workshop on NLP for Computer Assisted Language Learning and NLP for Language Acquisition

The area of NLP4CALL is applied in essence, where tools, algorithms, and ready-to-use programs play an important role. It has a traditional focus on second or foreign language learning, and the target age group of school children or older. The intersection of Natural Language Processing and Speech Technology, with Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) brings “understanding” of language to CALL tools, thus making CALL intelligent. This fact has provided the name for this area of research – Intelligent CALL, ICALL. As the definition suggests, apart from having excellent knowledge of Natural Language Processing and/or Speech Technology, ICALL researchers need good insights into second language acquisition (SLA) theories and practices, second language assessment, as well as knowledge of L2 pedagogy and didactics.
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A communicative approach to computer-assisted-learning in teaching Japanese as a foreign language

A communicative approach to computer-assisted-learning in teaching Japanese as a foreign language

In this chapter, a synthesis of the theory of acquisition see 1.2 and practical development of a syllabus will be attempted by analyzing how three factors, i.e., logic, function and inte[r]

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Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) in Elementary Schools on Indonesian Context

Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) in Elementary Schools on Indonesian Context

Learning the language in elementary school is a process of language arts language skills learning which is often the dominant thing that can be observed in the process of learning. Without denying any more learning in this field becomes the main priortias in building patterns of sentence deception. The curriculum cannot be separated from the learning process itself. With the curriculum language skills of a learners are expected to have the ability to develop themselves from skills that are useful and useful for themselves and the environment. It cannot be denied that the CALL -based curriculum becomes dominant as the demands of external change within the learners themselves. Teaching the CALL based curriculum for elementary schools language learners certainly have a full prospect in their career development in the future. As the pace and development of the era, the language-based curriculum becomes dominant and strategic. The strategic review of the language arts -based curriculum can be seen from some of the challenges that accompany the learning process of the learners themselves.
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Computer Assisted Language Learning Social Networks: What Are They Talking about?

Computer Assisted Language Learning Social Networks: What Are They Talking about?

There are many reasons that bring people together in online groups. These include but are not limited to hobbies, ethnicity, education, beliefs and just about any oth- er topic or area of interest. An online community consists of a group of people, a shared purpose, policies and computer systems [6]. Thus, it is important to have tools that allow easy and straightforward ways for community members to interact with and support each other in a peer-to-peer fashion [7]. Online peer support occurs through the use of Computer-Mediated-Communication. The significance of students learning from their study peers is increasingly being recognized by the e-Learning community. In some cases, online learning can foster a greater degree of communication and closeness among students and tutors than face-to-face learning [3]. Furthermore, it has been shown that students prefer to contact their peer students rather than their tutor when they are struggling with coursework, facing difficulties in assessing facilities and understanding lectures [8].
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The Effect of Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) on Immediate and Delayed Retention of Vocabularies in General English Course

The Effect of Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) on Immediate and Delayed Retention of Vocabularies in General English Course

materials. Richards, Platt, and Platt (1992, p. 457) define retention as “the ability of the learners to recall or remem- ber things after an interval of time”. Here distinction should be made between short term recall and long term retention. The ability of learners to remember the material immediately at the end of treatment in each session is short term or im- mediate recall. This is based on Laufer’s (2007) definition for short term recall: “it is usually measured immediately after performing the task that is supposed to lead to retaining some information, after a short intervention” (p. 29). About long-term or delayed retention, there is no straightforward definition of how much time should pass between the ini- tial learning and the time we test learner on the target items. However, in this study, as far as long term retention is con- cerned, we adopt the definition provided by Laufer (2007). She asserts that “some people administer a test a week or two later, some a month or even three months, some people re- peat measurement several times to check how much learners retain at different point of time” (p. 30).
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A Study of Call-Based Instruction in Improving Listening Skills among the Engineering Students

A Study of Call-Based Instruction in Improving Listening Skills among the Engineering Students

The field of Computer Assisted Language Learning involves the use of a computer in the language learning process. Computer Assisted Language Learning programs aim to teach aspects of the language learning process through the medium of the computer. Computer Assisted Language Learning programs can be developed for the many parts of the language learning process.

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